#1
Hey guys, playing classical music since I was like 7 I've grown used to the little details in music. So when I hear the little extra notes these two players add, not saying they are the only ones, but I love the little extra notes they add that go with the chords.

I watched some lessons, and some vids from Frusciante on youtube, he talked about why he played the bass of the chord with his thumb etc.

I'm not trying to be exactly like those guys with the thumb covering the bass a lot of the time, I have big hands/ long fingers, but any tips for playing that(w/o thumb on bass strings) way or is that the only way to barre up the neck and have freedom to add those little notes?

I can fool around with my free fingers on open chords, I'm still a beginner just starting to be able to barre the index way though.

http://free-loops.com/tv-23-john-frusciante-guitar-lessons.html
Last edited by weteath at Aug 21, 2010,
#2
"playing classical music since I was like 7"
"I'm still a beginner just starting to be able to barre the index way though."

...?
#3
Do whatever sounds good. If you can't add flourishes on a normal barre chord without turning it into a 7 chord or something, then use your thumb.

I'm also a big fan of the thumb over the top style, but sometimes you just need that low 5th in the chord for it to sound right (in which case I would go for a normal barre).
PPPPPPPOSTFINDER
#4
could you link that video up there please? im a big JF fan.

The thumb/bar chord thing: nothing for it other than practice - it gives a nice open sound though.

learn these songs, they all use the 'add in the notes' chord manipulation technique:

Pearl Jam - yellow Ledbetter
Jimi Hendrix - Little Wing
Jimi Hendrix - The wind cries Mary.


Good luck, and keep us posted!
I assure you its brilliant!
#5
You don't have to use your thumb at all. It's optional.

I am in the process of adding a how-to post on exactly this thing within the next few days. Both Hendrix and Frusciante play in a very laid-back, rhythm style with 'fill in' notes to embellish the chords. They employ several ideas and once you master these, you will get that sound you are looking for.

Watch this space: http://www.theloneguitaristblog.com

Willem
#6
Quote by Zeletros
"playing classical music since I was like 7"
"I'm still a beginner just starting to be able to barre the index way though."

...?

Sorry lol, I've played clarinet and trombone, and I'm new to guitar is what o meant.
#7
Quote by willemhdb
You don't have to use your thumb at all. It's optional.

I am in the process of adding a how-to post on exactly this thing within the next few days. Both Hendrix and Frusciante play in a very laid-back, rhythm style with 'fill in' notes to embellish the chords. They employ several ideas and once you master these, you will get that sound you are looking for.

Watch this space: http://www.theloneguitaristblog.com

Willem

Thanks I'm checkin it right now
#8
Quote by Metacaster
could you link that video up there please? im a big JF fan.

The thumb/bar chord thing: nothing for it other than practice - it gives a nice open sound though.

learn these songs, they all use the 'add in the notes' chord manipulation technique:

Pearl Jam - yellow Ledbetter
Jimi Hendrix - Little Wing
Jimi Hendrix - The wind cries Mary.


Good luck, and keep us posted!

I just searched John frusciante tips on YouTube and the two vids from him pop up. He shows under the bridge than talks a bit, then there is second video. I can't post a link ATM on my iPod touch. I will post it in the morning when I hop on my pc
#10
Quote by willemhdb
As promised, I have written a post on how to get that Hendrix/Frusciante style rhythm sound. There's two simple chord extension ideas that you should know, and the rest should then fall into place.

Please have a look at http://www.theloneguitaristblog.com/beginner/jimi-hendrix-teach-rhythm-guitar/

Cheers,
Willem


let me tell you from prior experience this is a great simple article to get you on your feet with the whole style.
#11
Quote by Funk Monk
let me tell you from prior experience this is a great simple article to get you on your feet with the whole style.


Thank you very much. Hope everyone likes it.
#12
Thanks man, I peeked at your other vids from the blog too, I'm soaking in all I can then practicing. Love the sound of using that technique on that vid too man

The dude that wanted to see the Frusciante video, I posted the link in my OP.
Last edited by weteath at Aug 22, 2010,
#13
Quote by willemhdb
As promised, I have written a post on how to get that Hendrix/Frusciante style rhythm sound. There's two simple chord extension ideas that you should know, and the rest should then fall into place.

Please have a look at http://www.theloneguitaristblog.com/beginner/jimi-hendrix-teach-rhythm-guitar/

Cheers,
Willem


That's a great lesson! Covers the basics pretty well, although there are many more chord embellishments than the ones listed here.

TS, here are some songs that use "simpler" chord embellishments. I say "simpler" because, while they're quite difficult, they're a good starting point:

Under The Bridge - RHCP
Little Wing - Jimi Hendrix
Bold As Love - Jimi Hendrix
Yellow Ledbetter - Pearl Jam

There are countless others, but if you learn these songs you'll see how three different guitarists use chord embellishments, and you'll have more licks in this style than you'll know what to do with.

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Quote by Jackal58
Yer pretty fly for a Canadian.
#14
The thumb technique just allows you to play more embellishments.

I think anyone who wants to incorperate rythm AND lead into one style should DEFINETELY learn this technique, its not ripping off its just economical.
#15
Quote by MWriff
The thumb technique just allows you to play more embellishments.

I think anyone who wants to incorperate rythm AND lead into one style should DEFINETELY learn this technique, its not ripping off its just economical.


Agreed. It's just another technique for your repertoire. Being able to go between thumb chords and proper barre chords is a great skill to have.
Fender American Vintage '62 Stratocaster
Gibson Les Paul Custom
TC Electronic Polytune
Danelectro Blue Paisley
EHX Big Muff Pi w/ Tone Wicker
Dunlop Crybaby
EHX Deluxe Memory Boy
Egnater Tweaker

Quote by Jackal58
Yer pretty fly for a Canadian.