#1
I have an Ibanez RG220 (with a double locking Floyd) and I just spent half a day cleaning, re-stringing, and setting it up. I went from 9's to 11's, so setting up the Floyd and doing the intonation settings was quite an ordeal. Anyway, I cleaned the fretboard using the finest level 3M Scotch Pads (equivalent to "0000" steel wool) and polished it with Guitar Honey, but when I bend a string or do a vibrato, it sounds as if the fretboard is rough and the strings are scratching against it, and it sounds hideous!

I play the 11's, and my other guitar has had 11's for a long time (and it sounds fine), but I bought the (used) RG220 recently, and it came with 9's. The fretboard doesn't feel rough when I inspect it, and this couldn't be due to the frets themselves, but a bend or a vibrato makes me grate my teeth in pain! Does anyone know what could be going on?
#2
scotch pads contain soap, bad idea to use them

you probably need to raise the action to acommadate the thicker gauge, and a truss rod adjustment for the the string tension, then setup the bridge.
#3
Sounds more like you scratched up the fretwire, although it is possible you dried out or scratched up the fretboard too. Rough wood can actually feel very smooth under your skin (hence why wenge is a very fast-playing wood even though it has very wide and open grain), so you may not have noticed it.

Frankly, there's no reason to be using a pad like that on the fretboard at all. Don't take this personally, but I don't know what the hell you were thinking using effectively a scouring pad to ''clean'' your fretboard. The only thing you should be using near the fretboard is a dry, inkless, microfibre cloth and every year and a half or so, a couple of squirts of lemon oil if it's a rosewood fretboard. There is no reason or logic to using an abrasive surface of any kind on it.

I would suggest you inspect the fretwire closely. If the frets have indeed become quite scratched (which is very likely) then the fretwire will need to be dressed or replaced. If the frets are okay and it is indeed the fretboard that is rough, it may need to be refinished if it is a maple fretboard or lightly sanded if it is a rosewood or ebony fretboard - neither are tasks you should attempt to do yourself. If the fretboard is rosewood or ebony and has simply become very dried out as a result of your cleaning, dab a very small amount of lemon oil (or synthetic guitar fretboard treatment oil of your choice) onto an inkless, otherwise dry, microfibre cloth, and very lightly rub that into the fretboard using smooth and soft circular motions. Do not scrub at the fretboard, as this will onyl make it worse. Ebony fretboards need less than high-grade rosewood fretboards and in turn, high-grade rosewood fretboards need less oil than lower-grade rosewood fretboards, so adjust the amount of oil you use to suit (although even on the driest and lowest quality rosewood fretboards, no more than three or four drops of oil is ever required). This should rejuvenate the wood.
Yes, I know everything. No, I can't play worth a damn.
A child is trafficked and sold for sex slavery every 30 seconds. Support Love146.
#4
ibanezgod1973 - Oh, I didn't use the scotch pads with soap, just the scrubbing sheets. Also, since I went from 9's to 11's, I tightened the truss rod 1/8th of a turn, and the bridge is setup perfectly.

MrFlibble - Yeah, I've been berating myself for using the scotch pad, but I was just following the instructions from some of the videos on youtube recommending the "0000" steel wool to buff the fretboard. Damn, even the directions on the guitar honey (which I used instead of lemon oil) bottle recommend it.

Moreover, the fretboard was pretty grimy, and I couldn't get all the gunk out with the old tee shirt that I used to clean the guitar. I was looking at the fretboard closely, and it doesn't seem like I've scratched the frets themselves, but just the wood on the (rosewood) fingerboard. Also, I didn't buff the entire fretboard, but just the parts with stubborn grime.

Anyway, thanks for your comments and advise, and if every bend/vibrato is gonna make me wanna pull my hair out, I'll consider getting the fingerboard sanded by a professional.
#5
If you're sure it's not the frets, you can try not pressing down on the strings so hard. The strings shouldn't ever really touch the fretboard anyway - only your fingers should, and only during bends/similar techniques.
Spin 'round carousel when your horse isn't screwed in.

My band:
Fractured Instinct
(For fans of Death/Groove/Prog Metal)

Ibanez RGA42E
Ibanez S420
LTD H-301
Ibanez RG520
Peavey Predator USA
Douglas Grendel 725
Line 6 Pod HD500X
#6
Oh, that's how I could tell that it's not the frets that are scratched. I tend to press down on the strings pretty hard when I play, and the RG220 has jumbo frets. I can still fret a note by gently pressing the string against the fret (and just barely touching the wood), thus somewhat rendering it a scalloped fretboard feel. Perhaps I should improve my technique!
#7
Have you also considered that the string might be making that sound because of the string itself? On my Yamaha classical guitar the strings I feel on it feel really gritty and rough against the frets, even though the frets are fine. I think some strings are just bad. Did you use a different brand than you're used to?
Spin 'round carousel when your horse isn't screwed in.

My band:
Fractured Instinct
(For fans of Death/Groove/Prog Metal)

Ibanez RGA42E
Ibanez S420
LTD H-301
Ibanez RG520
Peavey Predator USA
Douglas Grendel 725
Line 6 Pod HD500X
#8
Well, that occurred to me, but I've always played Ernie Ball Power Slinkys, and that's what I have on my other guitar, and that sounds fine. In all honesty, the RG220's fretboard didn't feel as smooth as the other one (it's a guitar that I had custom made by a luthier in India) when I bought it to begin with, and now it's worse. Damn, I shouldn't have used the scotch pad! A refinish may be in order.
#9
I don't ever use steel wool. There's a lot of micro fibers that can get into and scratch the fretboard. So I just use a soft cloth to clean my guitar.
#10
Quote by ibanezgod1973
scotch pads contain soap, bad idea to use them

you probably need to raise the action to acommadate the thicker gauge, and a truss rod adjustment for the the string tension, then setup the bridge.



The truss rod has nothing to do with string tension.Period. It is for adjusting relief in the neck only. Not tension,action,the phase of the moon but,neck relief . If all else fails search is your friend before spewing garbage.
Bhaok

The following statement is true. The proceeding statement is false.
#11
Quote by Bhaok
The truss rod has nothing to do with string tension.Period. It is for adjusting relief in the neck only. Not tension,action,the phase of the moon but,neck relief . If all else fails search is your friend before spewing garbage.

The truss rod (relief) is affected by string tension. You don't use the Truss Rod to affect string tension, but string tension can sure affect the neck and the rod within. Or did I miss something?

I think they need to write 'UG Google' over the search bar. A lot of folks don't seem to know what that does up there.
Water which is too pure has no fish - Ts'ai Ken T'an
Last edited by Ratraisin at Aug 20, 2010,
#13
Spit and a clean cotton or flannel cloth. Or maybe one of those micro fibre ones.
Water which is too pure has no fish - Ts'ai Ken T'an