#1
Are they used only for specific genres and music or will it songs sound better if you were to play it with a drop tuning?
#3
Dropping the pitch of your strings, usually heavier music is played on drop tunings.
#5
A "drop" tuning usually refers to the lowest string tuned down a whole step compared to the rest of the strings, so:

Drop D:
EADGBE -> DADGBE

Drop C:
DGCFAD -> CGCFAD

It makes the interval from the sixth and fifth strings a fifth instead of a fourth, like how a violin is tuned. You can play a note, its fifth and its octave with just one finger:

D: 0 or 3
A: 0 or 3
D: 0 or 3

You can get bigger sounding chords with less difficulty. It's mainly about the phrasing you can do.
#8
Quote by Dayn
A "drop" tuning usually refers to the lowest string tuned down a whole step compared to the rest of the strings, so:

Drop D:
EADGBE -> DADGBE

Drop C:
DGCFAD -> CGCFAD

It makes the interval from the sixth and fifth strings a fifth instead of a fourth, like how a violin is tuned. You can play a note, its fifth and its octave with just one finger:

D: 0 or 3
A: 0 or 3
D: 0 or 3

You can get bigger sounding chords with less difficulty. It's mainly about the phrasing you can do.


this pretty much.
Never imagine yourself not to be otherwise than what it might appear to others that what you were or might have been was not otherwise than what you had been would have appeared to them to be otherwise
#9
Quote by Dayn
A "drop" tuning usually refers to the lowest string tuned down a whole step compared to the rest of the strings, so:

Drop D:
EADGBE -> DADGBE

Drop C:
DGCFAD -> CGCFAD

It makes the interval from the sixth and fifth strings a fifth instead of a fourth, like how a violin is tuned. You can play a note, its fifth and its octave with just one finger:

D: 0 or 3
A: 0 or 3
D: 0 or 3

You can get bigger sounding chords with less difficulty. It's mainly about the phrasing you can do.

+1
Gear:

Guitars: Ibanez SV5470F, Ibanez Xpt700, Fender MIM Standard Stratocaster ('04-'05), Jackson Ps-2
Ashton AG200,
Amps: ENGL E530, Bugera 6262-212,
FX: TC Electronics G-major 2, Behringer EQ700, Morley Volume / Wah
#10
Quote by sealtain
So it's more suitable for rhythm guitar?

Not really, they just give you two extra low notes on the lowest string.
Gear:

Guitars: Ibanez SV5470F, Ibanez Xpt700, Fender MIM Standard Stratocaster ('04-'05), Jackson Ps-2
Ashton AG200,
Amps: ENGL E530, Bugera 6262-212,
FX: TC Electronics G-major 2, Behringer EQ700, Morley Volume / Wah
#11
Quote by sealtain
So it's more suitable for rhythm guitar?

It really depends on your phrasing. Instead of drop D, you might prefer to have the bottom strings be a perfect fourth apart and just tune to D standard by dropping every string a whole step. Maybe you just want a bit more lower end for quick and easy rhythm playing, so you might choose drop D.

You might do some two hand tapping, playing the same thing on both low D strings simultaneously:
D: 12-0-4/7-12-0-4-7-4-0
It's handy if you have a riff on your 4th string with open D notes, you can then play it an octave lower if you want without changing your fingering at all.

Drop tunings are used for open chord tunings too; DADFAD would be an open Dm, DADGAD would be an open Dsus4.
Last edited by Dayn at Aug 17, 2010,