#1
I bought a thumb rest today expecting ease for installing it on my 1960's Fender Jazz Bass, but there are no holes on the guitar to install the Thumb Rest on my bass (the same place as the '62 bass, near the G string). so can anyone give me a template for that idea? and how should i install it? go to guitar center and get them to do it, or just wing it? thanks in advance
#2
The stock 1960's J-bass came with a factory installed tug bar. If your bass is of that vintage, yet no screw holes are visible, you probably have an aftermarket pickguard. There should be holes in the body.
Photos of 1960 Jazz + '59 prototype w/tugbar...
http://admin.fender.com/uk//news/index.php?display_article=272
Ebay pickguard with screw holes. A little creative photo manipulation might render a template.
http://cgi.ebay.com/Fender-62-Jazz-J-Bass-Guitar-Pickguard-Faux-Tortoise-/400126412185?pt=Guitar_Accessories
A '66 P-bass with screws, no tugbar.
#4
Quote by OtamotPuhctek
The stock 1960's J-bass came with a factory installed tug bar. If your bass is of that vintage, yet no screw holes are visible, you probably have an aftermarket pickguard. There should be holes in the body.
Photos of 1960 Jazz + '59 prototype w/tugbar...
http://admin.fender.com/uk//news/index.php?display_article=272
Ebay pickguard with screw holes. A little creative photo manipulation might render a template.
http://cgi.ebay.com/Fender-62-Jazz-J-Bass-Guitar-Pickguard-Faux-Tortoise-/400126412185?pt=Guitar_Accessories
A '66 P-bass with screws, no tugbar.


so check to see if i have holes in my body and not in my pickguard. so in theory which means i would only have to get a new pickguard. or drill them.

http://bass-guitars.musiciansfriend.com/product/Fender-60s-Jazz-Bass?sku=502778

thats it if it will help you
#5
I'm confused, Thumb Rest, right?

If so, just position it where you want, and drill holes for the screws in the guitar, as there are already holes in the rest itself, then just screw it on.


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RBY CYOA
#6
a thumb rest and a tug bar are very similar but serve different purposes. a thumb rest is a place for a bassist to rest their thumb when they are plucking closer to the neck since they can't rest it on the pick up. a tug bar dates back to the days when using the thumb as a pick was the norm. people would use their fingers to hang onto the bar and "tug" so that they could pluck a string with their thumb
no sir away a papaya war is on
#7
Quote by jonseyisgod
so check to see if i have holes in my body and not in my pickguard. so in theory which means i would only have to get a new pickguard. or drill them.
http://bass-guitars.musiciansfriend.com/product/Fender-60s-Jazz-Bass?sku=502778
thats it if it will help you

Oh, sorry. I thought you were referring to an actual 1960 vintage Jazz.
The photo in your link clearly shows what would be the screw holes for the stock tugbar.
I would drill a hole for ONE screw through the pickguard first. Then a pilot hole in the wood, which, given the amount of wood in the area, probably isn't necessary for that size screw, but wouldn't hurt either. Attach the TB with one screw and use the factory marking on the PG to lay out the TB angle. Use the mounting hole in the TB to mark the PG as it may not exactly match the PG's. Repeat drilling process.
This is how I would approach it.
I'm not a luthier.
I don't play one on TV.
#8
Quote by OtamotPuhctek
Oh, sorry. I thought you were referring to an actual 1960 vintage Jazz.
The photo in your link clearly shows what would be the screw holes for the stock tugbar.
I would drill a hole for ONE screw through the pickguard first. Then a pilot hole in the wood, which, given the amount of wood in the area, probably isn't necessary for that size screw, but wouldn't hurt either. Attach the TB with one screw and use the factory marking on the PG to lay out the TB angle. Use the mounting hole in the TB to mark the PG as it may not exactly match the PG's. Repeat drilling process.
This is how I would approach it.
I'm not a luthier.
I don't play one on TV.



sorry for all the questions but what about splitting the wood or PG? and the picture lies. there are no holes.
#9
I'd make the PG hole a hair larger than the screw so it passes through easily. The pilot hole in the wood should be about the size of the screw shaft. Maybe a little smaller if the screw has fine threads. Best to start small and go bigger if need be.