#1
A time ago, I learned (what i thought to be) the greatest thing ever: minor pentatonic scales. I'm completely infatuated by blues/classic rock, but always was challenged to play heavy metal by my so called "peers". after a year or so of "you're just not metal enough", I've came to accept that it's not really my style of playing. My problem being, I favor improvisation on minor pentatonics scales. I'm soon forming a blues/rock band with a friend, and would really like to step up my game.

What are some techniques, ideas, videos, lesson's, scales that you feel should be mandatory for the genre i love?

anything you have to offer would be absolutely great, and very much appreciated.
#2
Make sure you are used to improvising from the natural minor scale and major scale. In blues rock diminished scale is very very rare, but, if you are stuck while writing a solo try using diminished tonality's to spice thing up.
Quote by beadhangingOne
Are you talking about those weird sphincter-spasms where it feels like there's a ghost dick in your ass for a little while and then it just disappears?
#3
learn scales and all that shit as if you were a jazz guitarist, as if you were a metal guitarist, as if you were a classical guitarist, and as if you were (and are) a blues guitarist, because the more you learn, the more diverse of a palette you have, and the more unique of a guitarist you sound
Eh.
#4
Do what most of the blues and classic rock legends did: use pentatonic scales as a base, and every now and then throw in a flattened note or a quarter step bend. Very, very few of the real blues greats even learnt the minor pentatonic specifically, they just play(ed) whatever sounds good. Frankly, being a good blues or classic rock guitarist is more about messing about with everything and learning what works and what doesn't from experience rather than memorising a load of theory and following that. I'm not saying that knowing a lot of theory is bad, just that it isn't what blues was born out of. Studying a lot will certainly help, but it means nothing without experience. There's no quick fix to becoming a good blues player.
Yes, I know everything. No, I can't play worth a damn.
A child is trafficked and sold for sex slavery every 30 seconds. Support Love146.
#5
Quote by Lead_for_life
A time ago, I learned (what i thought to be) the greatest thing ever: minor pentatonic scales. I'm completely infatuated by blues/classic rock, but always was challenged to play heavy metal by my so called "peers". after a year or so of "you're just not metal enough", I've came to accept that it's not really my style of playing. My problem being, I favor improvisation on minor pentatonics scales. I'm soon forming a blues/rock band with a friend, and would really like to step up my game.

What are some techniques, ideas, videos, lesson's, scales that you feel should be mandatory for the genre i love?

anything you have to offer would be absolutely great, and very much appreciated.

The minor pentatonic scale.

Also learn the major scale, major pentatonic (which is just the major scale missing 2 notes, so when you learn the major scale you automatically learn the major pentatonic...2 for1, how cool is that), and the natural minor scale, which is the scale the minor pentatonic is derived from and simply has 2 more notes.

However, in all honesty in a bles/rock contect the minor pentatonic is what you'll find yourself using most of the time.
Actually called Mark!

Quote by TNfootballfan62
People with a duck for their avatar always give good advice.

...it's a seagull

Quote by Dave_Mc
i wanna see a clip of a recto buying some groceries.


stuffmycatswatchontv.tumblr.com
#6
I agree with the natural minor (AKA Aeolian mode) then you can start utilizing 3 notes per string stuff more...since I learned that scale I can't even play the "stock" minoir pentatonic anymore lol
I'd also learn the harmonic minor scale its not that different from natural minor,you don't have to be a shredder to use it either,Slash uses it a lot for the classic rock style stuff he does

As far as recommended videos try to find clips or download Zakk Wyldes pentatonic hardcore video,its very easy to follow and its pretty much all minor pentatonic
Fender 70s Ri Strats w/various Dimarzios
Modded 1982 Marshall JCM800 2203

Boss DS-1,Dunlop Crybaby,MXR Phase 90,Ibanez AD9,Boss CH-1

Check out randy dobsons underground ,tell me what you think
#7
it depends how you play. some metal sounding stuff is still pentatonic stuff or can be if you paly it right. for example i see a lot of sabbath solos that are what i think minor pentatonic. after all, that part of metal was so early it was rock guys that began to start it.

and other stuff. recently i got infatuated with the rock you like a hurricane solos cause they sound sweet so i learned them all note for note. im no expert, but im pretty sure its all minor pentatonic based.

and brian may. not nessesarily a metal guitarit either, but he can semi-shred (i want it all solos). pretty sure a lot of his stuff is not all minor penatonic, but it is used. im not sure what hes using in the i want it all solos. i just play them.

so...learn some other scales, and add that to your minor pentatonic. then play some songs and see different styles so you better know how to use the scales you know. you can play the minor penatonic like BB King, or you can play it like a metal guitarist and it will sound completely different.