#2
Minor / major pentatonic & diatonic scales. Phyrgian scale ( in my opinion ) , chromatic scale , blues scale and Harmonic minor. Also memorize arpeggios.
#3
Phrygian dominant.
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As my old guitar teacher once said: Metal really comes from classical music. The only difference is pinch harmonics, double bass, and lyrics about killing goats.
#4
in metal
harmonic minor
phrygian dominant
pentatonic minor
minor(just the standard minor scale)

pretty much any minor scale can be used in metal
#5
Yes, I would agree that now might be a GREAT time to learn modes. Phrygian and Locrian work well for metal, and quite often all you need is the pure minor scale (Aeolian mode). Memorize the modal shapes and practice soloing in them in different keys.

When playing rock, the pentatonic blues scale is a must, as well as the Aeolian mode, which is the same as pure minor.

In metal, chromatic notes can be used for extra flavor. These notes occur outside of a particular scale.
#6
Actually this would be an awful time to be worrying about modes.

TS, just remember this - memorising scales isn't particularly useful or important, understanding them is.
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#7
Metal and rock... I think you'll find minor pentatonic variations the most useful overall if you're just starting out. Extremely common in popular music and pretty easy to learn. After getting comfortable with that, it's not a big leap into the natural minor and its variations.

But I agree with Seagull. You'll do far better in the long run to understand scale constructions and their applications. Build yourself a solid foundation and go from there. With that approach, you'll see that "other" scales like harmonic & melodic minors for example, are nothing but simple variations on the natural minor.

Know intervals. Study a scale's construction from the get-go. (before you practice it even).
Then learning variations and derivatives in context of what you already know will come to you easily.

(just my humble opinion - hope it made sense) Good luck.
#8
Quote by steven seagull
Actually this would be an awful time to be worrying about modes.

TS, just remember this - memorising scales isn't particularly useful or important, understanding them is.

Agreed....learn natural minor like back of your hand then learn the theory of modes a at very slow pace...
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