#1
Quick question, what makes a key natural? Such as (in my case) Natural harmonic minor, etc.. I wouldn't say that I'm a pro at theory, but given a key, I can work with it easily, build chords, do any variations of harmony, etc., but have never understood what makes a key natural.. And before anyone says use the search function, I did, and lurked around the lesson threads, and didn't find an answer.. Thanks in advance, guys.
#2
There's the natural minor scale (1 2 b3 4 5 b6 b7), harmonic minor scale (1 2 b3 4 5 b6 7) and melodic minor scale (1 2 b3 4 5 6 7), but I'm not sure what you're talking about.
#3
I think you're looking a bit too far into it... a natural key is a key that does not borrow notes from another scale.

For example, as blue_strat pointed out, you have the natural minor. Let's look at the A minor scale: A B C D E F G (1 2 b3 4 5 b6 b7). This is the natural minor because it conforms to the natural pattern of W-H-W-W-H-W-W.

Now, take the natural minor and raise the seventh, and you've altered the scale, effectively making it the harmonic minor -- which is to say, it is no longer natural. The expected whole step (major second) between the 6th and 7th has become a minor third (or a whole step plus a half step).

Most of the time, you won't need to denote whether a key is natural or not. It's usually implied.
Last edited by freakstylez at Aug 18, 2010,
#4
Quote by freakstylez
Most of the time, you won't need to denote whether a key is natural or not. It's usually implied.


Yeah, the natural minor scale is really just the minor scale, not the harmonic minor or melodic minor. Don't worry about it
#5
Ah, groovy. I really was just looking at it too hard. Thanks for the info!
Last edited by X V I I at Aug 18, 2010,
#6
Quote by X V I I
Ah, I see. So a natural key is just a key in its normal pattern, unaltered?


That it is.

The distinction, as far as I know, exists ONLY because of the three minor keys -- the natural, the harmonic, and the melodic. It's usually a safe bet to say that "A minor" is going to be "A natural minor" -- however, "A harmonic minor" or "A melodic minor" are never just "A minor."

#7
Quote by freakstylez
That it is.

The distinction, as far as I know, exists ONLY because of the three minor keys -- the natural, the harmonic, and the melodic. It's usually a safe bet to say that "A minor" is going to be "A natural minor" -- however, "A harmonic minor" or "A melodic minor" are never just "A minor."



Mmkay. Makes plenty of sense now, so thank you much for clarifying that for me!
#8
Quote by X V I I
Quick question, what makes a key natural? Such as (in my case) Natural harmonic minor, etc.. I wouldn't say that I'm a pro at theory, but given a key, I can work with it easily, build chords, do any variations of harmony, etc., but have never understood what makes a key natural.. And before anyone says use the search function, I did, and lurked around the lesson threads, and didn't find an answer.. Thanks in advance, guys.



If it's the same as a natural note, it's the presence of no #/b

I'm not sure what you exactly mean by that term.

Sean