#1
I need some good exercises to use with a metrenome to get me into fast playing, help?
#2
Just find some licks you want to learn from solo's. Slow them down to the point where you can actually play them, and then when you can play them perfectly, speed it up.
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#4
Megadeth's Go to Hell has several fast licks in them involving Harmonics and hammer ons and fast picking.
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#5
One thing I realized watching speed boot camp DVD: if you think about it, alternate picking is the very worst for speed. Think about it, every u change string it's countereffective to change direction. So teach yourself hybrid sweep picking. Trust me in five years or so you'll alternate pick anyways. The trick is to take a solo you know, and maximize every string change to sweep. If u change from a string to the one above it, endeavor to play two upstrokes. It's better to teach yrself how to rest the pick on the next string than overpractice altpiking. If you do learn Randy Rhoads tab, make sure you focus on the right hand- his choice hamr/pulloffs vs. picked notes is very helpful to capture. Don't do what I did and just memorize the lefthand fretted notes o
#6
Quote by Khriss Bliss
One thing I realized watching speed boot camp DVD: if you think about it, alternate picking is the very worst for speed. Think about it, every u change string it's countereffective to change direction.
Sometimes, but not in all cases. The advantage of alternate picking is that you don't have to think about it - which allows you the freedom to pick any combination of notes on-the-fly even at hight speeds.
Quote by Khriss Bliss
So teach yourself hybrid sweep picking. Trust me in five years or so you'll alternate pick anyways.
No. In five years you'll continue picking exactly the way you've taught yourself to pick up until then, unless you train yourself otherwise.

If not, when you eventually realize that strict alternate picking would be a good skill to have (which could take years)... you'll be sorry. Because you'll have to go back and un-learn tendencies to the opposite that you've built into your brain over time. That can be extremely difficult and frustrating, especially if you already become a fairly advanced player.
Quote by Khriss Bliss
The trick is to take a solo you know, and maximize every string change to sweep.
What about solos that you don't know?... (improvising for example). To really create your own music on the spot, there's no time to plan out your picking attack 100%. That is exactly where problems begin to arise and it only gets worse.

Khriss bliss I know where your coming from. Path of least resistance to every note can be much faster than alt picking a lot of times. But I wrongfully assumed in my younger years that alternate picking was uneccessary and I should just skip straight to whatever was most economical. It made sense at the time. And it is still my single biggest regret.
#7
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http://www.veoh.com/browse/videos/category/music/watch/v290586sz4RRQC4

download the veoh webplayer thing(its free) to watch the whole thing.

this thing is the bible of shred guitar


i downloaded the player but it refuses to load the video.

EDIT: it's alright i figured it out. Great find
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Last edited by blankoff at Aug 23, 2010,
#8
What you could even do is sit down and play your major scales or minor scales through the circle of fourths, and every week or when you feel comfortable enough bump it up 5 clicks or however your metronome operates.
#9
A video I always reccommend for players wanting to learn Shred is: Intense Rock by Paul Gilbert. It's hands down one of the best Shred instructionals out. Check it out, it will help you loads.
#10
I second the Intense Rock. PG knows how to play. Its constant licks, so you wont get bored if you're a spaz (like myself).
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#11
It's not really the exercise, it's how you practice it...

One thing that'll make your chromatic 4-note-per-string exercises way more effective is if you leave your finger on the note it last fretted until it is time for it to fret a new one or it has to move so another note can be played.

Another thing I do is mute the note after it's played. Practicing like this is best when you are doing it plugged in with lots of gain - helps your muting big time. Don't forget to practice clean too though; each way hides different flaws in your playing.

And as far as the chromatic exercises go... I think it's best to concentrate on the more difficult ones at a slow tempo with the methods I described above. It's definitely not necessary to spend hours and hours on non-musical exercises every day... typically I devote about 10% of practice to the non-musical exercises and use them as a warm up, then I'll move on to more musical things.

My speed and control have risen very noticeable over the last month or so from practicing like this - I am very pleased.
#12
One of my most effective guitar warmups/exercises that I still use today is the G major scale in thirds:



Yet another one that I see many lead guitar players using is the block headed four finger exercise:




Like the others have said, use a metronome and alternate picking!

Good Luck!
#13
I'm kinda at the same point right now where I can play rather fast but its mostly just minor scale stuff nothing really shreddy....my shred lick vocabulary is rather weak...I have been playing the stuff off yngwies play loud dvd and I got most of the stuff down but I can't seem to play it fast enough I'm stuck at like 180bpm on everything and at that pace it sounds crappy...he must be going over 300 lol
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#14
Playing scales in thirds is definitely a great exercise that will help you with your chord construction (since a lot of chords are built in thirds), finger economy, and picking, but there is a place for the four finger exercise as well.

My favorite variation of that 4 finger exercise is 1-3-2-4 and 1-4-2-3.