#1
A friend of mine suggesting using common electronic connectors in place of soldering to preserve the internal electronics when wiring. Is this a good idea? Would it negatively effect the sound or have any other negative effects that conventional soldering doesn't?

Thanks in advance!
#2
Soldering has worked for ages, and it's fun as hell to solder stuff.
I once soldered a parlyzed fly to the top a friends volume knob.
He was PISSED! ...so worth it though
How many guitar players does it take to change a light bulb?

Twelve. One to change the bulb and eleven to say they could do it better.

#3
You can easily desolder a connection with a solder sucker or solder wick. I'd solder, it's a lot stronger.

If you aren't confident with your skills, you can always get some cheapo parts at store (resistors and LED's and stuff) and practice soldering them together before you do it inside your guitar.
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#4
Quote by NickGiovanni
Soldering has worked for ages, and it's fun as hell to solder stuff.
I once soldered a parlyzed fly to the top a friends volume knob.
He was PISSED! ...so worth it though


well thats complete and utter bullshit seeing as you cant solder neither plastic nor flies
#5
Quote by Teej212
well thats complete and utter bullshit seeing as you cant solder neither plastic nor flies


the knob was metal, and the fly melted onto it. Excuse me for not delving into every individual detail. Take your trollfest to the "buy a schecter hellrasier" fourm with the rest of the trolls
How many guitar players does it take to change a light bulb?

Twelve. One to change the bulb and eleven to say they could do it better.

#6
Electrical connectors would work for the electronics. If you size the connectors right, you will not be able to hear any difference between soldering the wires to the potentiometer tabs. You will likely want to get potentiometers that have tabs meant for connectors though.

Soldering isn't that difficult, but if you really want to go with connectors they will work fine.
#7
It seems it would be a lot easier to just solder things together vs. installing connectors everywhere... most connectors are somewhat annoying to work with in the first place (crimp especially)
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#9
You somehow have to connect the wires to the connectors. That means either crimp or solder and solder is much more reliable, especially outside a factory environment with thousands of dollars of gear, skilled labor and an engineer to make sure the crimping is done properly.

Since a solder joint is needed anyway, I'd just solder it instead of adding the additional connector.
#10
Quote by Ronsonic
You somehow have to connect the wires to the connectors. That means either crimp or solder and solder is much more reliable, especially outside a factory environment with thousands of dollars of gear, skilled labor and an engineer to make sure the crimping is done properly.

Since a solder joint is needed anyway, I'd just solder it instead of adding the additional connector.


Crimping with a good connector is just as good as soldering if done right. Solder joints can have just as many problems as a crimp on connector. If you don't know how to solder, crimping will likely produce a better connection anyway
#11
Thanks for all the help. Seems like soldering might just be the best option after all.

Also, in retrospect, wouldn't there be some required soldering anyway to bridge, bottom of pots, etc. Unless there's some way around that I don't know about.