#1
guitarist looking to purchase a bass. Not looking for a top of the line best ever bass... just as solid, versitale, powerful bass for around $300 that I can play around with and maybe upgrade pickups and some hardware to make it a GREAT bass ...Should I go....

Squire 60's classic vibe jazz
http://bass-guitars.musiciansfriend.com/product/Squier-Classic-Vibe-Jazz-Bass-60s-Bass-Guitar-?sku=519578

OR

Peavey Millenium BPX
http://bass-guitars.musiciansfriend.com/product/Peavey-Millennium-BXP-4String-Bass-Guitar?sku=511369#used

OR any other suggestions would be great... THANKS.
Last edited by jsspang at Aug 22, 2010,
#2
Both of those are great basses, some of the best entry-level basses out there. In addition to the Classic Vibe Jazz and the Millennium, I'd suggest looking at the Classic Vibe Precision (Squier), the Vintage Modified Jazz (Squier), the Vintage Modified Precision (Squier), the Ibanez GSR200, and the Ibanez SR300 (a step above the GSR200). You can't really go wrong with any of those.

Now since you're looking at purchasing a bass, what do you have planned for the amp?
Composite Aficionado


Spector and Markbass
#3
They're both really good, solid basses. I guess it all depends on which one you 'like' more. You should go to your local music shop and try out both basses, and whichever one you like the 'feel' of more you should go and buy.

In my opinion .. I would probably go for the Squire CV, to me it's more versatile and also, I just can't stand to look at that Peavey, it makes my eyeballs explode inside their sockets. Some people like that design, but I don't.
There was once a wise Chinese man who said:

"All you can eat, $12.50"
#4
Both are great basses. Personally I would go with the 60s jazz bass, because white jazz basses look stunning IMO, and jazzes very versatile. They're also one of the 'meat and potato' basses (along with the P bass); they sound great and will fit nicely in any style of music. The Peavey seems to have a similar configuration but the pickups could differ from the jazz's ones and miiight sound a bit different.

Try them both first though. But if you can't, then I'd say go with the jazz bass

EDIT: Also jazz bass necks tend to be quite comfortable for most people unless you have big hands or like chunky necks
Last edited by SuperMaximo93 at Aug 23, 2010,
#5
I have a CV jazz that I picked up after looking at a lot of the same options mentioned here. If you're looking to do upgrades later on it's an obvious choice; most parts that fit an MIM jazz are drop ins, where as on the vintage modified things like the neck pocket aren't identical. I don't know if the bridge or tuners are drop in replacements on the CV, but there's no reason to replace them.

Only "problem" with the CV jazz is that it has the "vintage" fret size, which is reasonably smaller than the jumbo frets on current fenders and may cause some fret buzz when you first pick it up, but I've come to love the fret size and it does allow for a much lower action than normal. Otherwise this bass is pretty much what you'd get with a MIM fender jazz.

That said, the peavey isn't nearly as ugly in real life as it is in pictures.
#6
As of this morning at least, Muscian's Friend has a used Peavey Millennium in Condition 3 (good) for $154. Condition 3 items supposedly have only minor cosmetic flaws and are returnable if you're not happy. For less than half the cost of a new one I'd personally think hard on the used one. A $165 savings will pay for some nice upgrade items...
#7
Quote by bass//player
They're both really good, solid basses. I guess it all depends on which one you 'like' more. You should go to your local music shop and try out both basses, and whichever one you like the 'feel' of more you should go and buy.

In my opinion .. I would probably go for the Squire CV, to me it's more versatile and also, I just can't stand to look at that Peavey, it makes my eyeballs explode inside their sockets. Some people like that design, but I don't.


How is the Squier CV more versatile than the Peavey? Both of them are passive jazz bass w/ the same vol/vol/tone configuration.

The major difference between the two is the string spacing, and neck radius. The Peavey have a narrower string spacing, and the neck is a lot slimmer than the Squier. The Peavey also have a longer upper horn, which balance very well when standing up. It's a big plus since the neck will be heavier than basswood body. One thing I like about the peavey is that the truss rod wheel is located at the heel of the neck vs the head of the neck. It makes truss rod adjustment a lot easier. I think the Peavey looks stunning w/ the flamed maple quilted top, and a great alternative w/ all the Squiers out there. But if you have big hands, and prefer wider string spacing, I would go w/ the Squier.
#8
Great input guys!!! Thanks so much. See as a guitar player I was always told avoid squires like the plague. I was kinda shocked to find they make pretty descent quality basses.

Personally I think both basses LOOK great. But lets be realistic... looks aren't everything. I am going to play them both then make my own decision. I was glad to hear most people think they're both pretty solid. As we ALL know gear is great when we first buy it, but it can tend to get old fast. So I am pretty much looking for something that is a good starting point and easily upgradeable.

I actually LOVE the tone of the P bass but being new to the bass game I figured it would be wise to pick something that is versitle until I get my style pin pointed. Correct me if I'm wrong but I've been told a P bass is a P bass and nothing more, nothing less. But with a jazz I can get CLOSE to the P bass tone, but also a lot of other tones. That is why I gravitated towards the Jass vs the P. I am not real hardcore or heavy metal for the most part, I love all kinds of music, but hard, fast, and aggressive isn't always my thing so that is why a P may not be the best for me... right or wrong???

