#1
What is an acceptable range of temperatures to keep acoustics in a room?

According to Breedlove my guitar was made and kept in ~ 70 degree temperature, my guitar room is in my basement and can hover around low to mid 60's, is my guitar in danger?
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Last edited by Msword7 at Aug 21, 2010,
#3
Quote by patticake
basically if you're comfortable, so is your guitar.


This
#4
It's not so much the temperature as the humidity that affects the guitar. If the humidity level stays consistent, you'll be fine.
#5
well, not exactly.

humidity is very important when storing a guitar, but if you stick your guitar in an attic, it can get hot enough to soften the glue, and very bad things can happen. or if you leave your guitar in a house in the snow with no heat, it might not be a good idea, either.

Quote by Awfulplayer
It's not so much the temperature as the humidity that affects the guitar. If the humidity level stays consistent, you'll be fine.
#6
Also, it's not so much extremes in temperature (within reason - I'm not talking about 170 deg. F., or -25 deg. F.) that can harm a guitar, it's sudden temperature changes.

What I mean is, your guitar may be perfectly fine at a more or less constant 45 degrees. It may be perfectly fine at a more or less constant 90 degrees. But there's a good chance it'll be harmed if cycles between, between 45 degrees to 90 degrees, in a hurry.

Such situations are sometimes encountered when one buys a nice new guitar via mail order, in winter. The UPS man leaves the guitar outside your front door, on a cold day. You come home a few hours later, bring the box containing the guitar into your nice warm home, and immediately open the box. The guitar - which is very cold from having been sitting outdoors in winter for hours - is now subjected to a sudden and major temperature increase. Result? That the finish will crack is quite possible. (You can avoid this by simply leaving the box unopened for some hours, while the guitar it contains gradually warms up to room temperature.)

Similarly, there are places where daytime temperatures exceed 90 deg. F., but nighttime temps are downright chilly. (Not at all unusual in certain desert environments.) You keep your guitar in a non-temperature controlled space under those conditions, and you're just asking for trouble.

Although I've been talking about sudden temperature swings, sudden humidity swings aren't good for a guitar, either. I mention this, because more than once I've heard some guy explain that he just obtained a hygrometer (ie. a humidity gauge). Gasp! The relative humidity in his living room is really low, what with it being winter and his home's heating system drying the heck out of the air.

Well, he knows that spending weeks in very low humidity has been bad for his guitar, so he gets the bright idea that he ought to put his guitar in the bathroom, turn on the shower (hot water only), and let the steam re-humidify his guitar.

Unfortunately, going from near desert low humidity, to tropical high humidity, in a matter of minutes, is likely to do more harm than good to his guitar. Wood tends to warp under such rapid humidity changes.

As a practical thing, I tend to keep my guitars in my living room or bedroom. My home (in Maryland) is climate controlled - the thermostat set so that even when I'm not home, the indoor temperature will not sink much below 58 deg. in the winter, or rise much above 80 deg. in the summer. The place has decent insulation; keeping it from dipping much below 58 deg. in winter, or from going much above 80 deg. in summer consequently requires relatively little energy usage.

Similarly, in the winter, I run a humidifier. This keeps my home at a comfortable humidity. This benefits not just my guitars, but also my wood furniture, and people. That's right, people tend to do better when the air isn't bone dry - skin benefits, hair benefits, eyes often benefit, etc. For these reasons, I find room-based or home-based humidification to be preferable to just humidifying the guitar case. But to each his own.
--
Michael
#7
Quote by Msword7
What is an acceptable range of temperatures to keep acoustics in a room?

According to Breedlove my guitar was made and kept in ~ 70 degree temperature, my guitar room is in my basement and can hover around low to mid 60's, is my guitar in danger?


Is it possible that your basement is damp?

Get yourself a combo digital thermometer/hygrometer for a few dollars and keep it in your basement, then you will know if it gets too cold, too hot, too humid or too dry.
Quote by Cal UK

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#8
Hey, most of the world uses Celsius scale and wouldn't have much of a clue what 70degF is, isn't it about time USA gets with it. Just saying.
#9
Quote by R.Christie
Hey, most of the world uses Celsius scale and wouldn't have much of a clue what 70degF is, isn't it about time USA gets with it. Just saying.


That is about 22^C
Quote by Cal UK

...that's what Skeet always says anyway and he's a sex god.


Member of the official GB&C "Who to Listen to" list


I support Shay van Fani
I can supply WD Music, ABM and AllParts products to UK builders at DISCOUNTED prices!
#10
Quote by R.Christie
Hey, most of the world uses Celsius scale and wouldn't have much of a clue what 70degF is, isn't it about time USA gets with it. Just saying.


That's nice to know, but we are what we are, and there's nothing that anyone in UG is going to be able to do about it at any rate. Besides, the conversion for it is simple:

(degree C x 1.8) + 32 = degree F or (degree F - 32) / 1.8 = degree C
#11
Quote by patticake
basically if you're comfortable, so is your guitar.



This right here is THE best way to think of it, period. If it's hot and humid and you're suffering, then so is your guitar. If your chilled to the bone and can see your breath in your own house, then your guitar is going to be too cold too. Thinking of it this way alleviates some of the confusion many people have when it comes to temp and humidity for their instruments.