#1
Do extended scale guitars just have more space between the frets, if they don't have extra frets of course?
Also, this is sorta related, how do baritone guitars work? I'm wondering because I was recently looking at guitars online and saw a a baritone guitar with a 28 inch scale and 24 frets and another guitar which was 30 inches and had 22 frets. I always thought that the length of the neck determined the pitch range but I guess that's not it.
#2
Scale length determines the width of the frets. The longer your scale length, the wider your frets will be. The less frets you have, the wider your frets will be.

So a 30" scale with 22 frets will be giant compared to a 28" scale with 24.

The length of the neck doesn't affect the "pitch range" by itself, the number of frets does.

Also, how baritones work? Well, the longer your scale length is, the more tension is put on strings. When you downtune from standard, your strings have less and less tension. So the point of a baritone is to offset that tension, and make it possible and easy to tune very low, lower than guitars with standard scales can handle well.
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#3
Scale length and the number of frets are completely independent. It just depends on how the guitar is made, some manufacturers will make them with 22 frets, some with 24.
Extended range guitars have a longer scale length, which helps to add tension in the strings, and they're primarily made for downtuning, because the longer scale helps to stop the strings turning to rubber bands when you downtune without using massive strings.
#4
Quote by Offworld92
Scale length determines the width of the frets. The longer your scale length, the wider your frets will be. The less frets you have, the wider your frets will be.

So a 30" scale with 22 frets will be giant compared to a 28" scale with 24.

The length of the neck doesn't affect the "pitch range" by itself, the number of frets does.

Also, how baritones work? Well, the longer your scale length is, the more tension is put on strings. When you downtune from standard, your strings have less and less tension. So the point of a baritone is to offset that tension, and make it possible and easy to tune very low, lower than guitars with standard scales can handle well.



Everything you said +1

I would also add that baritone necks do have a different tone than your standards.