#1
Hey guys. Lately i've been working on improving my improv skills. I started off with blues based solos and i've gotten to the point where i can rip out blues riffs all day and string together a fairly decent solo. I feel like its time for me to move into rock soloing. I've been having difficulties. Everything i play comes out sounding like blues and I can't improvise a decent rock solo in my opinion. I'm using mostly the A and E minor Pentatonic scales. Do anyone have any suggestions on how I can give my solos more of a rock feel or recommended scales for rock soloing? thanks.
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#2
Pentatonic minor scale is one note short of a blues scale. Try using a full out diatonic scale (major or minor)
#3
add power chords
add some major and minor scales that arent penatonic i mean the 7 note ones
#4
It depends what sort of rock we're talking
classic rock shouldn't really have trouble blending in a good blues solo
nor should a lot of early heavy metal
Blues is the basis for a lot of music so it doesn't really matter
but i guess it comes out blues because Improvisation is a big part of the blues
while most rock musicians tend to write the solos they play rather than improvise them
but if you asked a rock musician to improvise a solo it would sound very bluesy becuase that's how rock musicians are taught to improvise
shouldn't worry about it too much, as long as it sounds good it's fine
#5
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rq6r23-le5o

Watch this God shows you how he started off with simple blues riffs, and how he's basically messed them all up together to create even more complicated riffs.

I reccomend learning as many solo's by the kinda guy you want to sound like as you can, you'll subconsciously steal their licks and stuff :P.
#6
blues and rock soloing methods are extremely similar, at least if you're playing rock like rolling stones, cream, the who, etc. if you're playing a different rock sub-genre, it could get different, for example prog rock replaces the blues influence with jazz or classical. you kinda just have to feel it in bues and rock, like you would use the same scales for either one, just play in a different way, to create a different atmosphere, its not anything that i could explain in terms of theory or technique, you just feel it.
#7
Quote by TMVATDI
blues and rock soloing methods are extremely similar, at least if you're playing rock like rolling stones, cream, the who, etc. if you're playing a different rock sub-genre, it could get different, for example prog rock replaces the blues influence with jazz or classical. you kinda just have to feel it in bues and rock, like you would use the same scales for either one, just play in a different way, to create a different atmosphere, its not anything that i could explain in terms of theory or technique, you just feel it.

+1

They both share a common ancestry...there's times when the only "difference" between a blues solo and a rock solo is the guitar tone.
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#8
Some pinch harmonics, tapping and arpeggios help. It's more a 'metal' solo thing if you overdo it, but if you really want to go for a 'rock' solo vs a 'blues' solo, that is one of the ways to give it a more rockier feel.

Also, using full diatonic scales rather than pentatonic certainly helps if that is the case.
#9
"Its not hard to play the blues but you need to FEEL them."

Blues is as much about soul and feeling as it is about solos, or theory or any of that bullshit.
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