#1
Love playing/listening to classical guitar? Discuss all here!

Are there many keen classical guitarists on UG? If so how long have you been playing etc? Or what pieces are you working on, or hope to one day play?

This is a piece I discovered recently, and it's already one of my all time favourites. It's 'Constellations' by Armand Coeck. I'm a big fan of the slightly crazier modern stuff: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O3JO985grFY

AND SO I WATCH YOU FROM AFAR

#2
I was about to enter a school to get my classical music degree, but, as a matter of fact, I found out that it was for classic guitar not electric, so I started learning Bouree. Since I couldn't play it, I gave up my classical music degree dream.
#4
Ah maybe I should have said, all modern and flamenco stuff etc is welcome - doesn't have to be traditional 19th century classical guitar. I was just using it as the broad term.

One of my friends is always sending me videos of the music from Final Fantasy played on the guitar. Some of it is very nice!

AND SO I WATCH YOU FROM AFAR

#6
I enjoy listening to classical guitar being played(Constellations is a great piece), but I am a very very bad classical guitarist.
#7
does neoclassical count? hehe

im trying to learn steve vai's version of paganini's caprice no.5 from the movie the crossroads. its hard as hell
#10
Check out the Naxos music library for hundreds of hours worth of not just Classical Guitar music but tons of classical music!

Check out Bach's Lute suites, specifically, BWV 996 and BWV 997, IMO they're his best lute suites.

You can also check out Roland Dyens, Augustin Barrios, Brouwer, Giuliani, Francisco Tarrega, Johann Kasper Mertz, Luigi Legnani, Fernando Sor, Giulio Regondi, Stepan Rak, Nikita Koshkin, Matteo Carcassi, Paganini, the list goes on!
#11
Hello classical thread, a total newbie here!

My dad recently finished renovating his old classical guitar. Half of the parts were changed during the guitar's lifetime, but the guitar itself is dated for 1925!

So, we finally have a second guitar in the house. I recently hit a wall in my electric guitar playing. I still love playing metal, but coudn't find the motivation to learn new songs. At this moment I'm mostly playing my band's songs only. So I decided to pick up classical guitar, to be more musically diverse. Also, I love classical music, but I'm no fan of neoclassical shred music.

I'm a total newb when it comes to classical. I have the basics, which I brought from electric, but I still need a lot of work. I have lots of problems with fingerpicking, I've been playing with a pick only for almost 4 years!

At this moment I'm learning this version of Greensleeves:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uXYhgb1ADts

Also I'm trying to learn Fur Elise, but without the middle part for now, that's just too hard.

Cheers everybody!
For a real pervert, any exit can be an entrance.
Quote by sTx
Awesome post, dude.

Gear:
Epiphone Les Paul Studio Goth
Peavey Valveking 112
My metal band, Nilfgaard
#12
TS, I really enjoyed the piece you posted! Never heard of it before but it's quite an interesting piece. I'm currently learning La Catedral by Augustin Barrios, Caprichio Arabe by Tarrega, and Sonata Op. 15 by Fernando Sor. I'm absolutely loving classical guitar right now.
#13
Quote by RobinTrower12
TS, I really enjoyed the piece you posted! Never heard of it before but it's quite an interesting piece. I'm currently learning La Catedral by Augustin Barrios, Caprichio Arabe by Tarrega, and Sonata Op. 15 by Fernando Sor. I'm absolutely loving classical guitar right now.

do you have a classical guitar teacher?
because those are some awfully difficult pieces and disastrous if played with wrong technique.

that being said.

im a classical guitarist studying myself. ive only been at it for about 5 months (for 2 years in guitar, in general, started on electric). but my reading skills and memorizing skills are very good for the time ive been playing classical guitar. im currently studying heitor villa lobos etude no 7. and the Antonio Lauro Venezuelan waltzes. very beautiful pieces.

i study under james hunley. an amazing guitarist. very close friends with pepe romero. theyre in the same league.

and to the guy asking about albums.
look on amazon. youll find amazing cd's for less than 6 bucks!!

