#1
Hi can someone show some light on my problem here please?

I have a Jackson JS30 Warrior, ive gutted the stock pups and replaced with emg81/85 combo.
The problem is im not in tune all the way up the neck, and i know how to intonate adjust bridge, truss rod etc. So i bought new strings and began the setup again....
On my fixed bridge i need to turn saddle towards the bottom of guitar but ive ran out of space and cant turn the screw any more. and the strings still playing flat/sharp.
Now if i replace the bridge as the saddles are quite worn, will this fix my problem or is it perhaps that the bridge is not screwed far enough back when they built it?
anyone heard of this problem?
#2
Dont Tighten your sattle all the way lol :P
Tighten/loosen it halfway and make sure there all lined up straight.
Also, look down your neck to inspect the height of your sattle, are the screws level with eachother? They need to be or your intonation will be all ****ed up.
The truss rod has absolutally nothing to do with it but if it needs to be adjusted do so, or your neck may get warped, never good

rock on man enjoy
#3
and loosen all your strings before adjusting your sattle if your tightening it unless u want them to break
#4
hi dude thanks for reply.
but the string in question is playing flat if i move the saddle to the middle it will become flatter surely? its a fixed bridge and each saddle has its own screw thats all i can adjust, apart from bridge height.
#5
Movign the saddle towards the headstock shortens the string length and raises the pitch, moving the saddle the other way lengthens the string and lowers the pitch. If your fretted 12th fret note is flat compared to the open string you need to shorten the string not lengthen it.
Moving on.....
#6
Quote by KenG
Movign the saddle towards the headstock shortens the string length and raises the pitch, moving the saddle the other way lengthens the string and lowers the pitch. If your fretted 12th fret note is flat compared to the open string you need to shorten the string not lengthen it.


^This. And it's highly unlikely they will end up in a straight line. (Just in case you were going along with that.) And the height adjustment screws are not likely to be even either. You will generally be a bit higher on the Bass E side. (Just in case you were going along with that, too.)

If you are in a case with a fixed bridge and you still need more length to intonate, you will commonly see the saddles reversed on the EAD strings (on TOM bridges at least). This gives just a little more length. 70 freakin' years and this still exists.
#7
thanks guys
unfortunately even when reversing the bridge im not able to adjust enough.
As the saddle have become incredibly worn down I was wondering if maybe i should buy a replacement bridge?
Would this help or do you think its the flawed design of said guitar?
I once took it to get a proper tune up at my local guitar shop and got it back with a new set of strings, but the same pissing problem on the g string.....GRrrrrrrrrrrrrrrr £20 down the toilet.
I've looked everywhere for this problem and i always get told to move screws a very small amount, which does absolutely nothing whatsoever.
If a replacement bridge is in order what cheapish bridges do you suggest?
#8
Quote by chopped-in-half
thanks guys
unfortunately even when reversing the bridge im not able to adjust enough.
As the saddle have become incredibly worn down I was wondering if maybe i should buy a replacement bridge?
Would this help or do you think its the flawed design of said guitar?
I once took it to get a proper tune up at my local guitar shop and got it back with a new set of strings, but the same pissing problem on the g string.....GRrrrrrrrrrrrrrrr £20 down the toilet.
I've looked everywhere for this problem and i always get told to move screws a very small amount, which does absolutely nothing whatsoever.
If a replacement bridge is in order what cheapish bridges do you suggest?

If the saddle is "incredibly worn down", then perhaps you should. GFS has about the cheapest bridges around, and GFS generally has a rep for having good stuff. I recently purchased one for a project, but haven't used it yet, so I can't say if it works well. Only cost about $15, though, so go for it. It's totally non-invasive. Just make sure you measure your studs and get one that fits exactly.
#9
Unless you've the proper tools and experience I'd recommend one with pre-notched saddles.
Moving on.....
#10
thanks a lot guys for your help, i'm going to try the new bridge.
Just curious but has anyone ever heard of this intonation problem as it doesn't seem like anyones talking about it? (maybe cheap guitar faults lol)
#11
Quote by chopped-in-half
thanks a lot guys for your help, i'm going to try the new bridge.
Just curious but has anyone ever heard of this intonation problem as it doesn't seem like anyones talking about it? (maybe cheap guitar faults lol)

I have not heard of a bridge saddle getting that worn down that it can no longer intonate, so I'm just going by what you are saying. Without some decent pics it's hard to do more than guess, so that might be why there are few responders.
Water which is too pure has no fish - Ts'ai Ken T'an