#1

Can some help explain what to do with the above?
I mean, unless it's GP5 messing up, can someone explain which E I should play when encountering the note in the notation above.
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Quote by Doppelgänger
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- Ibanez S670FM w/ JB
- Fender 'Lite Ash' Stratocaster
- Fender '72 Deluxe Telecaster
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#4
Quote by DiminishedFifth
Just play what's more comfortable to play. It doesn't really matter. An E, is an E, is an E.


I suppose so. It does strike me as being odd [of course, they both would have the same frequency so that makes sense, so ]
Sunn O))):
Quote by Doppelgänger
You could always just sleep beside your refrigerator.

Guitar:
- Ibanez S670FM w/ JB
- Fender 'Lite Ash' Stratocaster
- Fender '72 Deluxe Telecaster
- Arbiter LP Jr. Doublecut
Amp:
- Laney VC15

'72 Tele Appreciation Group
RIP DIO
#5
Quote by Simsimius
I suppose so. It does strike me as being odd [of course, they both would have the same frequency so that makes sense, so ]

The only real noticeable difference would be timbre. the E on the 3rd string would have a very soft timbre, while the Open E would be more harsh.
#6
Quote by DiminishedFifth
The only real noticeable difference would be timbre. the E on the 3rd string would have a very soft timbre, while the Open E would be more harsh.


True.
But, sorry to add another question, if you want, for example, specifically the open E for it's timbre, how could that be notated?
Sunn O))):
Quote by Doppelgänger
You could always just sleep beside your refrigerator.

Guitar:
- Ibanez S670FM w/ JB
- Fender 'Lite Ash' Stratocaster
- Fender '72 Deluxe Telecaster
- Arbiter LP Jr. Doublecut
Amp:
- Laney VC15

'72 Tele Appreciation Group
RIP DIO
#7
Quote by Simsimius
True.
But, sorry to add another question, if you want, for example, specifically the open E for it's timbre, how could that be notated?

I would notate it exactly like it is, but then as a comment say "In open position"
#8
Quote by DiminishedFifth
I would notate it exactly like it is, but then as a comment say "In open position"


Alright, that's cool. Thanks.

I decided I might as well learn how to read notation as I intend on buying a Jazz theory book that everyone seems to rave about, and being able to read the notation would definitely be a huge benefit [as opposed to entering everything into GP5, or having to "EGBDF" each time].
Sunn O))):
Quote by Doppelgänger
You could always just sleep beside your refrigerator.

Guitar:
- Ibanez S670FM w/ JB
- Fender 'Lite Ash' Stratocaster
- Fender '72 Deluxe Telecaster
- Arbiter LP Jr. Doublecut
Amp:
- Laney VC15

'72 Tele Appreciation Group
RIP DIO
#9
I always encourage students to find their own voice. I violate all of my guitar books with pencil-marks changing notes I don't particularly like into ones that I like. Why play by recipe? A computer can do that for you!

Find the "expression" of E that works best, or that feels good today, and worry about more important matters, like your tone.

..or finding some hep cats to jam with.
"Virtually no one who is taught Relativity continues to read the Bible."

#10
Quote by Bubonic Chronic
I always encourage students to find their own voice. I violate all of my guitar books with pencil-marks changing notes I don't particularly like into ones that I like. Why play by recipe? A computer can do that for you!

Find the "expression" of E that works best, or that feels good today, and worry about more important matters, like your tone.

..or finding some hep cats to jam with.


Alright, thanks.
Sunn O))):
Quote by Doppelgänger
You could always just sleep beside your refrigerator.

Guitar:
- Ibanez S670FM w/ JB
- Fender 'Lite Ash' Stratocaster
- Fender '72 Deluxe Telecaster
- Arbiter LP Jr. Doublecut
Amp:
- Laney VC15

'72 Tele Appreciation Group
RIP DIO
#11
If you want a note to be played an a specific string you can write "Sul" and then the name of the string, so in your case if you wanted E on the 9th fret of the G string you could notate the E and then write 'Sul G'. Or just write it English.
Last edited by griffRG7321 at Aug 16, 2010,
#12
Quote by griffRG7321
If you want a note to be played an a specific string you can write "Sul" and then the name of the string, so in your case if you wanted E on the 9th fret of the G string you could notate the E and then write 'Sul G'. Or just write it English.


Huh, that's very interesting and useful. Thanks.
Sunn O))):
Quote by Doppelgänger
You could always just sleep beside your refrigerator.

Guitar:
- Ibanez S670FM w/ JB
- Fender 'Lite Ash' Stratocaster
- Fender '72 Deluxe Telecaster
- Arbiter LP Jr. Doublecut
Amp:
- Laney VC15

'72 Tele Appreciation Group
RIP DIO
#14
This is why even advanced guitarists still need to use tab.. I've heard some people look down on tab, saying stuff like 'it's the lazy / stupid way, go standard notation instead!'

Using both gets you the best of both worlds!
#15
Quote by ShadesOfGray
This is why even advanced guitarists still need to use tab.. I've heard some people look down on tab, saying stuff like 'it's the lazy / stupid way, go standard notation instead!'

Using both gets you the best of both worlds!


Yeah, with tab you can see the best way to play a piece. I'd still use tab for anything guitar related.
Sunn O))):
Quote by Doppelgänger
You could always just sleep beside your refrigerator.

Guitar:
- Ibanez S670FM w/ JB
- Fender 'Lite Ash' Stratocaster
- Fender '72 Deluxe Telecaster
- Arbiter LP Jr. Doublecut
Amp:
- Laney VC15

'72 Tele Appreciation Group
RIP DIO
#16
Quote by ShadesOfGray
This is why even advanced guitarists still need to use tab.. I've heard some people look down on tab, saying stuff like 'it's the lazy / stupid way, go standard notation instead!'

Using both gets you the best of both worlds!

I've actually seen pieces that did it like GP: They had the "most comfortable" fingerings/positions below the staff in tab form. It was really useful.