#1
Okay, so I've recently learnt the five positions of the scale, I figured it'd help with my improvising, but shit still sounds the same a lot of the time, and not very exciting in some areas. Any tips or ideas for licks that might sound pretty cool?

Btw, if it helps, it's mostly slow, clean stuff that I play.

THANKS.

=)
#2
It sounds the same 'cause you're playing the same stuff.

Duh.

Learn some of your favorite songs that have pentatonics in them
#3
Do you have any practice tracks? Also, try listening to solos done by other artists. I don't want you to copy their style, but it can be helpful to play the same thing they're playing.

Here's another exercise I teach. Play a practice track and just listen to it. Don't play anything on your guitar. In your mind, I want you to hear yourself playing. This is YOUR creativity. What we need to do, is get to the point where you can play guitar and still hear this soloing in your head, so that you can emulate it on the guitar.

This is actually quite hard to do. When you pick up the guitar and start playing, the creativity is easily lost, because you're focussing so hard on playing and you ignore that little "voice." So, initially, hear something being played in your head, then pick up the guitar and translate that to it. Eventually, you'll get to the point where you really don't have to think a whole lot about your fingers playing and you can concentrate on your fingers playing what you hear in your head.

Also, don't be afraid to leave a little room in your lead/solo playing. You don't have to play all the time. This is another hard one to do.

Don't have any practice tracks? Do a Google search on Free Practice Tracks. There are a number of sites available.

Good luck!!!
#4
What KG6_Steven is describing is exactly what I would recommend, too.

We all have an 'inner jukebox', that part in our head that gives us musical ideas. The aim of improvisation is to tap into this jukebox and play what you hear. Admittedly, this takes a lot of practice. The hard part is being able to play what you hear, instantly and accurately. The pentatonic scale can help you with this as it restricts the number of notes to choose from to 5, rather than 13. If you want to know more, it might help to read http://www.theloneguitaristblog.com/mastery/the-essence-of-improvisation-your-inner-jukebox/

Hope this helps,
Willem
Last edited by willemhdb at Aug 22, 2010,
#5
Learn arpeggios!

It will break you out of that same sound, I know as they also saved me.

Learn different arps and how to link them, and soon you will basically master the fretboard.

Note: It helps a hell of a lot to learn the theory of arps as they are dead basic, the ones youll be orking with will simply be major and minor which are only built up of three notes.

They are boring i know but seriously mate they get you around that fretboard and sounding emotional.

Im amazed and Ive been doing them for 2 days Seems I wasted the past 4 years
#6
I agree with listening to a lot of pentatonic solos...I suggest as a beginner to soloing some classic Stevie ray vaughan or something along that line...you may feel after awhile that its simple but its his phrasing and vibrato that sets him apart.
work on developing your vibrato and work on your bending...ass these things with hammer ons and pull offs and with the knowledge you already have you should be able to create some tasty leads....if you can get arpeggios down this early on then that's a plus...it took me awhile to make sense of them,some people catch on to things in different time periods than others
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#7
Quote by willemhdb
We all have an 'inner jukebox', that part in our head that gives us musical ideas. The aim of improvisation is to tap into this jukebox and play what you hear. Admittedly, this takes a lot of practice. The hard part is being able to play what you hear, instantly and accurately. The pentatonic scale can help you with this as it restricts the number of notes to choose from to 5, rather than 13. If you want to know more, it might help to read http://www.theloneguitaristblog.com/mastery/the-essence-of-improvisation-your-inner-jukebox/

Hope this helps,
Willem


Bingo! Read your article and it's dead on with what I teach. Nice job. Never thought of calling it the inner jukebox, but that's exactly what it is.
#9
Focus on adding some extra notes into the Amin Pentatonic. The post above has some great uses of the "blue" note e flat!