#2
an acoustic
Höhner llx100g
Gibson explorer
crappy stagg acoustic
Roland dac80d
marshall jcm 900 sl-x 2500
marshall 1960A
ehx metal-muff
jimmy hendrix wah
#3
Need more pics. There's hundreds of different guitars that could be. Serial would be helpful too.
#4
Quote by consecutive e
Need more pics. There's hundreds of different guitars that could be. Serial would be helpful too.



yeah, I am working on that... It is a classified add.
The seller got it from grandpa and wants $150 obo...
I have yet to successfully contact the seller.
#5
Quote by drjoeshmoe
yeah, I am working on that... It is a classified add.
The seller got it from grandpa and wants $150 obo...
I have yet to successfully contact the seller.

Sounds fishy as hell.
#6
Quote by consecutive e
Sounds fishy as hell.



Got a call back..
It is an Airline....
No thanks!
#7
Could be A fake. It might of been some sort of a custom acoustic gibson guitar.

Although I say its a custom/fake because

1.the bridge is used in mostly a ephiphone emperor (which is electric).

2. If its acoustic (or electric), Where's the sound hole/pickup?
the stretchy yam
e|----x-----|
b|----5-----|
g|----x-----|
d|----10---|
a|----0-----|
e|----0-----|
An unnecessary Am chord

I has Encore strat, specail 2 les paul, a classic guitar, ebow, Vox v845 Classic wah wah pedal WBO pedal
#9
Quote by jamesclark111
Could be A fake. It might of been some sort of a custom acoustic gibson guitar.

Although I say its a custom/fake because

1.the bridge is used in mostly a ephiphone emperor (which is electric).

2. If its acoustic (or electric), Where's the sound hole/pickup?


First off, it's an archtop, secondly the sound hole(s) are the F shaped holes on both sides of the bodies(pickups can vary from a bridge p/u to a transducer, even a mounted P90 like mine), and last but not least that bridge is used in many, many types of instruments, including archtops, which have been around for a very long time, and they're not uncommon at all or specific to Epiphone what-so-ever.

The seller never claimed the guitar to be a Gibson, seemed to me the poster was asking, hence the question mark. I would have paid $150, those Airline archtops are awesome guitars, if you like that sort of tone, and I for one do. I have so many problems with this thread, like dissing that archtop because it's an Airline, it's how a guitar sounds and plays that makes it worth anything, especially anywhere in that price range, have you ever priced out an archtop, you should. It's funny that alot of famous musicians use those old Harmony, Airline, Kay, and Epiphone archtops, and can be considered well sought after and are in rare commodity these days.
#11
Quote by obeythepenguin
Seller said it's an Airline, so it's an Airline. End of thread.

For the benefit of the clueless (i.e., most of the other posters):

Other companies made archtops besides Epiphone and Gibson. In the big band days, roughly '40s - '50s, they were at the height of their popularity, and everyone and their brother played them. Many famous players, like Pete Townshend, first learned to play on archtop guitars. There were a number of manufacturers making inexpensive models then; this is one of them.

It's not a Gibson. For one, that's not a Gibson headstock, inlay pattern, or finish. For another, the seller already said it was an Airline.

It's not an Epiphone, and certainly not an Epiphone Blackstone -- anyone with half a brain can see the two guitars look absolutely nothing alike, besides that they're both acoustic archtops. And again, the seller already said it was an Airline. Owned this idiot.

The tailpiece is rarely a reliable way of identifying a particular guitar. Many manufacturers used similar tailpiece designs, and some -- like Gibson -- even used different tailpieces on the same model. A number of guitars have had their tailpiece replaced, especially electrics where it's been swapped for a Bigsby.

Granted, some tailpieces are a dead giveaway -- D'Angelico / D'Aquisto (the real things, not the Fender brand); Gibson Switchmaster/Citation; Rickenbacker "R"; Gretsch "G"; Guild harp; and a number of others. But the generic trapeze, or even the more distinctive Epiphone Frequensator and "finger" designs, don't tell much by themselves.

Any questions?

i have one!

what bug crawled up your ass?
gee im so sorry i was wrong
#12
Quote by obeythepenguin
Seller said it's an Airline, so it's an Airline. End of thread.

For the benefit of the clueless (i.e., most of the other posters):

Other companies made archtops besides Epiphone and Gibson. In the big band days, roughly '40s - '50s, they were at the height of their popularity, and everyone and their brother played them. Many famous players, like Pete Townshend, first learned to play on archtop guitars. There were a number of manufacturers making inexpensive models then; this is one of them.

It's not a Gibson. For one, that's not a Gibson headstock, inlay pattern, or finish. For another, the seller already said it was an Airline.

It's not an Epiphone, and certainly not an Epiphone Blackstone -- anyone with half a brain can see the two guitars look absolutely nothing alike, besides that they're both acoustic archtops. And again, the seller already said it was an Airline. Owned this idiot.

The tailpiece is rarely a reliable way of identifying a particular guitar. Many manufacturers used similar tailpiece designs, and some -- like Gibson -- even used different tailpieces on the same model. A number of guitars have had their tailpiece replaced, especially electrics where it's been swapped for a Bigsby.

Granted, some tailpieces are a dead giveaway -- D'Angelico / D'Aquisto (the real things, not the Fender brand); Gibson Switchmaster/Citation; Rickenbacker "R"; Gretsch "G"; Guild harp; and a number of others. But the generic trapeze, or even the more distinctive Epiphone Frequensator and "finger" designs, don't tell much by themselves.

Any questions?


Why are you such a smart ****?

Sorry for the language by the way