#1
A couple weeks ago I got an aux input installed in my car for my ipod. It works great but I've noticed that when I use it the bass is REALLY REALLY loud and obnoxious. I'm confused as to why this is. One thing I noticed is that the Y-cable they used is like a shit radio shack brand. Could that be part of the reason? I have a Monster brand y-cable in my room that I could switch it out with if that would fix it. I know I can just turn down the bass but I don't think I should have to because any other time if I'm listening to a CD or using an fm-transmitter I have bass full. Anybody have any thoughts?
#2
EQ setting on your ipod?
Nothing of me is original. I am the combined effort of everybody I've ever known.

¨°º¤ø„¸¸„ø¤º°¨
#3
i could be that its an ipod, they always boost the bass signal unless you shut off the bass boost in the ipod eq/settings
People in the pit take my post way too seriously.

MyAnimeList
7-String Legion

If you have a question PM me and I will always get back to you.
#4
Quote by Deadlock Riff
i could be that its an ipod, they always boost the bass signal unless you shut off the bass boost in the ipod eq/settings

No the factory EQ isn't bass boost. Never use the bass boost EQ on your iPod it will ruin your headphones/earbuds unless they are good quality.
Guitar:
Jackson DX10D Dinky
Ibanez Tone Blaster 150w head
Line Six 4x12 cab
Marshall MG10CD
Dunlop Crybaby from Hell

Bass:
Ibanez ATK
Random ass EQ thing that's not even a real bass amp
1x18 2x10 cab
#5
It might just be your iPod?

Makes me grateful that my old friend Mr. Cassette Player and his associate Mr. Adapter Thingy That Looks Like a Tape With A Wire Attached haven't let me down yet.
#6
Quote by Deadlock Riff
i could be that its an ipod, they always boost the bass signal unless you shut off the bass boost in the ipod eq/settings


That could be a possibility but it would've came through real bassy when I used the fm-transmitter with it, which it didn't. I dunno
#7
When you use FM transmitters the eq on the ipod/volume on the ipod doesn't matter, so maybe its different when its plugged in to the aux.
Dead soldier! Go now to Valhalla!
#8
When I use my iPod in the car I've noticed the bass is a little more intense too. Can you adjust the EQ on your car's console? If your car isn't that old, you should be able to tinker with the levels.
#9
I always have to change the eq on my MP3 depending on what I'm listening to it through. Just choose the Boost Reducer option on your ipod eq setting when listening to it in the car
Last edited by Duffman123 at Aug 20, 2010,
#10
Quote by Duffman123
I always have to change the eq on my MP3 for different depending on what I'm listening to it through. Just choose the Boost Reducer option on your ipod eq setting when listening to it in the car


+1

Change your EQ depending what you're doing.

Epiphone Les Paul Standard w/ SD Alnico Pro II's
Fender Aerodyne Telecaster & Stratocaster
Marshall JCM 800 4104 combo


E-Married to Funny_Page
#11
I would leave the iPod EQ setting flat, aka None. Then mess with the EQ on your car console. Might as well use your Monster cable, too. You shouldn't have the bass turned all the way up, anyway.
E-married to ilikepirates

Quote by bloodtrocuted93

How are you so fucking awesome at music?


>¦<
¦
#12
I think the problem here is how your different devices hook up to the iPod.

If your FM transmitter hooks up to the iPod through the bottom port (the one that the USB computer cable goes into) then the iPod's EQ won't affect it. The audio that leaves that port is a line out style signal (it has a set voltage/volume and flat EQ slope) rather than being the same as the headphone output.

It can provide a cleaner sound in a car audio system too as the signal is stronger.
If you hook it up to headphones it will be louder than if they were plugged into the headphone jack at full volume (trust me, I've done it). So, not only will it need less amplification but it should be less affected by interference. It's also matched to the higher impedance of the stereo receiver (AUX-in) rather than that of headphones, further helping address the problem.

I have the same problem in my cars, in my Yaris it used to be very boomey and bass-heavy due to the iPod's EQ and the head unit's EQ doubling up. Some head units actually save a different EQ for each mode - so, if you set a bassy EQ for CDs then it won't apply to the radio or the AUX input. I know my Yaris and the Kenwood source in my Holden EH have this feature. The Axis unit in my old Datsun didn't though.

Basically, unless your car's source unit has the above function then your best bet is to set the iPod's EQ to flat or even bass cut. Either that or buy an iPod line-out cable off ebay.

Oh, and I doubt it would have anything to do with the cables. As far as car audio goes, 'better' (expensive) cables usually make bugger all difference. Unless you have a full audiophile system in your car then you won't be able to tell the difference; even then I reckon you'd struggle.
Last edited by JohnnoEH at Aug 20, 2010,
#14
Quote by tubatom868686
Why would you want less bass

I know what he means. When the volume of the radio in my friends car starts to raise to bass starts to become over powering and sound very muffled