#1
Hello,

Recently my music teacher at school gave us this sheet music a church songs to learn. She wants me to play the rhythm of the song (on guitar). It's some pretty basic chords but there are some odd ones I don't really understand. I know how to find their chart on the internet but I would much rather know how you alter a regular major/minor chord to change it to one of these.
Examples:

How would you change a G major into a Gadd9?
or an A7 into an A7sus4 or D into Dsus2,4?
or a D into a D2 or G into G6
and is it possible to change an A major into an A7 (dominant of course).

Also what does it mean if a chord is notated with a slash mark? i.e. C/B or D2/C#

Ok, I am by no means asking someone to give me the chord charts or tabs for all these chords. I want someone to tell me what do the abbreviations add to the chord, and how do I alter them to fit.

Thanks,
Aaron
"The mind is everything. What you think, you become."
#2
Basicly it tells you to add or in other ways change a note that will give the chord a different character or sound. Learn the basic major and minor scales and you will be on your way to understand this easily.
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#3
Quote by mardisaaron

How would you change a G major into a Gadd9?
or an A7 into an A7sus4 or D into Dsus2,4?
or a D into a D2 or G into G6
and is it possible to change an A major into an A7 (dominant of course).

Also what does it mean if a chord is notated with a slash mark? i.e. C/B or D2/C#


Gadd9 = Take a G major, and add an A into the chord. A is the second (ninth) degree in G major.

Suspended chords - You replace the third in the chord, for a second or fourth, depending on which one you have.
A7 is A C# E G so for an A7sus4 we need A D E G
Same for D.
Dsus4 = D G A (1 4 5)
Dsus2 = D E A (1 2 5)

Generally the suspension is held from a previous chord, thus it being called suspended. Otherwise I'd call it an add chord.

G6 would be a G with the sixth added to the chord. G B D E (1 3 5 6)
D2 is another name for Dsus2 I believe. Not 100% on this one.

If it's the dominant chord, you can make it into a dominant 7 since that's just extending it another degree. If you're in D, A is the dominant, so you can replace it with A7 and that will have a stronger pull back to the tonic.

The slash mark is for slash notation. The note behind the slash is the bottom note of the chord and it generally represents an inversion. C/B would be a C major with a B in the bass (effectively a Cmaj7 chord if the notes are C E G B)
D2/C# would be a D2 with C# as the lowest note.
Quote by DiminishedFifth
Who's going to stop you? The music police?
Last edited by FacetOfChaos at Aug 21, 2010,
#4
There's differen't chords that make jazz music or spice up music.

The "Sus4" is pretty easy; its when you move the third note of the scale of the chord up to the 4th note (for example: to Make a ESus4 chord, you move your index finger from the 1st fret of the G string to the second fret of the G string)

Same thing with "Sus2"; you move your 3rd note down to the second note ( which I'm afraid, its complicated to explain)

Just use this website to figure it out http://www.chordbook.com/guitarchords.php
the stretchy yam
e|----x-----|
b|----5-----|
g|----x-----|
d|----10---|
a|----0-----|
e|----0-----|
An unnecessary Am chord

I has Encore strat, specail 2 les paul, a classic guitar, ebow, Vox v845 Classic wah wah pedal WBO pedal
#6
Quote by griffRG7321
^That's all correct but that isn't figured bass.

What would it be called? Not really sure of the difference for when it's figured bass or not.

Edit: Okay, thanks guys. I had always written out the chord symbols over the figured bass to make it easier to read so I had forgotten the difference
Quote by DiminishedFifth
Who's going to stop you? The music police?
Last edited by FacetOfChaos at Aug 21, 2010,
#7
Hi Aaron
First of all, sorry if my english is not too good, i'm from Argentina.

How would you change a G major into a Gadd9?
The G major chord is the G (root), B (major 3rd) and D (perfect 5th)
The "add" abbreviation is telling you to add the 9th note to the chord, it's the same note that the 2dn one.
In this case that note would be A.
Then, your Gadd9 chord would be G (root), B (major 3rd), D (perfect 5th) and A (major 9th).

or an A7 into an A7sus4 or D into Dsus2,4?
The A7 chord is A (root), C# (major 3rd), E (perfect 5th) and G (minor 7th).
The "sus4" abbreviation is telling you to remove the 3rd note (in this case B) and add the 4th note (in this case D)
The same idea is with "sus2", but you replace the 3rd with the 2nd.

or a D into a D2 or G into G6
I have never seen a "D2" chord, so i can't help you with that one.
The "G6" chord is the same idea than with a G7 chord, but instead of adding the 7th note, add the 6th.

and is it possible to change an A major into an A7 (dominant of course).
To change an A major chord into an A7m you only have to add the minor 7th to the chord and there you have it.

Also what does it mean if a chord is notated with a slash mark? i.e. C/B or D2/C#
The slash mark means (The chord)/(with bass in this note)
A common example of this is the D/F# chord.
What this means is that you have a D chord, but in the 6th string, you play a F# note.


The trick with the "sus" chords is to put them before the natural chord. What i mean with this is, as an example, put the Dsus4 before the D chord, or the Gsus2 before the Gm.


Hope it helps,
Guido
#10
Welcome to Chord Construction 101!

You're going to need to use the major scale to help you construct these chords.

Gadd9 - To construct a Gadd9, you simply take the notes from a standard G chord (G B D) and add the 9th of the major scale onto them, thus making G B D A. Map these onto your fretboard and voila! Gadd9! My preferred mapping of this is: 320035 (GBDGDA)

A7sus4 - Starting from A7 (A C# E G), you just take the 3rd and sharpen it to the fourth, i.e. to "suspend" it, therefore making A7sus4 = A D E G. My preferred mapping of this is: X05430 (AGBDE)

Dsus2 - Works like above, although as its sus2, you simply suspend by moving the third down to a second. Starting from D (D F# A) you simply change the F# to an E to get Dsus2 (D E A) XX0230. If its Dsus4, then raise to the fourth - (D G A) XX0233.

D2 (D9?) - Never heard of D2, I can only assume that it must be a synonym for D9. To construct D9, you start with D (D F# A) and add not only the 9th, but any odd numbered intervals in-between. This is true for chords such as D11 and D13 also. When adding the 7th, its always Dominant, i.e: b7. So D9 would be D F# A C E, X57570.

G6 - Start with G (G B D) and simply add the 6th of the major scale to it, thus making G6 (G B D E), 320000.

Chords with a slash mark indicate that the Note AFTER the slash MUST be the bass note. Therefore a C/B (C E G B), but the B MUST be the lowest note in the chord. Preferred position = X22010.

Hope this helps
#11
Wow! Thanks everyone!
This really helped me, I now see why I was told to spend so much time learning my intervals ha! I'm glad I did.

Oh and the D2/C# chord in the song I'm learning...since no one here had heard of a D2 I searched it up in google and came to the conclusion that people mistake D2 for being another way to say Dadd9. Because I found the same song in multiple places where all the chords were the same but the D2 was changed to a Dadd9/C#.

Thanks for all the help!

Aaron
"The mind is everything. What you think, you become."