#1
I've learned a bunch of chords now but while playing songs I find some of my fingers "lag" behind. For example, if I switch to play a G, I find my pinky and ring finger land quickly, but my middle and index take an extra second to hit the strings. Same with C, My index will land quick followed by my middle and then finally my ring.

Am I doing something wrong or is it simply a case of needing to play more?

p.s I've only been playing for 2 months.
#3
cool. I was hoping it was just a practice thing and not a technique thing.

Thanks for the quick response!
#4
That's totally natural, you'll get the hang of it soon, just keep practicing.
#5
dont worry, this is just soooo normal keep playing! learning by doing!
Gear
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Ibanez SA-S32 FMTL
Engl Screamer Head
Engl SS412 V60 Celestion
Engl Z5 Footswitch
Ibanez Delay
BOSS MegaDistortion
#6
I've been playing for a while, but my fingers still do that... i.e. some fingers move to the chords faster than others. I think my stronger fingers go there and provide a reference for where my weaker fingers go. However, over time... the lag is less and even though there is still a lag, I don't really have trouble changing chords smoothly even when i'm playing quick so... I wouldn't worry about it too much.... just keep playing.
#7
No one mentioned a metronome. 8-) I suggest using a metronome at a slow bpm and practice switching between chords. A metronome has a way of whipping you into shape. I like to use simple drum beats for a metronome. I use Fruity Loops and they have a plug-in called EZdrummer. I think EZdrummer even has a stand alone program. Any how try switching those chords to a beat. A slow beat at first, of course.
#8
Quote by fuzzymonkey
No one mentioned a metronome. 8-) I suggest using a metronome at a slow bpm and practice switching between chords. A metronome has a way of whipping you into shape. I like to use simple drum beats for a metronome. I use Fruity Loops and they have a plug-in called EZdrummer. I think EZdrummer even has a stand alone program. Any how try switching those chords to a beat. A slow beat at first, of course.


+1.
#9
I am just a beginner (6 mos into this) but I got so hung up on trying to use all my fingers all at once when making a chord shape. And got very discouraged like you when this did not happen quickly. As my strumming got better I learned that having straggling fingers actually helps the song! As you are strumming your pattern, that first strum might not have all your fingers on the chord, if you find that happening then just dont strum the full chord untill the next strum.. only strum 2 or 3 strings on that first strum in the progression.. Later you will understand a slight variation of the chord gives your song characture! What ever you do, do not get hung up on this.. Use it to your advantage!It happens so fast other people will not even realise that you are "cheating" by not playing those 3 other strings untill the next strum ,when all your fingers are making the chord shape..Relax and place the chord shape on the strings. Don't tighten up and rigidly try and force the chord shape to happen quickly.It will sound mechanical and abrupt. Relax and have fun!
Good Luck to you!
Last edited by CRAIGARRR at Aug 19, 2010,
#10
Try to practice switching chords (A-D-C-G-E, things like that) slowly for a couple of minutes every day. One of my friends that has been playing longer than i have (3 years) still 'lags', so it's important to learn to switch accurately and quickly.

Don't worry though, you'll get it in time. Just keep at it.
#11
Learn a couple of easy scales do ray me and pentatonic. Us these scales as a warm up before practise. One it will help train your ears and two it will increase finger speed and dexteroity.
Cheers
Last edited by tuxs at Aug 20, 2010,