#1
So, ideally we want our wrist to be as straight as possible. However, we also want our thumb in the the middle of the neck on the back of the guitar. Trying to get my thumb there requires a ridiculous wrist bend. What am I doing (or interpreting) wrong? I sit in an armless chair with the guitar on my right leg, in a generally relaxed position. Also, I am very tall, 6' 3". I don't think that has anything to do with it though.
Just picked up playing guitar again, using justinguitars beginner course for now...

Mainly a drummer rocking Tama w/ Sabian + Zildjian Cymbals
#2
Obviously doing something wrong. When I play, my wrist it fairly straight. My thumb is quite often in the middle of the neck, but sometimes I allow it to go above the neck, when playing open chords.

Armless chair is not a factor, neither is your height. If you need a picture, I'll snap one of my hand position and post it.
#3
I found that when I put my thumb about 3/4th the way up the neck, my wrist only bends about 15 degrees, rather than the 45 degree bend caused from being in the middle of the neck. A pic from the back showing the thumb would be very helpful good sir!
Just picked up playing guitar again, using justinguitars beginner course for now...

Mainly a drummer rocking Tama w/ Sabian + Zildjian Cymbals
#7
Yikes not at all. To me it looks like your thumb is parallel to the fretboard? Is that how its supposed to be? And the second picture has your palm touching the neck (or at least it looks like it) and I thought you were supposed to have as little contact as possible between your hand and the neck
Just picked up playing guitar again, using justinguitars beginner course for now...

Mainly a drummer rocking Tama w/ Sabian + Zildjian Cymbals
#8
Yeah, the first pic is just a barre chord. The second is an open chord. That's normally how I play chords, although I was taught to ALWAYS keep the thumb behind the neck. You're right - the thumb, in the first photo, is almost parallel to the neck.

On the second photo, my palm is quite close to the neck, but not quite touching. If it were to touch, it'd mute the high E in a hurry.

Bottom line here is, make it as comfortable for yourself as possible.

Any chance you can post a pic of your hand position on the guitar neck?
#9
To properly play classical you wd have yr gtr on the left leg, pref raised on a $50 foot thingie, thumb pointing a the headstock, but frankly, it seems violating these proprieties is what gives style to yr sound. Jimmy Page does so much counterintuitive positioning in both hands. But it is good to learn the most economic way as an option. When you do finger exercises, keep fingers within half inch of fretboard- which is brutally hard I know. Don't pick with arm, use wrist and/or knuckle for action. Etc.
#10
I'll try to get my hands on a camera tomorrow, have to wake up at 5 AM tomorrow heh. Thanks for the help so far, I know (well I don't really know, but I think) that the thumb comes up naturally on a lot of chords so I shouldn't really worry about that. Also, should I wear a strap while I play sitting down?
Just picked up playing guitar again, using justinguitars beginner course for now...

Mainly a drummer rocking Tama w/ Sabian + Zildjian Cymbals
#11
The thumb will come up naturally on a lot of chords - and it will do it naturally. About the only time I keep my thumb behind the neck is for barre chords, for the extra strength.

Wearing a strap during practice when sitting is personal preference. I don't. One thing to keep in mind that playing while sitting and playing while standing are two different animals. They feel different and are different. Try to practice doing both.

Hope this helps.
#12
Experiment with posture and do it whichever way makes your playing better/sound good.

Personally I have my thumb lower than the half way mark (almost touching the side of the fretboard actually) which helps me reach the thicker strings comfortably. It's harder to bend like this though, so I adapted the technique of putting neck-heavy pressure on the guitar with my picking hand while fretting hand bends the note up. My fingers usually point directly up, or towards the headstock. This makes the finger lengths more 'level' since pinky is smaller than the rest of them.

As long as it doesn't hurt you or hinder technique you should be OK.
Last edited by ldragon-slayerl at Aug 25, 2010,