#1
And I need help.

Former electric guitar player and Im LOVING the bass! I wish I didnt waste a year and a half playing that high pitched wussy and I started with my growler

Anyway, I downloaded a PDF of the scales for the bass guitar, what else should I look for to get me started on learning to play bass?

Also, Im going to play with a pick. Might as well, considering I have picking experience anyway. Plus I think it gives a much better tone for metal than finger style
"Music is felt through our soul, not heard with our ears" - Sully Erna

Current Gear:
Ibanez SR755 5-string bass
Acoustic B10 amplifier
Line 6 POD UX1
#2
As both a guitarist and a bassist, i'd try and avoid that kind of narrow-mindedness; both instruments have their merits, and playing both sure comes in handy when you start recording tracks.

I'd recommend looking into techniques, it'd be easy to stick with a pick because that's all you know, but also very limiting; become comfortable just finger picking before you move onto slapping, popping etc.

Also, familiarise yourself with some chords.
#3
Since you're a bass player, make your metronome a part of you. Carry it with yourself everywhere you go. Listen to it while you sleep. Bring it to school/work. Have it on 24/7. Memorize it.

Practice with your feet stomping the rhythm.
Playing metal? Did I mention your metronome is your best friend?

Picking is just fine as long as you dont mind an army of ignorant fools attacking you just because you youse a pick.
#4
Quote by ParasiticTwins
As both a guitarist and a bassist, i'd try and avoid that kind of narrow-mindedness; both instruments have their merits, and playing both sure comes in handy when you start recording tracks.

I'd recommend looking into techniques, it'd be easy to stick with a pick because that's all you know, but also very limiting; become comfortable just finger picking before you move onto slapping, popping etc.

Also, familiarise yourself with some chords.


I just got really bored of the electric guitar. NO matter how low I tuned, I couldnt get that "low" I wanted, and I found out later as I got into music that I follow rhythm more than harmony/melody.


Quote by PRSfanatic
Since you're a bass player, make your metronome a part of you. Carry it with yourself everywhere you go. Listen to it while you sleep. Bring it to school/work. Have it on 24/7. Memorize it.

Practice with your feet stomping the rhythm.
Playing metal? Did I mention your metronome is your best friend?

Picking is just fine as long as you dont mind an army of ignorant fools attacking you just because you youse a pick.


hehe, I will make sure to pick up a metronome as well. I wont mind the hate. All I care about is the tone I want. Picking gives me that
"Music is felt through our soul, not heard with our ears" - Sully Erna

Current Gear:
Ibanez SR755 5-string bass
Acoustic B10 amplifier
Line 6 POD UX1
#5
I personally find that picks are too percussive for metal. It's to.... hmmm... striking and harsh for me. I like the smoothness of finger style. I slay metal bass with fingers, but that's just me. I would learn all styles of playing, dump your girlfriend for a metronome, and learn to play scales.
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Black people play bass.
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Just forget I said anything.

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THE PURE SEXUAL THRILL!!!!
And stuff...

^^^
On playing bass.
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#6
Can tell me where u get the bass scales/ chords from? Prefer if downloadable. I just started learning bass by myself. Thanks for helping out.
#8
Learn to be comfortable with lots of different styles and feels of music, and learn your chords and your fretboard. I'm gonna reinforce the metronome thing as well, and practicing with one often will give you a very solid internal rhythm, which is valuable.

Would it be wrong to say you've made the right choice?

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#9
Why bash on guitar?
I've played guitar for three years before I switched to bass and it really helped me.
I already knew all the notes on the bass/guitar, I already knew theory and chords. So guitar to bass is actually a really good switch. I suggest learning your fretboard.
Know what every single note is, every single octave. then after that, Look up some blues or jazz charts and play a long with those. then once you got the roots down you can add in some walks, like half step approach or something like that. Sure you can just look up tabs for the songs you want to play. but that isn't playing a bass or guitar. It's wasting your time and it can only give you playing skill. Learn your theory, then you can do that stuff. You won't regret it. I made that mistake by overloading on tabs. That's why it gets boring cause you aren't improving.
#10
Just wondering, what PDF did you downlaod?

looks interesting and I need to learn some more scales
"You have brains in your head,
You have feet in your shoes,
You can steer yourself,
any direction you choose,
You're on your own,
And you know what you know,
And YOU are the one who'll decide where to go."

