#1
Hello there!

I'm looking for some mods for my cheap fender squier guitar. I've already done a few simple things such as swapping the the neck and middle pickups to get a different tone, but im looking for something that will give me a "meaner" tone.

So if any one has any tutorials for rewiring and what not with a video or pictures, please leave a comment. I'm fairly decent with soldering so I'm not a complete newbie.
#2
If you're gonna invest in modding a guitar, you should probably invest in a higher end strat first, but you may want to look for a cheap pedal to try to get you the tone you want before you spend more money on mods.
#3
"Meaner."

As in?

If you want a little less quack n spank attributed to Strat type guitars, you could get a real beefy trem block with a lot more mass than the (most likely) zinc pos in the Squier.
#5
cut and modify your pickguard and throw in 2 humbuckers, one for the bridge, one in the mid, and leave the single at the neck.

will greatly enhance your sound I'm sure even if you only put a humbucker in the bridge position, and i think theres pickguards you can buy already set up for a humbucker.

i don't think you'd even have to cut into the body at all i think the squier strat just has a huge square routed into it with the pickguard holding them all in place.


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#6
Quote by cedricsmods
A switch that allows you to put the pickups in series instead of parallel may be what you are looking for.


That sounds what I'm looking for, do you know any tutorials?

As for the above, I already have a new guitar in mind but will buy at a much later date. Just trying to customize the cheapo one i have. I already own some pedals.
#8
Quote by cedricsmods
Do you currently have 3 single coil pickups?

This wiring method requires several switches, but it's baller: http://www.1728.com/guitar2.htm


Yes I do and thats an interesting mod.

I had another question:

I've been reading articles about people putting two single coils next to each other for a "not so real" humbucker. Could I simply cut a hole in my scratch plate and move the single coil there? Or is there other wiring required? I already have the cavities in my guitar body.
#9
That sounds a lot like running a humbucker in parallel. That is when you run the coils independently. It could be done with 2 single coils, and is. On a normal strat, positions 2 and 4 have two coils running at once, like a parallel humbucker. It will make a difference as to where they are, the closer they are, their tones will be more alike.


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#10
I humbucker is indeed very similar to a pair of single coils. That site I linked you to has good explanations and diagrams showing different ways to connect coils.

Other wiring is required.
A standard humbucker has two coils (wound reverse from each other) and wired in series. In a strat, positions 2 and 4 are two coils (wound reverse to cancel hum) but they are wired in parallel.

So if you want to get a humbucker-ish sound out of two single coils, you should move them next to each other and wire them in series. If you do this, you can wind up with essentially a 4-conductor humbucker (though it will sound a bit different). With the right switching, it could be split, phase changed, or toggle between in series or in parallel with itself.
#11
Quote by MonkeyLink07
That sounds a lot like running a humbucker in parallel. That is when you run the coils independently. It could be done with 2 single coils, and is. On a normal strat, positions 2 and 4 have two coils running at once, like a parallel humbucker. It will make a difference as to where they are, the closer they are, their tones will be more alike.


Yes my strat already has the 2 and 4 positions running two coils at once, I was just curious if it would change the sound noticeably if I put them right next to each other.

Quote by cedricsmods
I humbucker is indeed very similar to a pair of single coils. That site I linked you to has good explanations and diagrams showing different ways to connect coils.

Other wiring is required.
A standard humbucker has two coils (wound reverse from each other) and wired in series. In a strat, positions 2 and 4 are two coils (wound reverse to cancel hum) but they are wired in parallel.

So if you want to get a humbucker-ish sound out of two single coils, you should move them next to each other and wire them in series. If you do this, you can wind up with essentially a 4-conductor humbucker (though it will sound a bit different). With the right switching, it could be split, phase changed, or toggle between in series or in parallel with itself.


What I had in mind, was to have on position on my five way switch set to run the two in series because I didn't want to add any new hardware at the moment. I was thinking all i had to do was resolder some wires into different places.
Last edited by SHiLLySiT at Aug 22, 2010,
#14
+1, 'specially if it's buzzing. Plus, it looks cooler.


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#16
they do have small, single coil sized humbuckers. They're called stacked humbuckers, you may want to look into one of those.


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#17
Quote by MonkeyLink07
they do have small, single coil sized humbuckers. They're called stacked humbuckers, you may want to look into one of those.


Oh that sounds interesting. Is there any difference in sound between the stacked humbucker and the regular?
#18
It obviously won't sound exactly alike, but they probably sound close. I haven't had experience with the stacked humbuckers. I'm just guessing that they will be a bit more trebley, and not have as great a crunch, but I'm sure they're pretty similar.


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#19
Quote by MonkeyLink07
It obviously won't sound exactly alike, but they probably sound close. I haven't had experience with the stacked humbuckers. I'm just guessing that they will be a bit more trebley, and not have as great a crunch, but I'm sure they're pretty similar.


I see, I'll look into those.

Quick question on following the shielding tutorial: http://www.guitarnuts.com/wiring/shielding/shield3.php

Do I need to do the last part, meaning, adding a capacitor? I don't have a capacitor on hand, but I can do all the tin foil parts.
#20
Quote by GuitarNuts
You can omit the capacitor entirely (replacing it with a piece of wire) if you're confident you'll never plug into a malfunctioning vintage amp and if you check the house wiring religiously everywhere you play.


It's just a precaution.


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#21
The capacitor is to protect you from shock. It is not necessary for the shielding.
You can wire your single coils in series, but you will need more switches, and depending on how you do it, you might sacrifice the standard strat combinations.