my suggestions are looking for these guitarists: John Williams, Pepe Romero, Manuel Barrueco, Leo Brouwer, Narciso Yepes, Roland Dyens, Julian Bream, Christopher Parkening. and theres a lot more!
Classical Guitarist
Last edited by Zep_shizzle at Aug 25, 2010,
#14
Quote by Zep_shizzle
do you have a classical guitar teacher?
because those are some awfully difficult pieces and disastrous if played with wrong technique.

that being said.

im a classical guitarist studying myself. ive only been at it for about 5 months (for 2 years in guitar, in general, started on electric). but my reading skills and memorizing skills are very good for the time ive been playing classical guitar. im currently studying heitor villa lobos etude no 7. and the Antonio Lauro Venezuelan waltzes. very beautiful pieces.

i study under james hunley. an amazing guitarist. very close friends with pepe romero. theyre in the same league.

and to the guy asking about albums.
look on amazon. youll find amazing cd's for less than 6 bucks!!

my suggestions are looking for these guitarists: John Williams, Pepe Romero, Manuel Barrueco, Leo Brouwer, Narciso Yepes, Roland Dyens, Julian Bream, Christopher Parkening. and theres a lot more!


Capricho Arabe isn't exactly a demanding piece technically, even though balancing all the voices well and making it sound professional is a huge ask for most players, playing it to the general public isn't as much of an issue. Just sayin'

Williams has an amazing tone and technique, I want his Smallman!!

BTW, to any aspiring classical guitarists, do not try to emulate Bream's technique, it's horribly inefficient but his musical expression is incredible!
#15
Quote by XianXiuHong
Capricho Arabe isn't exactly a demanding piece technically

ok. w/e you say.
Classical Guitarist
#16
Quote by Zep_shizzle
ok. w/e you say.


I was thinking the same thing. Those 32nds are a breeze.
#18
I've been playing the song for a pretty long while and I still can't get that speed burst reliably. I think it's a talent issue.. speed just does _not_ work for me.

edit: Don't know if it's been mentioned but if you're self training or just planning on taking lessons for a shorter while getting a good book like pumping nylon will help your playing quite a bit with correct hand positioning and in depth explanations of how to do your nails and how to work up speed.
My brother has been playing for quite a few years by himself and always had a bit of trouble with his nails, hand position etc and after just a month with the book he plays a _lot_ better.
Last edited by keffbanan at Aug 26, 2010,
#19
Quote by XianXiuHong
The tempo's slow enough they may as well be 16ths at allegro, it's not even a very long speed burst

wow. you must be an amazing concert performer to be saying caprichio arabe is easy. pepe romero and my teacher have been playing a very long time. and they both say its a very difficult piece. but gee. your obviously more skilled than both of them. so ill take your word for it.

ill make sure to watch you in concert when you play in los angeles.
Classical Guitarist
#20
Could you guys recommend me a good beginner song to learn? I'm looking for something classical, and with a melancholic atmosphere.
For a real pervert, any exit can be an entrance.
Quote by sTx
Awesome post, dude.

Gear:
Epiphone Les Paul Studio Goth
Peavey Valveking 112
My metal band, Nilfgaard
#21
Quote by XianXiuHong
The tempo's slow enough they may as well be 16ths at allegro, it's not even a very long speed burst


She's right. The point of that run is not how fast you play it, it's the beauty of the line. Think of it as if a cellist like Rostropovich or Casals would play it.

Capricho is an extremely advanced piece musically. Many players play it and butcher it by taking the time out of context in places where they shouldn't, such as the main melody line.
#22
Quote by Worhan
Could you guys recommend me a good beginner song to learn? I'm looking for something classical, and with a melancholic atmosphere.

Romanza Anonymous, or lagrima by tarrega.
Classical Guitarist
#23
Quote by whocares09
She's right. The point of that run is not how fast you play it, it's the beauty of the line. Think of it as if a cellist like Rostropovich or Casals would play it.

Capricho is an extremely advanced piece musically. Many players play it and butcher it by taking the time out of context in places where they shouldn't, such as the main melody line.



Thank you, that's the point I was trying to make.