- Dr. Seuss
#11
Quote by Rancid Ivy
Just wondering, what PDF did you downlaod?

looks interesting and I need to learn some more scales


http://www.easymusiclessons.com/bass-scales.html

register your e-mail and they will send you bass scales.


I'm not just into metal. Im into other alternative stuff like Red Hot Chili Peppers (flea ROCKS) and Steve Miller Band

I will try to get into finger stlye as well. Im going to take a few lessons from a bass instructor to get the feel of it, and he said he'll teach me theory and fundamentals and whatnot.

Not bashing guitar, I just dont find it as fun as the bass. I always respect great solos and the players (dan donegan, zoltan bathory, reb beach etc)
"Music is felt through our soul, not heard with our ears" - Sully Erna

Current Gear:
Ibanez SR755 5-string bass
Acoustic B10 amplifier
Line 6 POD UX1
#12
You should learn the major scale first, it gives you the base knowledge to talk about theory since every note is described relative to it no matter what you are doing. Not just patterns but learn the intervals between notes and how to find them on the fretboard.

Then instead of learning chords you could start with triads which are really 3 note chords. If you learn triads you'll know more about the theory then just memorizing chords and be able to advance a lot faster. Triads are often nested inside the scale so you dont even have to know the full name of the chord you are playing.

After that learn minor scale (easy if you know major well since its just a couple shifts), and then probably some technique and you'll be set.
#13
You seem to have pretty good taste. A lot of bassists bash Flea, but I think he comes up with some great lines. The first few songs I learned were "Taste The Pain" (start with finger style then develop slap/popping) and "Soul to Squeeze' by RHCP.

A few good songs to learn while still starting out:

-"Science of Selling Yourself Short" by Less Than Jake
-"Are You Gonna Go My Way" by Lenny Kravitz
-"Should I Stay Or Should I Go?" by The Clash
-"The Joker" or "Rock'n Me" by Steve Miller Band
-"Polar Opposites" by Modest Mouse.

None of the songs are particularly difficult, but serve two purposes for a guitarist-turned-bassist like you and me: They put you in the bass mindset, which is all about rhythm, but they also are all over the neck, making you comfortable with your new instrument. THey're more lead centric, too, but still support the total sound of the song, if that makes sense.

But, for theory based stuff, I completely agree with learning the melodic/harmonic Major scale, first.

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#15
Quote by mauler5858
Not always the case, its all about skill:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gz-oxs90X6Y


he's a good bassist. I watch a couple of his mudvayne covers.


I went to my first bass lesson today and the guy is a great instructor. in 5 minutes, he taught me how to read sheet music and proper technique for playing finger style.
"Music is felt through our soul, not heard with our ears" - Sully Erna

Current Gear:
Ibanez SR755 5-string bass
Acoustic B10 amplifier
Line 6 POD UX1
#18
Quote by aguacateojos
Listen to music. All sorts of music. All the time. Play along. Play with any musicians you can. Preferably those who are better than you. But find a solid drummer and your playing will improve at an unbelievable pace.


I second this, and add that you should also play with people that are not as good as you as well, because as Les Claypool says, you'll learn from both.

Never refuse a gig or a jam session. Even if its not what you want to groove with, you'll learn and build skill from it. You also might find a genre you never thought you'd love. Bass made me love jazz and exposed me to music I would have never played or listened to if I hadn't picked up the instrument.

Other pieces of advise? Try to get some face time with a teacher or at least an experienced bass player. It will save you considerable time in learning and will help you not to pick up bad technique, esp. since you are coming over from guitar.

Record yourself periodically. It will help you see how you've progressed and help you focus on the things you need to continue to improve on.

And btw, many times becoming a solid bass player will make you a better guitar player in the long run, if you go back to playing guitar at some point.
#19
Quote by grantyshmanty
LoweRider: TELL ME.



tell you what?? The meaning of my username? :p
"Music is felt through our soul, not heard with our ears" - Sully Erna

Current Gear:
Ibanez SR755 5-string bass
Acoustic B10 amplifier
Line 6 POD UX1