#1
What does the term "box" mean when it comes to describing scales? I.e. pentatonic box.
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#2
What they basically mean is that the scale shape does not extend up/down the neck but in a range of 5-6 frets. Simply put the shape is more boxed as opposed to a scale that would go down the neck
#3
---------------------------------------5--8--
--------------------------------5--8---------
------------------------5--7-----------------
----------------5--7-------------------------
---------5--7--------------------------------
--5--8--------------------------------------- A Pentatonic Minor 5th fret box

Just to add to what Elidor said
#4
something you shouldn't learn and is adequatly named because it will box you in. learn you scales on one string, then position playing will come quickly and easily. learn how to build scales as well, do not learn to rely on physical patterns.
#5
Quote by tehREALcaptain
something you shouldn't learn and is adequatly named because it will box you in. learn you scales on one string, then position playing will come quickly and easily. learn how to build scales as well, do not learn to rely on physical patterns.


If you actually take the time to learn how to string the different 'boxes' together on the neck, I think its a lot easier to learn how to play a scale if you get it down to smaller parts or chunks rather than trying to learn it fully immediately.
#6
Quote by MagicsDevil
---------------------------------------5--8--
--------------------------------5--8---------
------------------------5--7-----------------
----------------5--7-------------------------
---------5--7--------------------------------
--5--8--------------------------------------- A Pentatonic Minor 5th fret box

Just to add to what Elidor said



i get this.. but u play it in the 3rd fret its g pentatonic scale(tat was how i was thought) nw it is being played on the 5th fret which is A. tat means its an A pentatonic scale.! how do u cal its MINOR?

I kno the q is really silly.. stil try to explain
#7
Quote by guitar.pick
i get this.. but u play it in the 3rd fret its g pentatonic scale(tat was how i was thought) nw it is being played on the 5th fret which is A. tat means its an A pentatonic scale.! how do u cal its MINOR?

I kno the q is really silly.. stil try to explain


Well, if you play what I posted transposed down two half steps, it's not G pentatonic of any kind (neutral, major, minor or blues) so i'm not sure if thats what you mean, but the reason it is A pentatonic minor is because pentatonic minor is formed 1, b3, 4, 5, b7 which is the root, A, then the flattened third, which is the third (C#) flattened to C, then the fourth, D, and then the fifth, E, and lastly the flattened seventh, which is the seventh (G#) flattened to G, which makes

A, C, D, E, G

Which is what I posted.
#8
If you actually take the time to learn how to string the different 'boxes' together on the neck, I think its a lot easier to learn how to play a scale if you get it down to smaller parts or chunks rather than trying to learn it fully immediately.


agreed, which is why i suggested the OP stay away from boxes. its incredibly easy to play a major scale in any key on a single string slowly, and doing it will result in a better knowledge of the fretboard, after which scales will be played naturally, and learning boxes will not be neccesary.