If you listen to the recording Anabel Montesinos has in the Naxos Library of the piece, you'll notice that she doesn't focus on the speed of the run but the musicality of it. Listen to any of the recordings on the Naxos library and you'll find that next to none of them actually belt out the run as fast as they can.
#25
Quote by Zep_shizzle
Romanza Anonymous, or lagrima by tarrega.


Thanks man, checking them out

EDIT:
I just listened to Romance, I remember this piece! It's very beautiful, thanks for recomending this!
For a real pervert, any exit can be an entrance.
Quote by sTx
Awesome post, dude.

Gear:
Epiphone Les Paul Studio Goth
Peavey Valveking 112
My metal band, Nilfgaard
Last edited by Worhan at Aug 28, 2010,
#26
Quote by Worhan
Thanks man, checking them out

EDIT:
I just listened to Romance, I remember this piece! It's very beautiful, thanks for recomending this!


theres alot more out there and your welcome.
Classical Guitarist
#27
@XianXiuHong
That piece you posted = WOW. Haven't heard of that composer, but that piece looks incredibly difficult. Is he... tremolo-ing doublestops? Never even knew that was possible.

Oh and why do you say that about Bream's technique? What's different about it?

I recently got a new teacher, a much much better one than my last. Currently working on Sor's 'Variations on a theme by Mozart'. Variations 1-3 aren't so bad, think I need to spend some time on 4 and 5.

Anyone else a fan of the Britten Nocturnal? http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ODIv1COOiJo

AND SO I WATCH YOU FROM AFAR

#28
Quote by Morgy
@XianXiuHong
That piece you posted = WOW. Haven't heard of that composer, but that piece looks incredibly difficult. Is he... tremolo-ing doublestops? Never even knew that was possible.

Oh and why do you say that about Bream's technique? What's different about it?

I recently got a new teacher, a much much better one than my last. Currently working on Sor's 'Variations on a theme by Mozart'. Variations 1-3 aren't so bad, think I need to spend some time on 4 and 5.

Anyone else a fan of the Britten Nocturnal? http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ODIv1COOiJo


Yep, it's a cross string thing, it takes forever to get consistently even and at a good speed but when you get the technique down, it's going to give you so much control over your normal tremolo it's totally worth it. Lots of players actually play their trills with cross string technique for the ornamentation in baroque music and whatnot so there's a similar concept there. Some players tend to do the trills with a P-A-I-M sequence but in Balalaika, Rak's fingering is P-A-M-I, just like a normal tremolo technique. I've been trying to do both actually, P-A-I-M requires much more focus and control though but it helps overall finger independence and sounds much more even than P-A-M-I in the long run IMO.

Bream's technique is terribly tense, not to say he didn't have chops but there are many inherent flaws in his efficiency of movement which could lead many players down bad habits if they try to emulate his hand position and motions. His musical ideas were brilliant though, there's no doubt about that.

Stepan Rak uses the cross string technique quite often and the 4 finger back and forth tremolo is probably his signature technique, he's the pioneer (I'm not sure about inventor) of it. If you look up the pieces "In praise of tea" and "Dance around the Linden tree" by him, you'll find the same back and forth tremolo there.
Last edited by XianXiuHong at Aug 30, 2010,
#29
Currently working on Bach's Prelude BWV 998, which is awesome. I can recommend this to anyone - it's magical. I also like to play BWV 999, which is more common. Love that one too.

I also play some Tarrega, Weiss and Giuliani. I also wish to learn some Dowland pieces (e.g. The Frog Galliard), but haven't yet.
#32
Quote by HGedia
I completly boner on Jeese cook

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TcIYyIbpMt4

Can you kind folks suggest some thing for starters ? I am working on Spanish romance at the moment... I Loooooooove spanish music... so any suggestions for beginners will be greeted with cyber hugs



Study No 6 Opus 60 - Fernando Sor
Ejercicio from Coleccion 10a de Ejercicios - Jose Ferrer
Sicilliene No 2 Opus 34 - Ferdinando Carulli
Landler No 4 Opus 9 - Johann Kasper Mertz

Those are all easy beginners pieces but should challenge you if you don't read music often.