#1
What are the most common rock/metal keys besides C major/A minor. (please don't double list by saying harmonic minor or some other alternate scale just name the keys.)
#3
E minor since that includes open E.
The key itself won't be of much help though. It's how you use the notes themselves.

Edit: also what Primus said
Quote by DiminishedFifth
Who's going to stop you? The music police?
#4
Often an open string, usually like primusfan said but that mostly applies to metal.
Otherwise, there is no real common key.
#6
diminished scale, harmonic minor scale. Diminished scale is alternating half step/whole step and it's kinda unsettling because it doesn't really resolve and harmonic minor scale has a flat sixth in comparison to the melodic minor scale (ascending version that is) if I remember correctly, it gives you that egyptian type of sound, if you ever heard of the death metal band Nile, that's their bread and butter. I know you said keys but you can move to any key and play most things, different scales will offer you more diversity. Eb minor, E minor, D minor are common keys as well as using dropped D tuning (Tool uses this tuning in almost every song I've ever played of theirs) Slightly rarer is open G tuning -sounds really nice tho...
Edit: Youtube these two scales for guitar and I'm sure you'll find a bunch of lessons on both and you'll most likely find a lot of metal oriented guitarist and/or jazz oriented guitarist talking about it. Enjoy, I love using both even though I think they get horrifically abused these days especially in deathcore type of stuff.
Edit 2: another thing I just remembered thats more of a prog metal type of style is playing a riff then transposing it to another scale, Rush does this a lot about 1 minute into their song YYZ the bass and the guitar do it (if I remember right, they might just be playing octaves but it doesn't sound like it to me...)
Last edited by LightxGrenade at Aug 22, 2010,
#7
Quote by LightxGrenade
diminished scale, harmonic minor scale. Diminished scale is alternating half step/whole step and it's kinda unsettling because it doesn't really resolve and harmonic minor scale has a flat sixth in comparison to the melodic minor scale (ascending version that is) if I remember correctly, it gives you that egyptian type of sound, if you ever heard of the death metal band Nile, that's their bread and butter. I know you said keys but you can move to any key and play most things, different scales will offer you more diversity. Eb minor, E minor, D minor are common keys as well as using dropped D tuning (Tool uses this tuning in almost every song I've ever played of theirs) Slightly rarer is open G tuning -sounds really nice tho...
Edit: Youtube these two scales for guitar and I'm sure you'll find a bunch of lessons on both and you'll most likely find a lot of metal oriented guitarist and/or jazz oriented guitarist talking about it. Enjoy, I love using both even though I think they get horrifically abused these days especially in deathcore type of stuff.
Edit 2: another thing I just remembered thats more of a prog metal type of style is playing a riff then transposing it to another scale, Rush does this a lot about 1 minute into their song YYZ the bass and the guitar do it (if I remember right, they might just be playing octaves but it doesn't sound like it to me...)



thats all well and good, but you just made molehills into mountains there

Some of those scales need to be studied for yonks before anyone can understand them - but yeah, metal relies on FLAYYVA (a retarded way of saying flavour) - i've found a lot of contemporary metal and progressive music is a hybrid of jazz, classical and rock, so its a massive range on choice for thee to pick a key / overal tonality from
Quote by BlitzkriegAir
1. Get drunk
2. play pentatonic scales fast
3. throw in some divebombs and pinch harmonics
4. Get killed onstage
5. become legendary guitarist instantaneously


Quote by Holy Katana

How dare you attack the greatness of the augmented sixth?
#8
Quote by Tominator_1991
thats all well and good, but you just made molehills into mountains there

Some of those scales need to be studied for yonks before anyone can understand them - but yeah, metal relies on FLAYYVA (a retarded way of saying flavour) - i've found a lot of contemporary metal and progressive music is a hybrid of jazz, classical and rock, so its a massive range on choice for thee to pick a key / overal tonality from
Awesome thanks for the passive-agressive comment
You leave a vague response saying he needs flavor and I tried to give him a specific response so he can identify what he's listening to when he hears it and work on some metal techniques?
And besides if he's not going to learn them now, then WHEN is he going to? That's like saying I'm not going to learn how to improvise on guitar because it realistically takes years to get good at it.
#9
The question here is about keys.

