#1
So the music industry is at a really uncomfortable point right now and it is very hard to make it big. Bands probably have to work harder than ever trying to promote,manage and tour to support themselves. Some bands choose not to try to get signed and do everything themselves.

There are pros and cons of doing one or the other. You can learn about D.I.Y and the realities of major labels at The Indie Band Survival Guide

also check out Steve Albini's The Problem With Music

Now that you learned about the industry, what would you do with your band/group/self. Is their a fine line for you for what the record company gets and your share? Would you be okay with signing off the rights to your music? These are some of the tough questions bands have to answer and I was just wondering everyone's opinion on it.
#3
it costs 80 dollars to self-release your own album on iTunes and other stores world-wide, and you make 70 cents on the dollar, vs about 2 to 25 cents on a major label deal. plus, you owe the label any money they spent on your album and it's promotion. the only benefit is that the label can get your music out there to the right audience, and they will come to your gigs, thereby making you enough money to pay back the label.

the obvious solution is to figure out how to promote yourself, and forget the major labels. major labels are outdated, and their only answer to the digital music age is to mass-produce bad pop music from flash-in-the-pan artists, and to sue anyone they can for not buying their products. nowhere in there are they developing artists, being mindful of the art, or even giving bands a fighting chance.
#4
I bought the Indie Band Survival Guide last year, and it is a really insightful book. Its helped a lot with ideas for promotion and gigging. I think the most important thing you can do as an independent band is network. You'd be surprised what you can find through people you know.
#5
On an unrelated note : Steve Alibini is just a pretentious ass. He's talked shit about both Nirvana and Pixies' landmark album Surfer Rose with a snooty anti-anything attitude. I would take what he says with a grain of salt.
#6
It really depends on what kind of what kind of music you're playing.

If you're some dime-a-dozen modern rock or indie act, it would be a big mistake to sign with a major label without negotiating.

If anyone would actually buy your records, you'd be missing out on that if you went independent.

edit: The key is negotiating. You can't act like you're afraid of your label dropping you if you plan to make any real money from them.

Quote by element4433
With the millions of bands jumping to get signed by a major label, they'd dump you in a second.

Not always true. Depends on how much money they think your band will bring in. Depends on the label too. If you tried that with, say, RCA... Yeah, they'd probably just say, "Well, see ya later!"
Last edited by -[NiL]- at Aug 22, 2010,
#7
Quote by TomusAM
Negotiate with record label so they don't turn you into what you don't want to be.
With the millions of bands jumping to get signed by a major label, they'd dump you in a second.
*-)
Quote by Bob_Sacamano
i kinda wish we all had a penis and vagina instead of buttholes

i mean no offense to buttholes and poop or anything

Rest in Peace, Troy Davis and Trayvon Martin and Jordan Davis and Eric Garner and Mike Brown
#8
Quote by frigginjerk
it costs 80 dollars to self-release your own album on iTunes and other stores world-wide, and you make 70 cents on the dollar, vs about 2 to 25 cents on a major label deal. plus, you owe the label any money they spent on your album and it's promotion. the only benefit is that the label can get your music out there to the right audience, and they will come to your gigs, thereby making you enough money to pay back the label.

the obvious solution is to figure out how to promote yourself, and forget the major labels. major labels are outdated, and their only answer to the digital music age is to mass-produce bad pop music from flash-in-the-pan artists, and to sue anyone they can for not buying their products. nowhere in there are they developing artists, being mindful of the art, or even giving bands a fighting chance.

In 1991 both Metallica and Nirvana came out with their landmark albums, exposing the mainstream audience to sound that wasn't heard by them before. Also that year, there was Michael Jackson's Dangerous , and Color Me Badd sold millions of records, and so did New Kids on The Block.

It's a little bit harder to do that now, man. You have to understand that. All those artists I listed went multi-platinum. There was something for everybody. But because a lot of people who like Justin Beiber aren't buying his records and would rather steal ( understandably, because they can and why pay for something you can get for free rite?? ), they can't use Beiber money to take chances on the Nirvanas of the world. There were always flash in the pan artists, by the way. One hit wonders. Music business isn't special. If any business' product was suddenly, easily available for free this would happen.

To answer the TS, work like there are no labels. Do what you can to become successful like there were no labels. This even makes you look better if a label comes around. Bands like Fugazi have been doing DIY things for years and they're huge as an indie band. Supposedly they were offered contracts from tons of record companies that they turned down, one that was like a million bucks (which they turned down because of DIY ethics). But you also have to accept that the label dream of diamond rings and limousines is probably dead. But *as long as you love what you do* this shouldn't matter.
#9
Quote by Toniofalcon
On an unrelated note : Steve Alibini is just a pretentious ass. He's talked shit about both Nirvana and Pixies' landmark album Surfer Rose with a snooty anti-anything attitude. I would take what he says with a grain of salt.
Pretentious ass? Yes.

Knows what he's talking about? Yes.

He might be a pretentious ass, but he definitely is very knowledgeable when it comes to music and the music industry.
*-)
Quote by Bob_Sacamano
i kinda wish we all had a penis and vagina instead of buttholes

i mean no offense to buttholes and poop or anything

Rest in Peace, Troy Davis and Trayvon Martin and Jordan Davis and Eric Garner and Mike Brown
#10
I thought this thread was about a band called 'DIY V' who had just signed with a major label.

Fail on my part right there.
.

Disclaimer: By reading the above post, you agree that El Hilliaro is legally and morally free from any responsiblity should any harm be incurred by said post.


Also, you agree that I'm awesome and own all your stuff now.
#12
Pros of DIY: Control, you actually get paid.

Cons of DIY: You have to fund yourself, management can be a pain.


Pros of Label: Funded out of your arse if you're a good band, management and tour is arranged for you.

Cons of label: Lose a lot of control (depending on your deal), some bands don't even get paid.
#13
I think DIY is the way to go, Rod Chappers makes some good points about it in the endorsement video that usually gets thrown out whenever this topic comes up. It's not too hard to record your own stuff, especially if your music is fairly low production, which is probably part of the reason why acoustic artists do so well, really not difficult to make some recordings of you and a guitar part and then stick it up on CD baby (or something like that) and start making a bit of money.

The internet seems to be a new artists greatest resource, because you can promote and sell through it far easier (and cheaper) than you could in any other way other than signing for a label.
#14
Wait? Its harder than ever to make it in the music business?

The internet is for a lot more than porn, bro.
#15
If you're good at self promotion, then DIY is the way to go. Facebook, MySpace, YouTube and internet forums are great ways of self promotion. There are sites out there that you can pay to put your stuff on iTunes and such, where you give them like $30 and then you get all the proceeds from the music. It's really easy to home record what with equipment like the Axe FX and such. I'd say the only tough thing to do by yourself would be CD and merchandise production.
Last edited by Pat_s1t at Aug 23, 2010,