#1
Well I've been studying music theory for a while now. I dominate intervals, major and minor scales construction, chord construction (basic... Triads and seventh chords, and I know how to build other chords but I haven't trained yet), building chords out of major/minor scales, and I use pentatonics sometimes, and some exotic scales too. I've studied the modes too and I can already create a few things, but I only know the basic. I was wondering what can I study more in order to become a more complete guitarist. I know how to read partitures too, even though I haven't trained it (I think I don't need to...).

Thanks
#2
you seem to know quite a bit.

i would usggest maybe studying classical and jazz pieces and seeing how the theory is put into practise (even if you dont play anything)
#3
Quote by '93
you seem to know quite a bit.

i would usggest maybe studying classical and jazz pieces and seeing how the theory is put into practise (even if you dont play anything)
Good advice.

I'd have to agree, you should work on studying/analyzing music. You may actually come across something new. In that case, you would study it harder and learn about it. When I started to listen to/analyze Radiohead's music, it pretty much turned around my perspective on chord progressions.

Also, you're going to want to put what you already know into application. As you practice improvisation/composition, you should notice a difference that knowledge of theory makes, especially when it's coupled with analysis of other music.
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea
#4
Quote by Duarteman
I was wondering what can I study more in order to become a more complete guitarist.
Concerning guitar, I can't help you. I am a lousy one myself. But concerning composition, you could start learning the rules to create chord progressions, and how the different voices can and cannot move.

I believe this knowledge would probably help you understand parts as a rythm guitarst, and help you improvise as a lead guitarist, and even help you understand the importance of the bass guitar.

I recently bought Walter Piston's Harmony fifth edition, and I think it's one of the best books on the matter in English. You can read an earlier scanned edition here.
#5
Grab a real book, and analyse chord progressions of jazz standards in terms of how they fit diatonically e.g. their scale degrees within the certain key

also, finding where the melody fits in a specific chord

THEN you could just blast these chord progressions until they became another language and make songwriting a breeze

OR you could just bash your head against a wall

its your call!

EDIT: (Im sure the latter worked for Kerry King)
Quote by BlitzkriegAir
1. Get drunk
2. play pentatonic scales fast
3. throw in some divebombs and pinch harmonics
4. Get killed onstage
5. become legendary guitarist instantaneously


Quote by Holy Katana

How dare you attack the greatness of the augmented sixth?
#6
Let's cut through the BS...

Quote by Duarteman
I was wondering what can I study more in order to become a more complete guitarist.


1. Study the application of what you know. Turn knowledge in to wisdom.

2. Exercise creativity so one day you might be able to write a song or two instead of worrying so much about the theory you know.

3. Train your ear for the same purpose as #2.
“Science cannot solve the ultimate mystery of nature. And that is because, in the last analysis, we ourselves are part of nature and therefore part of the mystery that we are trying to solve.”


-Max Planck

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