There aren't really any "common keys" in any genre of music. They're all over the place. One could argue that more often than not you will come across the keys of E, A, D and G (both major and minor) because they're easier to access/visualise/manipulate/whatever on the fretboard of a standard guitar, but it's of no use really.

You can manipulate all scales to fit all keys, you don't learn the keys one-by-one. So once you've mastered one, and learnt how to apply it to other keys, you've mastered them all.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
Soundcloud
#10
Quote by LightxGrenade
Awesome thanks for the passive-agressive comment
You leave a vague response saying he needs flavor and I tried to give him a specific response so he can identify what he's listening to when he hears it and work on some metal techniques?
And besides if he's not going to learn them now, then WHEN is he going to? That's like saying I'm not going to learn how to improvise on guitar because it realistically takes years to get good at it.



Its always better to start small,

Writing a chord progression in Eminor, accentuating the b3, b6 and b7 would be a much better start than delving headlong into diminished scales, and melodic minor theory.

I'm not meaning to shatter you, its just confusing for someone when you throw all your knowledge on them rather than just give a quick concise answer
Quote by BlitzkriegAir
1. Get drunk
2. play pentatonic scales fast
3. throw in some divebombs and pinch harmonics
4. Get killed onstage
5. become legendary guitarist instantaneously


Quote by Holy Katana

How dare you attack the greatness of the augmented sixth?
#11
Quote by Tominator_1991
Its always better to start small,

Writing a chord progression in Eminor, accentuating the b3, b6 and b7 would be a much better start than delving headlong into diminished scales, and melodic minor theory.
I'm not meaning to shatter you, its just confusing for someone when you throw all your knowledge on them rather than just give a quick concise answer

You could be right but it's all subjective. I learned how to play scales before I ever thought of any chord cadences, or at least before I had any appreciation of what was actually going on in them. Everyone learns differently, that's why I told him to youtube videos on these scales, so he gets a visual and audio example of these scales at work. Like the guy who posted above you said, you learn one key and it's simply a matter of transposing, keys sometimes are chosen more so on their ease to play on a fretboard more than anything else. Not to down play any other genre but metal isn't the easiest genre to play. IMO learning scales is the best way to understand what you're hearing and be able to apply it in your improvisation. Simply telling him what keys are most common in metal would answer his question but wouldn't (at least in my opinion) giving him any practical info.
#12
Quote by LightxGrenade
You could be right but it's all subjective. I learned how to play scales before I ever thought of any chord cadences, or at least before I had any appreciation of what was actually going on in them. Everyone learns differently, that's why I told him to youtube videos on these scales, so he gets a visual and audio example of these scales at work. Like the guy who posted above you said, you learn one key and it's simply a matter of transposing, keys sometimes are chosen more so on their ease to play on a fretboard more than anything else. Not to down play any other genre but metal isn't the easiest genre to play. IMO learning scales is the best way to understand what you're hearing and be able to apply it in your improvisation. Simply telling him what keys are most common in metal would answer his question but wouldn't (at least in my opinion) giving him any practical info.



But what good is a scale on its own? Surely is TS wanted to hear practically used metal scale in practice, they would listen to metal. At the end of the day its just about to listening to the music you want to study and not trying to narrow it down to specifics.

In terms of keys, this thread should already be closed
Quote by BlitzkriegAir
1. Get drunk
2. play pentatonic scales fast
3. throw in some divebombs and pinch harmonics
4. Get killed onstage
5. become legendary guitarist instantaneously


Quote by Holy Katana

How dare you attack the greatness of the augmented sixth?
#13
Quote by Tominator_1991
But what good is a scale on its own? Surely is TS wanted to hear practically used metal scale in practice, they would listen to metal. At the end of the day its just about to listening to the music you want to study and not trying to narrow it down to specifics.

In terms of keys, this thread should already be closed

Is this turning into one of those "using theory will make you lose soul and feeling in your playing" conversation? Like I said ITS SUBJECTIVE, your opinion is your own and mine is my own. Just because something worked for you doesn't mean it'll always work. Not everyone is so musically inclined that they can listen to something and just pick it up right off the bat. And besides who the hell said that he should only play scales? I gave him some tips that he could choose to take or not take, you gave him your theory on what he should do, to be honest you kind of just keep arguing the "i'm right and you're wrong" theory, but whatever I'm done with this.