#1
I play all of my major scales with the same shape.

Bear with me...
Ex: C Maj.
e--------------------------------
B--------------------------------
G-------------------2--4--5-----
D---------2--3--5---------------
A--3--5-------------------------
E--------------------------------

Now if I need to play a D Maj. in the same ocative I just move that pattern up a whole step. I know there are more "complex" shapes for each of the major scales. I was wondering if there was anything wrong with keeping this shape as long as I know the notes, and am not relying on the shape.

One more unrelated question I had...
The diagram of Circle of Fifths I use: http://www.music-theory-for-musicians.com/images/circle.png
Under each letter is the number of non-naturals in that scale. Under C is some odd clef (I suppose). I was wondering if anyone could tell me what that's called. I know it means C contains no non-naturals in it's scale, but I was just wondering what the name of this shape is.

Thanks,

Aaron
"The mind is everything. What you think, you become."
#2
I find it easier to use the full major shape, For example, Gmaj starting from low E;

[----------------------------------2-3-5--]e
[-----------------------------3-5----------]b
[---------------------2-4-5---------------]g
[--------------2-4-5---------------------]d
[------2-3-5-----------------------------]a
[-3-5--------------------------------------]e

And just move that shape accordingly, or use the Modified Nat. Minor Scale to play the Major notes. Whatever works for you really
How many guitar players does it take to change a light bulb?

Twelve. One to change the bulb and eleven to say they could do it better.

#3
nothing wrong with using that shape as long as you know the notes and can use them outsie of the shape

under the c is a natural sign just tells you its not sharp or flat
#4
I would say that as long as you know the notes, patterns will work, but eventually it would be most helpful to break that crutch completely. Knowing the fretboard notes and how each interval sounds/how you can play it would be the most helpful. Being able to use the patterns effectively in conjunction with your other knowledge as opposed to relying solely on patterns would be best in my opinion.

That's a natural sign. If you're in the key of D playing a piece, then one of the measures has the natural sign as an accidental. next to an F, it means to change it from F# to F for the measure. Sounded like you knew that, but I don't think it has a special name that is commonly used besides that.
Quote by DiminishedFifth
Who's going to stop you? The music police?
#5
Quote by NickGiovanni
I find it easier to use the full major shape, For example, Gmaj starting from low E;

[----------------------------------2-3-5--]e
[-----------------------------3-5----------]b
[---------------------2-4-5---------------]g
[--------------2-4-5---------------------]d
[------2-3-5-----------------------------]a
[-3-5--------------------------------------]e

And just move that shape accordingly, or use the Modified Nat. Minor Scale to play the Major notes. Whatever works for you really


That would be the same shape I use...
You just included the second octave.
"The mind is everything. What you think, you become."
#6
I suppose I will teach myself to play in the more complex shapes, and not just the one shape that I move up and down the fret board. I figured it was bad to play in the same shape but thought I would just check.

Thanks,
Aaron
"The mind is everything. What you think, you become."
#7
Why not learn the notes of the fretboard and the sharps/flats in each key? It does require a bit of effort but it means that you will never be stuck in shapes and you will know exactly what note you are playing, which is helpful in many situations, for example when you are soloing over a progression that is highly chromatic.