#1
My first guitar was given to me by my Dad, in a gesture that I couldn't really appreciate since he'd had the guitar for well over 20 years when it came into my hands, and he loved it very much. Not surprisingly, this wonderful sounding bit of kit has gone a bit sour over the years, since many of the bits are stock. Starting to get sick of it, I decided to go ahead and fix the beauty up a bit. I figured a thread might be nice since I figured my fellow guitar geeks might appreciate a little bit of a formerly sex incarnate guitar getting a bit of a face lift

Here she is just chillin':


Now, what I intend to do is:
  • Replace the nut
  • Replace the bridge
  • Refret it
  • Have the electronics looked at
  • Maybe get locking tuners.


I wish to replace the nut for a graphite one, and the bridge is generally grubby and rusting, with a screw or two missing. It was starting to depress me.
I wanted to refret this bad boy simply because it's getting really difficult to play - In some arbitrary places it just takes entirely too much effort to fret, even with relatively light strings. The techy department at my school agreed to let me use their tools and such so I could do this myself. As for the electronics, I reckon there's a grounding issue. Mainly because people have told me this is most likely the case, as I know nothing of electronics. So I have requisitioned my drummer to take a look, since he's much more savvy than I.
The locking tuners are neither here nor there; I'm not sure whether or not I want to. How far would you recommend it?

Anyway, thanks for reading. I'll try and keep you all posted. If anyone wants pics I'll try and supply, but I can't promise they'll be great quality

Edit: I'll be damned, the nut and the bridge arrived in the post just after posting this. RESULT!
The UG Awards exist only to instill me with existential doubt.


For me, the 60's ended that day in 1978...

Willies. Fuck the lick and fuck you too.
Last edited by TheBurningFish at Aug 17, 2010,
#3
A re-fret is no simple task. Its very tedious work, and requires a lot of fine detail work. Experience is key. Its not something I recommend for someone to jump into. If you really want to go that route I would buy a warped or bent neck from e-bay and start practicing.
Trust me you don't want to go learning the ropes on a neck you intend to use.
All your other planned mods sound fine. Good luck.
#4
Sexy guitar, and the Tolkien book right next to it is a nice touch.

Waiting to see the facelift result!


As far as the locking tuners go, i never felt the need to have them.
I just restring it like taught in this thread, like this:

(Invalid img)

and the stock tuners on my guitars behave pretty much like locking tuners.
I don't have any tuning issues whatsoever.

Besides, that guitar has a fixed bridge (like mine: my PRS has a fixed bridge, and i don't use the tremolo on my Strat, so i unscrewed it), so attaching the strings like that is probably more than enough.
Squier "VMC" Stratocaster
PRS SE Singlecut
tc electronic polytune
CMAT MODS Signa Drive
Blakemore Effects Deus Ex Machina
DIY gaussmarkov Dr. Boogey
EHX Small Clone
Mooer ShimVerb
DIY Beavis Devolt
T-REX Fuel Tank Chameleon
Ampeg GVT52-112
#5
Quote by Matt420740
A re-fret is no simple task. Its very tedious work, and requires a lot of fine detail work. Experience is key. Its not something I recommend for someone to jump into. If you really want to go that route I would buy a warped or bent neck from e-bay and start practicing.
Trust me you don't want to go learning the ropes on a neck you intend to use.
All your other planned mods sound fine. Good luck.

What's the danger? (genuine question, not rhetorical, btw)

If it matters, I have a fair bit of woodworking experience and I have professionals on hand to help out (people with a hell of a lot of woodwork and metal work experience). I just didn't think it would be all that complex.

And I have plenty of free time and I'm not bothered about tedium.

Also, I don't really have the money to get someone to do it for me, otherwise I might have.
Quote by Linkerman
Sexy guitar, and the Tolkien book right next to it is a nice touch.

Waiting to see the facelift result!

As far as the locking tuners go, i never felt the need to have them.
I just restring it like taught in this thread, like this:

http://us.st12.yimg.com/us.st.yimg.com/I/stringthis_1659_14215[/MG]

and the stock tuners on my guitars behave pretty much like locking tuners.
I don't have any tuning issues whatsoever.

