#1
I have recently developed quite a liking for Peter, Paul and Mary and other Folk music; thanks to a documentary I saw on the trio.
I've been wishing to be able to replicate their music as closely as I can (after of course I find another guitarist and a female singer) but I have encountered a problem. I have a terrible ear and have little guitar experience under my belt so I am not like some people who can just go "Oh they are playing this chord and using these techniques". However, I do have the internet at my disposal and now to my real question.
Does anyone know the type of fingerpicking patterns that Peter and Noel (Paul) use? After looking at videos it seems to be a kind of Travis picking (for Peter) and with a little search with Google, some people (read some random internet post) say it is an alternate thumb (bass?) picking style.
I've been trying to go through a small section of videos of them performing and trying to figure out what kind of patterns Peter is using. I of course assume that they probably play it slightly different each time and that they are probably using a different pattern for different songs.

If it matters, I am more looking at how they played in the 60's and not recently.
Hmm, I also have a feeling that it doesn't matter too much and the only reason why it sounds so different when I play is because of my inexperience with fingerpicking and crappy "rhythm" skills.

Edit:
Whoops, I was meaning to post this in the guitar techniques section. Could a mod move it there?
Last edited by DrOhlawdy at Aug 22, 2010,
#2
Well, I was around when PPM were hot stuff and thousands of would-be folkies were trying to emulate them.
As I recall, Yarrow was considered to be a pretty advanced player back then. Still, one can get through nearly all the PPM catalogue with variations of what we were calling "Travis Picking" back then.
That's essentially pattern picking, usually with an alternating bass line.

A quick look on the net did not disclose any actual method books or tabs, just song arrangements with chords. Likely YouTube has some classic recordings you could steal licks from.