#1
hi guys. so recently i have been practing my scales alot more. and was wondering how u finish the scale if u dont start on the low e string for the root note. say if i were to start on the a srting and so on, how do i finish them? i know its generaly the same patter just moving it up or down right? and i was also wondering how you connect scales. i looked to columns on it but didnt find anything so sorry in advance is there is something already out there, but i feel like i am constricted to the 1 scale with the root note being on the e string cause i dont know how to connect scales and i dont know how to play a scale any higher than the low e string. all help is appreciated. thanks guys
#2
It's.called understanding how scales work, which will help you understand how you can move them through the fretboard. Im new to theory myself.
But each scale is based off seen notes which we assign the numbers 1 through 7 to.
For instance the c major scale contains:
1 2 3 4 5 6 7
C D E F G A B
and then it repeats, so if you know what note you are on you can make the scale up as you go.
You should also read an introduction to modes in the FAQ because that explanation is far better than one I could offer you.
#3
In general, a guitar solo will end and/or start on the root, 3rd or 5th of the scale, or a common note with the chord played immediately after the solo ends.

When you play a scale over the complete fretboard, the root, 3rd and 5th of the scale multiple times as the scale repeats itself. If you play over only one octave, you'll only encounter each once. If you are just staying in a "box" or "shape" for now, you'll generally encounter each twice (as low E to high E is 2 octaves).

So your next question would be "where is the root, 3rd and 5th notes?". Time to count. The root is the 1st note, the 3rd is the 3rd, and the 5th is the 5th. Over time you'll learn the sound of each and it will be a lot easier.

Also "do you have to end where you started?". No, quite often a solo will start low, and end high, but the choice of notes is just up to you.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
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#4
ok ill check that intorudction to modes. this is where things start 2 get difficult for me though. i hate learning theory cause it seems so complex. maybe its just teh wording, not sure. i feel like its way over my head though. really wish i had a guitar teacher for it
#5
Quote by Vicious_Turtle
ok ill check that intorudction to modes. this is where things start 2 get difficult for me though. i hate learning theory cause it seems so complex. maybe its just teh wording, not sure. i feel like its way over my head though. really wish i had a guitar teacher for it


I highly recommend you hold off on modes unless you have a very, very firm (more like choking the life out of it) grasp of tonal music. Harmony, scales, chords, etc.

Many people get into modes way before they are ready for it and get misinformed.
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#7
Quote by Vicious_Turtle
hi guys. so recently i have been practing my scales alot more. and was wondering how u finish the scale if u dont start on the low e string for the root note. say if i were to start on the a srting and so on, how do i finish them? i know its generaly the same patter just moving it up or down right? and i was also wondering how you connect scales. i looked to columns on it but didnt find anything so sorry in advance is there is something already out there, but i feel like i am constricted to the 1 scale with the root note being on the e string cause i dont know how to connect scales and i dont know how to play a scale any higher than the low e string. all help is appreciated. thanks guys



That's really a great question, Many times the best answer is you learn the whole of a scale and then break it up into parts, meaning that through improvisation you learn what works and what doesn't using your ear. While I see that point, I don't think its the best way to do this, its more about knowing your intervals and notes and understanding how the entire scale can be played everywhere on the neck. There are a few systems that seek to do this, such as the Caged system.

There are also ways that people suggest learning all scales on a single string. Its very time consuming though, and Ive found this idea to have dubious value and merit.

Your question highlights just one complaint that I have about Caged and the Box System.

Best,

Sean
#8
You might want to try out reading into voice leading or progressions & cadences.

Basically, 'ending on the root note' is the rule of thumb people first learn, it kinda works but it's inaccurate and isnt the most effective / musical way of ending.
Every degree in a scale (and also, ever note that isnt in that scale) have a certain effect. So you can end on the first interval, but you could also end on the fifth, or seventh, or whatever. It also makes a difference which notes precede the ending, and what notes will happen after the solo.

For example, if there is already a progression / harmony going on, it's best to look at the chord notes you are playing over.

Or, say, the solo part and the part that comes after that are in a different key or tonality.. instead of resolving to the tonality of the part (solo) you are playing now, you could use notes that lead into the next part, giving a sense of natural flow and dynamics that can be very nice and wel.. epic? Relative sevenths and fifths work wonders for that.
Also, it's especially effective if those notes are shared by both tonalities.

As far as your question on connecting scales.. do you mean different scales or different fragments of the same scale? I'm assuming you meant the last.

It's important to understand that a scale doesnt only work 'horizontaly'. Most scales are learned as fragments, with between 2 and 4 nots per string from low e to high e.

Scales also work 'vertically'. The notes also go up and down a single string.

This means that when either you know the different fragments, or know the notes of the fretboard and which notes are in scale, you can travel both 'horizontaly' from string to string and 'vertically' on the same string.

Remember that in standard tuning, the notes on a string that are 5 frets higher happen on the next higher string. ('cept for G -> B offcoarse, then its 4 frets).
A scale 'shape' is just a repeating pattern of the same notes over and over. You have a pattern on a single string, but that pattern also repeats on the next string but 5 halve notes higher.
#9
Quote by ShadesOfGray
It's important to understand that a scale doesnt only work 'horizontaly'. Most scales are learned as fragments, with between 2 and 4 nots per string from low e to high e.

Scales also work 'vertically'. The notes also go up and down a single string.

This means that when either you know the different fragments, or know the notes of the fretboard and which notes are in scale, you can travel both 'horizontaly' from string to string and 'vertically' on the same string.
In fact, they don't have to work in any specific direction. Once you understand how scales work and are constructed, you are freed from the notion that scales are a strict horizontal or vertical pattern.
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea
#11
Quote by Vicious_Turtle
ok ill check that intorudction to modes. this is where things start 2 get difficult for me though.


Please don't. If you're having a tough time understanding how to use scales then modes are going to be way over your head. Read this first:

http://www.ultimate-guitar.com/search.php?s=Ultimate+Guide+to+Guitar&w=columns

That has great information on theory. Additionally, www.musictheory.net is a great guide. I think you'd be better off understanding how intervals work, and how they relate to each other. That will help you understand scales much better.
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