#1
Looking to upgrade my bass after completing my Rockschool exam a few days ago, looked around online (I haven't had time to have a nosy through shops yet) and checked the prices of some of my contenders.

GOSH!

Some seem crazily priced, like seriously. (It's probably a good time to mention I don't live in the states, I live in NZ) I looked at Squiers - because I've heard great things about them and they are without doubt bang for buck material - and the particular bass I was looking at the Squier Standard Jazz Bass was NZ$699

NZ$699 = USD$492.66 (or around about)

I thought . .DAMN. That seems crazy expensive, especially compared to prices at your (USA) online bass shops - guitar centre etc. And considering that is the CHEAPEST bass that I actually took a second glance at and was an actual brand I recognised.

Is it because New Zealand is such a small country, with a tiny bass market that they hike the prices so high?? THATS SO UNFAIR .. Or am I going crazy, and USD$490 is a reasonable price for a Squier?
There was once a wise Chinese man who said:

"All you can eat, $12.50"
#2
theres ups and downs to living in any country, australia and new zealand are among the most liveable countries in the world, with a much higher quality of life then america and england but at the same time they are also the most expensive countries to live in in the world, its not just guitars that are over priced, its everything.
#5
^ This man is a genius.....
He clearly knows what he's talking about.

You could do what I do and go to the States for a "holiday" and buy a bass....
#6
Quote by bass//player
Looking to upgrade my bass after completing my Rockschool exam a few days ago, looked around online (I haven't had time to have a nosy through shops yet) and checked the prices of some of my contenders.

GOSH!

Some seem crazily priced, like seriously. (It's probably a good time to mention I don't live in the states, I live in NZ) I looked at Squiers - because I've heard great things about them and they are without doubt bang for buck material - and the particular bass I was looking at the Squier Standard Jazz Bass was NZ$699

NZ$699 = USD$492.66 (or around about)

I thought . .DAMN. That seems crazy expensive, especially compared to prices at your (USA) online bass shops - guitar centre etc. And considering that is the CHEAPEST bass that I actually took a second glance at and was an actual brand I recognised.

Is it because New Zealand is such a small country, with a tiny bass market that they hike the prices so high?? THATS SO UNFAIR .. Or am I going crazy, and USD$490 is a reasonable price for a Squier?



On the other hand, I'm sure lamb chops are more affordable than the rest of the world, and I love lamb chops to death.
#7
Quote by ILoveGuitar07
ew...stop saying squier

Ever played a Squier Vintage Modified Jazz Bass, for example? Awesome bass.

Get up, go to a shop, and try a few Squier basses.
They have an amazing price/quality ratio. Even with the cheapest ones, you definitely get more than you pay for (at least, most of the times).

I have yet to see an Affinity Series Squier bass fail.
Most bass players in bands around here (mine included) use Squier Affinity Jazz or Precision basses, they abuse them, and they always sound good and never fall apart.
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Last edited by Linkerman at Aug 18, 2010,
#8
Supply and demand mostly. They sell less here (Aus and NZ) so suppliers and stores have to jack up their prices to make a profit, for amps take into consideration that most manfufactuors have to go out of to out of their way to make 240v versions as opposed to the more mass produced 120vs and then consider the fact they then have to ship it all over here.
Anyone feel to correct me if I've made any mistakes in that above statement too.

Your best bet is to look used over here. I've gone off buying new stuff mostly just because there's way better deals out there.

EDIT: On a semi-related note; I was over in NZ a month or two ago and I was absolutley amazed at how cheap your beer is! I could buy Aussie beer over there for cheaper than I could back home. Needless to say I don't exactly remember a fair bit of that trip... I'll be back soon though.
Last edited by consecutive e at Aug 18, 2010,
#9
Keep in mind to, it costs money to import/export instruments all over the world, and after shipping costs to NZ, and taking supply/demand into account, manufacturers and dealers still have to make the same amount of money as if they were selling it in the US.

The store in NZ and the store in the US both pay the same amount for any particular instrument, and both stores have to make the same amount of profit to stay afloat, but it costs more to get the bass to NZ, where the market is also smaller. Therefore, prices there have to be raised to profit enough off of each sale to keep the manufacturer happy, and to keep the dealer in business.
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#10
Quote by ILoveGuitar07
ew...stop saying squier

squier squier squier squier squier.

gear snobbery will get you no where. try actually playing one.
#12
I'm surprised it's so hard to find affordable instruments there in Aus and NZ. Seems it would be cheaper for the Asian manufacturers to ship them there than to the US. Indonesia is right there.
#13
Quote by strumandbang
I'm surprised it's so hard to find affordable instruments there in Aus and NZ. Seems it would be cheaper for the Asian manufacturers to ship them there than to the US. Indonesia is right there.

A lot of asian made instruments go to the US first for QC and whatnot. ESP/LTD is a good example of this. Say you buy a $800 LTD bass over there in the US we pay about $1800.
#14
It would make sense to have an Australian division where they could do QC and not incur all those costs associated with shipping them back and forth. There must be enough demand over there to justify it.

Or, just have an Australian guitar company make an agreement with the Asian manufacturers. ESP and the US companies aren't doing anything Aussies can't do.
Last edited by strumandbang at Aug 19, 2010,
#15
Quote by Linkerman
Ever played a Squier Vintage Modified Jazz Bass, for example? Awesome bass.

Get up, go to a shop, and try a few Squier basses.
They have an amazing price/quality ratio. Even with the cheapest ones, you definitely get more than you pay for (at least, most of the times).

I have yet to see an Affinity Series Squier bass fail.
Most bass players in bands around here (mine included) use Squier Affinity Jazz or Precision basses, they abuse them, and they always sound good and never fall apart.



amen
i have a blue squier affinity that ive done so many neck/pickup/pickguard swaps on...
but my favorite thin about that thing is a few years ago i learned to do that flippy thing where you throw it around your back and whatnot... soooooo i basically did this for a few months non stop, even in school, id have a free period in middle school because i was in the jazz band and i was supposed to "practice bass" i walked the halls flipping it. of cpurse id have strap locks. they wer dunlop ones but one day

and i shit you not

the actual cup of the strap lock gave in, the big mushroom lookin thingy split open and my bass flew soooo far... and still plays like a dream. no damage except for a bit of loff of paint but thats it at most

long story short squiers = the tank
Telecaster bass :
FINALLY PLAYABLE!
[x]body
[x]neck
[x]humbucker
[x]jazz pup
[x]split p pups
[x]hardware
[x]bridge
[x]pickguard
[ ]finish/paint
[x]wiring/electronics
#16
Well, this topic went for a change in subject .. but never mind. I like your story killcram187, it was a bit of a lol.
There was once a wise Chinese man who said:

"All you can eat, $12.50"