#1
Ok so I have what I believe is a pickup problem. I've found a few similar posts on here and other places of people with a similar problem, but there's was usually caused by the switch.
A friend is letting me borrow his guitar to mess around with.
It's a Gibson Baldwin Signiture Series. Only one humbucker, at bridge position, two volume knobs, and no switches.
When I got the guitar home, I plugged into both my amps, and whether the volume is up or down on the guitar, it makes no noise. I adjusted the pick up height closer to the strings and it makes a very very faint string sound, but only if I have it on the drive channel or turn the volume way up on the clean channel. On the drive channel the sound has no distortion.
The guitar looks fairly new, still really good condition.
Any idea what the problem is and how I can fix it?
#2
Sounds like a wiring problem. Something is being grounded or shorted where it shouldn't, but a very small amount of signal is still getting through, which is why you can hear it on the drive channel/with the volume up really high.
#4
return it for another one
HILT!

Where's Waldo?

#5
Do you have access to an ohmmeter or multimeter?
Endorsed by Dean Guitars 07-10
2003 Gibson Flying V w/ Moon Inlay
2006 Fender All-American Partscaster
SVK ELP-C500 Custom

1964 Fender Vibro Champ
1989 Peavey VTM60

[thread="1166208"]Gibsons Historic Designs[/thread]
#6
A short like could be anywhere but easy to find. Unscrew the back look for something disconnected or touching two it shdnt be (instead of one). If it's not there it cd be the jack , but a little brains and persistence. U don't know the prob now but maybe u will so keep it plugd in, unscrew back, touch wires here and there. Somewhere the circuit is close but ain't right, good chance at easy fix. Take pix if u don't figure it out and post for help.
#7
^Your post is hard to read, but I can somewhat follow it

I had a major grounding problem on my Flying V when I first got it. I had that thing apart countless times trying to figure out what was up with it, took it to three different guitar techs and countless other musicians, etc. Finally I took it to the last guitar store I could think of; a little maw and paw shop. The owner checked it out and fixed it in like 2 minutes... the capacitor on the tone pot was shorting out by touching the pot case. That drove me completely up the wall for weeks!
Endorsed by Dean Guitars 07-10
2003 Gibson Flying V w/ Moon Inlay
2006 Fender All-American Partscaster
SVK ELP-C500 Custom

1964 Fender Vibro Champ
1989 Peavey VTM60

[thread="1166208"]Gibsons Historic Designs[/thread]
#8
Quote by Khriss Bliss
A short like could be anywhere but easy to find. Unscrew the back look for something disconnected or touching two it shdnt be (instead of one). If it's not there it cd be the jack , but a little brains and persistence. U don't know the prob now but maybe u will so keep it plugd in, unscrew back, touch wires here and there. Somewhere the circuit is close but ain't right, good chance at easy fix. Take pix if u don't figure it out and post for help.


don`t use mobile text language in a forum.......bad web etiquette and annoying as hell and will only result in people not reading your posts.

it`s a wiring issue.

the baldwin guitars are a cheap version of gibsons but actually are a cheap version of epiphone, if epiphones have wiring issues then these most certainly will.

the toggle switch and so pots could do with a upgrade, but 1st you need to find the broken ground connection.

the easy way is look for a wire that`s soldered or looks like it should be soldered to anything metal on the guitar, so the bridge, pickups, pots, switch...it won`t look like it`s connected to part of the electrical circuit but just randomly soldered on metal parts (kind of hard to explain)
#9
**** that's kind of hard to understand too.
So what your saying is I'm looking for a wire that used to be soldered to a metal part but is not anymore?