As for amps once again im not very experienced with bass. I know I want prob a 10" Def not an 8". I do NOT need anything that will pulverize my house to the ground or send vibes through a huge crowd. I am just a hobbiest that sincerely LOVES soo many different styles of music. Im playin at home with another guitarist, sometimes just bass, never a drummer or on gigs. So I got some ideas but would LOVE some advice in this area too if anyone has any...

Thanks guys!!
Last edited by jsspang at Aug 23, 2010,
#9
Quote by jsspang
I actually LOVE the tone of the P bass but being new to the bass game I figured it would be wise to pick something that is versitle until I get my style pin pointed. Correct me if I'm wrong but I've been told a P bass is a P bass and nothing more, nothing less. But with a jazz I can get CLOSE to the P bass tone, but also a lot of other tones. That is why I gravitated towards the Jass vs the P. I am not real hardcore or heavy metal for the most part, I love all kinds of music, but hard, fast, and aggressive isn't always my thing so that is why a P may not be the best for me... right or wrong???

Not technically right. The best way to put it is that the Jazz bass is a chameleon, its very versatile, and can "mold itself" (for lack of a better phrase) to fit into any genre. Something to note though is that while the Jazz may get close, it will won't be able to fully nail the Precision tone, they're apples and oranges. A Precision bass is indeed just a P bass, it will always sound like a P bass. However, the P is just as versatile in the fact that the signature Precision bass tone has a place in every type of music. The P is a bit punchier sounding, but its never out of place, and you can easily do any genre with either a Precision or Jazz.

The thing you should be looking for in deciding between a P or a J is the feel, namely when it comes to the neck. The Precision's neck is chunkier, and the Jazz's more narrow. You should try both from comparable lines (VM P vs. VM J, or CV P vs. CV J) and see what's more comfortable to you.

As for amps, take a look at the Acoustic B20, the Peavey MAX series, and the Kustom KBA series. Try looking used too, the Kustom's turn up for next to nothing, they're built well, and they're loud for such little practice amps.
Composite Aficionado


Spector and Markbass
Last edited by Tostitos at Aug 23, 2010,
#10
actually the Acoustic B20 is the amp I had intended to purchase. I know it is a 12x20 which is not exactly a "cookie cutter" type amp as in it is an unusual set up. But based soley on reviews it sounds to be a great amp. I swear to god the acoustic and the Kustom are the exact same amp with a different name silk screened on it. Look at the specs, AND look at the pics side by side...

other amps I considered are the fender rumble 30, a peavey 110 and a behringer. I know a lot of people talk trash on berhinger but the amp has great reviews. The thing I like best is the built in eq... seriously.. they can't be that crappy or they wouldn't be in buisness... no???
#11
In all honesty, get whichever bass FEELS better. That ends up being much more important in the long run, especially if you are planning on upgrading.

Behringer makes some good quality products... but those products are usually not bass amps. Behringer has a bed rep in the bass amp line of business for a reason, they have low quality control and measure their wattage differently. You could get a Behringer and it could be the best amp ever and you might never have a problem. That being said, the reason they are not suggested is because you have a bigger chance of getting a Behringer that fails repeatedly and disappoints.

I have heard good things about Acoustic amps, they tend to be very transparent sound wise and reliable. I have a Fender amp and it does me proud, but I don't know about the rumble series. I also don't know much about peavey amps.

I hope this helps!
Gear:

Fender Jazz
Spector Legend Custom 5
Yamaha BB415

Fender Bassman 400 Pro
#12

Quote:
Originally Posted by bass//player
They're both really good, solid basses. I guess it all depends on which one you 'like' more. You should go to your local music shop and try out both basses, and whichever one you like the 'feel' of more you should go and buy.

In my opinion .. I would probably go for the Squire CV, to me it's more versatile and also, I just can't stand to look at that Peavey, it makes my eyeballs explode inside their sockets. Some people like that design, but I don't.



How is the Squier CV more versatile than the Peavey? Both of them are passive jazz bass w/ the same vol/vol/tone configuration.

The major difference between the two is the string spacing, and neck radius. The Peavey have a narrower string spacing, and the neck is a lot slimmer than the Squier. The Peavey also have a longer upper horn, which balance very well when standing up. It's a big plus since the neck will be heavier than basswood body. One thing I like about the peavey is that the truss rod wheel is located at the heel of the neck vs the head of the neck. It makes truss rod adjustment a lot easier. I think the Peavey looks stunning w/ the flamed maple quilted top, and a great alternative w/ all the Squiers out there. But if you have big hands, and prefer wider string spacing, I would go w/ the Squier.


SORRY BRO. But I did say "to me" ..

Oh yeah, and for amps, look Acoustic and Kustom (as you mentioned) and also look second hand Peaveys <-- they're all good, especially for the price.
There was once a wise Chinese man who said:

"All you can eat, $12.50"
Last edited by bass//player at Aug 24, 2010,
#13
Quote by jsspang
I know a lot of people talk trash on berhinger but the amp has great reviews. The thing I like best is the built in eq... seriously.. they can't be that crappy or they wouldn't be in buisness... no???

They're in business because people will always impulse buy good-looking products without doing proper research or trying things out before buying. Behringer misrepresents the wattage on their amps, and their QC is the stuff of horror stories. Some people never have problems with their products, but a lot of people do, and many of us won't recommend Behringer because of the frequency of bad experiences. It's simply too much of a risk, you either get a gem or a lemon (but most likely a lemon), when you can spend your money on a much more reliable, much more well-built product.
Composite Aficionado


Spector and Markbass