Besides, that guitar has a fixed bridge (like mine: my PRS has a fixed bridge, and i don't use the tremolo on my Strat, so i unscrewed it), so attaching the strings like that is probably more than enough.



I didn't think it would make much of a difference to be honest. That's why I asked here before buying them
The UG Awards exist only to instill me with existential doubt.


For me, the 60's ended that day in 1978...

Willies. Fuck the lick and fuck you too.
#6
Quote by TheBurningFish
What's the danger? (genuine question, not rhetorical, btw)

If it matters, I have a fair bit of woodworking experience and I have professionals on hand to help out (people with a hell of a lot of woodwork and metal work experience). I just didn't think it would be all that complex.

And I have plenty of free time and I'm not bothered about tedium.

Also, I don't really have the money to get someone to do it for me, otherwise I might have.



I didn't think it would make much of a difference to be honest. That's why I asked here before buying them



For one, tear-out can be a big problem. When you pull the old frets if the board is very dry, the fret tangs can pull out wood from near the slot. Leaving chunks of wood missing from the board. The chips can be glued back in place, but getting it to look perfect again is a different story. Heating the frets before pulling can help reduce tear-out.
As you know, most maple necks have a finish over the board, so expect that to be damaged as well while pulling the old frets. You could get lucky, but you might as well plan on re-finishing a maple neck as part of a re-fret.
Once you have installed the new frets you will need to level them. they shouldn't need much if you installed them correctly, but they will still need a little work. The leveling process isn't so hard, if you have the right tools and materials and know what to do. The hardest part to get just right is the fret ends. They must be beveled at least, and if you want a really nice feel, you can roll the fret edges. It takes a lot of practice and experience to get those fret ends uniform all the way down the neck.

I'm not doubting you at all. Or trying to discourage you. You should be able to do a fret job with the right materials and as long as you do your homework. i just don't recommend doing your first full fret job on an axe you plan to use a lot. Practice on some scrap first, get your technique to a point your happy, then do your neck. You will be a lot happier with the results, if you have the process down pat before you even start.

Edit: Here is a link to a great video series covering a full re-fret of a strat - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tka_BQ_tl1U&feature=channel
Last edited by Matt420740 at Aug 17, 2010,
#7
Quote by Matt420740
For one, tear-out can be a big problem. When you pull the old frets if the board is very dry, the fret tangs can pull out wood from near the slot. Leaving chunks of wood missing from the board. The chips can be glued back in place, but getting it to look perfect again is a different story. Heating the frets before pulling can help reduce tear-out.
As you know, most maple necks have a finish over the board, so expect that to be damaged as well while pulling the old frets. You could get lucky, but you might as well plan on re-finishing a maple neck as part of a re-fret.
Once you have installed the new frets you will need to level them. they shouldn't need much if you installed them correctly, but they will still need a little work. The leveling process isn't so hard, if you have the right tools and materials and know what to do. The hardest part to get just right is the fret ends. They must be beveled at least, and if you want a really nice feel, you can roll the fret edges. It takes a lot of practice and experience to get those fret ends uniform all the way down the neck.

I'm not doubting you at all. Or trying to discourage you. You should be able to do a fret job with the right materials and as long as you do your homework. i just don't recommend doing your first full fret job on an axe you plan to use a lot. Practice on some scrap first, get your technique to a point your happy, then do your neck. You will be a lot happier with the results, if you have the process down pat before you even start.

Edit: Here is a link to a great video series covering a full re-fret of a strat - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tka_BQ_tl1U&feature=channel

All right, fair enough. I had pretty much factored in a refinish anyway, and to be honest, it kinda wants it It's been fairly well knocked about.

It wouldn't necessarily have to be a neck to practise on though, would it? I could practise on a piece of scrap roughly the same size, I would have thought.

Anyway, thanks for the advice and the vid
The UG Awards exist only to instill me with existential doubt.


For me, the 60's ended that day in 1978...

Willies. Fuck the lick and fuck you too.
#8
Quote by TheBurningFish


It wouldn't necessarily have to be a neck to practise on though, would it? I could practise on a piece of scrap roughly the same size, I would have thought.


Of course. Keep in mind you'll have to cut your own fret slots in the scrap though. But it will work.