#1
hey guys,
i'm an intermediate-ish guitarist - playing for a year and a half, can tap with three fingers on my right hand and pinch harmonic, reasonable picking speed and fingerwork, can barre fairly easily, can sort of fingerpick, i know chord construction, major, minor, pentatonic and blues scales (and i invented the arabic scale [no, not the harmonic minor]) and i can improv in various moods to some extent (not good, but not terrible either)

anyway, halfway through my guitar lesson today i got distracted and asked my teacher about exercises to increase my picking speed, so he showed me a few and i followed him, but he told me my right hand (hand, not wrist) shouldnt be resting on the guitar.
this confused the hell out of me, because i've always rested the side of my hand on the bridge while picking notes on the same two or three strings (chords and crap attempts at sweep picking excluded, of course)

the exercises went through all the strings though, and worked the left hand too.
a couple of examples:

e--1--4--2--4--3--4--2--4-- on all the strings, and then back up, and then inverted and so on.

e--3---------------------
b-----2-----3-----------
g--------1-----2----------
d-----------------1------- and so on, backwards and inverted and whatnot.


so, basically my question is:
should the right hand always be "floating" above the guitar during any picking (aside from palm muting), or may it change positions to suit what's being played?

for the second exercise it's instinctive for the hand to float, but for the first my hand would naturally rest on the bridge and shift slightly every time i change string (it doesn't slow down the actual process at all though)

thanks, and i hope my awful wording didnt confuse you too much
#2
your hand SHOULD be touching the guitar, otherwise you end up using your elbow, which would a) be incredibly hard to be accurate and b) you could do some damage

i think he means not to anchor your hand i.e. rest your fingers on the guitar while picking - but its just opinion really
the first way to do the exercise would be the normal way


P.S. i dont think it was necessary to tell us your personal achievements
Quote by BlitzkriegAir
1. Get drunk
2. play pentatonic scales fast
3. throw in some divebombs and pinch harmonics
4. Get killed onstage
5. become legendary guitarist instantaneously


Quote by Holy Katana

How dare you attack the greatness of the augmented sixth?
#3
Just some things I've learned along the way.

1. Slow is fast. If you can't play it slow, you can't play it fast. Speed comes with time and practice.
2. It's all in the wrist.
3. Pick style is unique to everyone. Look at Marty Friedman's pick style. I'm sure ANY guitar teacher would have highly advised against something like that. Pick a comfortable posture and one that allows you to make the small quick movements you need to make.

Just my two cents.
#4
Quote by ruletheneck
hey guys,
i'm an intermediate-ish guitarist - playing for a year and a half, can tap with three fingers on my right hand and pinch harmonic, reasonable picking speed and fingerwork, can barre fairly easily, can sort of fingerpick, i know chord construction, major, minor, pentatonic and blues scales (and i invented the arabic scale [no, not the harmonic minor]) and i can improv in various moods to some extent (not good, but not terrible either)

anyway, halfway through my guitar lesson today i got distracted and asked my teacher about exercises to increase my picking speed, so he showed me a few and i followed him, but he told me my right hand (hand, not wrist) shouldnt be resting on the guitar.
this confused the hell out of me, because i've always rested the side of my hand on the bridge while picking notes on the same two or three strings (chords and crap attempts at sweep picking excluded, of course)

the exercises went through all the strings though, and worked the left hand too.
a couple of examples:

e--1--4--2--4--3--4--2--4-- on all the strings, and then back up, and then inverted and so on.

e--3---------------------
b-----2-----3-----------
g--------1-----2----------
d-----------------1------- and so on, backwards and inverted and whatnot.


so, basically my question is:
should the right hand always be "floating" above the guitar during any picking (aside from palm muting), or may it change positions to suit what's being played?

for the second exercise it's instinctive for the hand to float, but for the first my hand would naturally rest on the bridge and shift slightly every time i change string (it doesn't slow down the actual process at all though)

thanks, and i hope my awful wording didnt confuse you too much


personally, I think that playing non-musical exercises are mostly counterproductive.

Focusing on technique is good, but do so in a way that the context of music is not ignored.

regarding your specific technique questions... there are various opinions on this. I would say get a teacher and work with them through the basics. trying to learn by reading through the various arguments online will likely to lead to more confusion.
shred is gaudy music
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Aug 24, 2010,
#5
Quote by GuitarMunky
personally, I think that playing non-musical exercises are mostly counterproductive.

Focusing on technique is good, but do so in a way that the context of music is not ignored.



+1

Too many promoting doing chromatic 4 note patterns all over the neck all day, what's the point? You'll never use that in a song, it would just be better to learn some licks that have 4 chromatic notes in a row that you can actually use.
#6
Quote by GuitarMunky
personally, I think that playing non-musical exercises are mostly counterproductive.

Focusing on technique is good, but do so in a way that the context of music is not ignored.

.


+1

Like a d*ck I wasted so much time on these pointless exercises. Just glad I know better now and focus my attention on being a better musician - not how fast I can play guitar.
#7
Although it could be argued that those exercises can be useful if you play them sticking to a particular scale/key.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
Soundcloud
#8
What your describing is anchoring, and it should be avoided. You can rest your arm on the guitar, but your hand/fingers shouldn't touch the guitar. Now, you could touch the guitar with your hand/fingers, but only if you don't depend on the guitar to keep your hand in place and do so very lightly.

But this excludes actual techniques that require you your hand to touch the guitar, such as palm muting, of course. The point is that anchoring doesn't become a habit.
^^The above is a Cryptic Metaphor^^


"To know the truth of history is to realize its ultimate myth and its inevitable ambiguity." Everything is made up and the facts don't matter.


MUSIC THEORY LINK
#9
the non musical exercises are really good at 2 things, finger independence and being non musical, while they are awesome finger exercises, like GM said you might as well be doing something musical since in the end they'll accomplish the same thing

i try to tell everyone i meet to play with a floating palm (everyone who plays and wants to listen and actually improve) its helped my accuracy and speed more than i could possibly express with words. it was worth spending the roughly 8 months relearning the guitar.
#10
ok, thanks guys. floating palm it is and to the guys who told me not to waste my time on these, i'm only gonna be doing them for a couple of weeks on the side (im still learning songs), just to help me learn something musical that WILL increase my ability, probably Cliffs Of Dover or something like that where a decent picking speed and finger coordination would help
thanks again