#1
So I found out my recorder/interface thing has a metronome on it. Only difference in that you can increase the speed in tenths (25.0, 25.1, 25.2). So I was thinking that this might be a really good way to build up speed because the changes are so minimal you don't even notice it.

Thoughts?

Is this a really good way (better then just increasing by 1's)?
The same?
Worse?
#2
It'll take longer, and increasing by 1's isn't that noticeable anyway.
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#3
I'd say its not worth it. Its probably better that you DO notice it anyway. Try increasing by fives.
#4
i would keep it in the whole numbers only.

usually 1-5 works



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#6
Quote by Bad Kharmel
If you can learn speed by technique the BPM won't matter at all
Sorry to be almost picking on your advice on these boards, but please explain what you mean more thoroughly. As for my advice, I would start extremely slow and then up the BPM by increments of 1 (Whole units) when you become comfortable. (Remember to maintain good posture and tension free.) This is assuming your recording interface is using BPM and not measured time. (Bars/Seconds/Minutes/Whatever.)
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Last edited by Arpeggio X at Aug 21, 2010,
#7
Quote by Arpeggio X
Sorry to be almost picking on your advice on these boards, but please explain what you mean more thoroughly. As for my advice, I would start extremely slow and then up the BPM by increments of 1 when you become comfortable. (Remember to maintain good posture and tension free.)

What I mean is that if you can learn to plant, tremelo pick, sweep, and tap, then it really doesn;t matter how fast the song is, if you can follow your drummer/have any sewnse of rythm then it really doesn't matter the actual tempo of the song, cause your just following along (it makes for really tight solos)
#8
Humans generally have a inherent bad sense of timing. A metronome click is important for this reason, it never wavers in it's rythym as a human may do; therefore making you tighter than you could ever be otherwise. It has nothing to do with technique.
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Last edited by Arpeggio X at Aug 21, 2010,
#9
Quote by Arpeggio X
Humans generally have a inherently bad sense of timing. A metronome click is important for this reason, it never wavers in it's rythym as a human may do; therefore making you tighter than you could ever be otherwise. It has nothing to do with technique.


This. And just because you can do those things at one tempo doesn't mean you can do them cleanly at any tempo.
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#10
Quote by Arpeggio X
Humans generally have a inherent bad sense of timing. A metronome click is important for this reason, it never wavers in it's rythym as a human may do; therefore making you tighter than you could ever be otherwise. It has nothing to do with technique.

but if you can follow a drummer, then following a metronome really isn't that important, they are truly the same thing, but its more important to copy yur drummer's feel (unless of course you plan on performing with a metronome instead of drums) its not hard to follow a rythm a metronome is just 1 method, and is not inherently necessary, however if you learn real technique than the speed no longer matter as the sky itself is the limit
#11
A drummer can also have a bad sense of timing, do you not realize that? Not necessary, but is a massive help in every regard, there's no reason to forsake it and be sloppy. As for the techniques, they still don't matter in this context.
I.E. I can alternate and sweep pick moderately well, but can I do it at 16th notes at 200 BPM cleanly? Can I hell. That requires me to analyze every aspect of my technique whilst playing at a slow speed and bring it up to whatever tempo I want. It doesn't REQUIRE a metronome, but I acknowledge my timing can never be as good as a machine's, so I use one.
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Last edited by Arpeggio X at Aug 21, 2010,
#12
Quote by Arpeggio X
A drummer can also have a bad sense of timing, do you not realize that? Not necessary, but is a massive help in every regard, there's no reason to forsake it and be sloppy. As for the techniques, they still don't matter in this context.
I.E. I can alternate and sweep pick moderately well, but can I do it at 16th notes at 200 BPM cleanly? Can I hell. That requires me to analyze every aspect of my technique whilst playing at a slow speed and bring it up to whatever tempo I want. It doesn't REQUIRE a metronome, but I acknowledge my timing can never be as good as a machine's, so I use one.

If your timing is better than the drummers and you decide not to follow him then you will sound incredibly sloppy, and if the rest of your group are all going on their own timing then the band will be aweful, you need to be able to follow your drummer even if he's off, even with advanced techinique
#13
Thanks for the thoughts but I think I'll keep practicing this way, it helps me relax a lot. I just increased about 20 bpm without even really noticing it!!
#14
Quote by Bad Kharmel
If your timing is better than the drummers and you decide not to follow him then you will sound incredibly sloppy, and if the rest of your group are all going on their own timing then the band will be aweful, you need to be able to follow your drummer even if he's off, even with advanced techinique

I understand the dynamics of a band and the amount of leeway a drummer can have in that context. If I believed my sense of timing was better than my drummer's I wouldn't play in a band with him, as it'd make him incompetent at his job. I still stand by my metronome though.
Sorry if our little tirade has knocked the thread off track a little. Long story short, it's up to you which increment you use. I suggest a small one so that there's not much effort required between plateaus if you will, but not too small you can't notice any improvement.
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Last edited by Arpeggio X at Aug 21, 2010,