#1
Ok, i realize that this idea is probably immensely retarded; however, i thought of it today, and I was wondering if it was possible.

So yea, I was looking at the back of my strat where I have a ground leading to where my springs hook onto for the tremolo, and I was wondering: would it be possible to use those in a spring reverb configuration? Yea, you would have to get a fixed bridge, insulate and all that jazz, but the basic premise behind a spring reverb is to just run the signal through a spring right? Once again, I have no idea about the construction of a spring reverb unit, nor am i even planning on doing this, but i was just wondering.

thanks lol
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#2
I don't know enough to explain, but no, it doesn't work like that. Would be nice though
#3
daw, my dreams are ruined.... I figured it wouldn't work seeing as my reverb tanks are pretty large... i guess you could duct tape one to the back of the guitar lol
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#4
I'm not really sure at all, but I think the sound from the amp vibrates a spring which gives the reverb sound. Or something like that

EDIT:
"A spring reverb system uses a transducer at one end of a spring and a pickup at the other, similar to those used in plate reverbs, to create and capture vibrations within a metal spring. Guitar amplifiers frequently incorporate spring reverbs due to their compact construction and low cost. Spring reverberators were once widely used in semi-professional recording due to their modest cost and small size."
Last edited by zgbgydug at Aug 20, 2010,
#6
I guess this may be a little late but the short answer is that you cant do it. the springs in a reverb tank are very loose and low-tension so they can vibrate freely. trem springs are quite the opposite.
#7
^Well, i mean, they wouldn't have to stay at that tension, and you could use different springs since the bridge would no longer be connected to them, but yea, i'm assuming the point still stands that it wouldn't work.
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#8
Whaaaa? You could make a different unit that doesn't use trem springs and it could work. I'd get a pair of very cheap small headphones and a loose spring. glue the spring ends to each of the little headphone speakers. Then get a small headphone amp, and drive the send and return 'transducer' (aka headphone speaker) with different channels. Then figure out a mixing system.

But of course that wouldn't be extremely awesome sounding I'm sure. But going off the fact that you thought of using trem springs, I doubt that perfect refined tone is your goal.
Last edited by LeviMan_2001 at Aug 21, 2010,
#9
to do this, you'd have to block off the trem permanently and build a reverb driver/recovery circuit and find a tiny reverb tank. You'll have to put a resistor in series with the guitar's output signal and put the driver/recovery circuit across that resistor. the resistor will drop most of the guitar's output so you'll have to address that. you'll want a reverb level pot so wire the recovery circuit with a volume pot. putting the circuit in series with the guitar signal would givew 100% wet signal, which sounds terrible.

idk if they even make tanks that small so you'd need one of those digital spring reverb modules made by belkin or accutronics or w/e. popular opinion is that you cant tell it from a real spring tank.
#10
Even if it did work, remember that whenever you bang/drop/move an amp with spring reverb while the reverb is on, you get this super loud and unpleasant crashing sound. I imagine if you had a tank contained in the guitar you'd have to stand pretty dang still whenever you play it.
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