#1
Hey. Just read this on wikipedia:

The musical note F-flat is enharmonically equivalent to E natural. It is, however, lower in pitch, F-flat being a perfect fifth below C-flat, whereas E natural being a major third above C.


Confused, I cant see how Fb is lower that E in pitch as they are both exactly the same note!?

Anyone?

Source:- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/F-flat_major
#2
its not saying its lower than E, but lower than F
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Last edited by igordubai at Aug 21, 2010,
#3
Look up tempered tuning. They aren't exactly the same note, but due to a new system introduced suiting pianos, etc. ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Equal_temperament - the pitches are fixed at certain frequencies) which replaced the system favoured by non-fixed pitch instruments such as strings ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Just_intonation - the pitches of notes are relative to the key, set at ratios from one another).

T
#5
The long and short of it is that they are exactly the same in the equal tempered tuning system but not always in other systems.
- and probably/practically way beyond the scope of internet group comments to fully explain why.
In the practical world the guitarist need only treat them as being the same, no harm will be done.
#7
It depends on the key. Start browsing through wikipedia about musical temperament and stuff.
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#8
Yea I see from that link that in other musical systems and octave can be split into more than 12 notes so in that case they would have a different pitch.

So it's nothing to worry about

Cheers.
#9
Quote by Razer86
Yea I see from that link that in other musical systems and octave can be split into more than 12 notes so in that case they would have a different pitch.

So it's nothing to worry about

Cheers.

It's worse than that, even when some systems only use 12 divisions the notes can be at different pitches in different keys, .
Only in equal tempered system are they always the same. Tuning systems and keys can be an interesting area if you have an interest in music theory and an interest in physics.
#10
Quote by R.Christie
It's worse than that, even when some systems only use 12 divisions the notes can be at different pitches in different keys, .
Only in equal tempered system are they always the same. Tuning systems and keys can be an interesting area if you have an interest in music theory and an interest in physics.


Oh god... lol

Might have to have a look into this at some point, but I only started playin in January so theres plenty other things I should be studying first!

Thanks for the replies guys