#1
I'm thinking about switching my combo amp for a head and a cab, but i got some questions about it.

Whats the difference with a rack and a head/top bass amp? i've seen alot of bass players using rack only (i.e Victor Wooten and Toshiya of Dir and Grey) so which one is better?

Solid state (transistors) vs tube amps, i suppose tube amps are better but are they really that much better for bass??

What brand do you guys suggest to get? so far i was thinking about Ampeg, Hartke and Peavey, any advice on brands or your own opinion?

And what type/kind and size of speakers cabs are the best?
Thanks alot guys
Gear,
- LakLand 55-01 Quilted maple top
- Epiphone Korina Explorer bass
- Hartke HA 3500
- Peavey BX 115
- Peavey Minx 110 amp
- Crafter acoustic guitar
Last edited by phoenix555 at Aug 25, 2010,
#2
is this for playing gigs or recording ?
for gigs i wouldnt bother with tube amps.. its not gonna be that noticable.. something like a peavey fire or nitrobass would be great

recording i would look into your svt's and other nice tube amps
#3
Difference between rack and head/top is that rack's are meant to go along with other rack gear. Heads can stand alone.
You can use a rack without a rack though. Just make sure you put some sort of padding down between the head and the cab because the vibrations can knock the circuits loose. I just a a layer of foam mattress on top of my cab to cushion it. It's been fine.

Solid State is just reliable, and a pretty mailable sound. Tubes give that classic, smooth, round, fat sound that you think of when you think of a bass. They're a bit tempermental and you have to be careful not to put them in a cold place, then bring them some place hot then some place cold and blah blah because the tubes will fail. And you have to buy new vacuum tubes when they break.

Brands? Like everything else (including the 2 things above), it depends on taste.
I can say that Peavey lies a bit about they're ratings, and though it may say "300 watts @ 8 Ohms" on it, it will be a much more distorted sound when you crank it as opposed to say, an Ampeg's "300 watts @ 8 Ohms" would sound. Also, my old teacher told me about Trace Elliot and how he's had about 3 of them and they've all died out of the blue for no reason. Then again, I've heard people swear by their TE's all day sooz
I personally like Gallien Krueger's I've never been more satisfied with an amp since my GK 700 RB came through the door. I've never had an issue with power in my 3 years of use.

But then again, get out there, try shit out (through the same cab and bass and cable) and see how it all sounds.
Your head is 60% of your tone is your head, so choose wisely, mein freund.
Quote by Banjocal
sht up u flthy librl foogit stfu u soo mad n butthurdt ur ass is an analpocolypse cuz ur so gay "my ass hrts so mcuh" - u. your rectally vexed n anlly angushed lolo go bck 2 asslnd lolol
#4
So basically a rack is the same as a head/top but it can fit in a rack gear?
Gear,
- LakLand 55-01 Quilted maple top
- Epiphone Korina Explorer bass
- Hartke HA 3500
- Peavey BX 115
- Peavey Minx 110 amp
- Crafter acoustic guitar
#5
Quote by phoenix555
So basically a rack is the same as a head/top but it can fit in a rack gear?

Yeah, they serve the same purpose to the best of my knowledge.

EDIT: I really hope I'm not the only one who's gonna give the guy help on this. I'm in no way a person who qualifies at giving advice on amps.
Quote by Banjocal
sht up u flthy librl foogit stfu u soo mad n butthurdt ur ass is an analpocolypse cuz ur so gay "my ass hrts so mcuh" - u. your rectally vexed n anlly angushed lolo go bck 2 asslnd lolol
Last edited by King Of Suede at Aug 25, 2010,
#6
ok, keep it coming!
Gear,
- LakLand 55-01 Quilted maple top
- Epiphone Korina Explorer bass
- Hartke HA 3500
- Peavey BX 115
- Peavey Minx 110 amp
- Crafter acoustic guitar
#7
rack mount can either be a head that mounts into a rack OR a seperate preamp and power amp. The plus to keeping it seperate is if you want to get more power or a different sound you only have to replace 1 of them, thus costing you less money for 1 change...if you get what i mean.

SS vs Tube is completely a taste thing when it comes to bass. Go try both for yourself. Most bassists use SS but some stick with SVT's etc.

I use a vb-2 tube amp personally but it keeps blowing fuses and i have to send it in AGAIN to try and figure out why....

brand-wise, as long as you like the tone and it doesn't say behringer on it you're generally pretty safe

Speaker size : 10's for tons of punch. 12's for good punch/ good lows(make great standalone speakers imo) 15's for a really deep sound. 18's mainly used in bi-amp systems where low frequencies go to the 18" speaker and the highs go to usually 10's or maybe 12's.
dean edge one 5 string
Schecter studio-4
Samick fairlane-6
Ibanez sb900
Ibanez btb775
Fender p bass special deluxe

Dean Del Sol
Ibanez prestige rg2610

Peavey TKO 65
Peavey vb-2
Quote by the_perdestrian
listen to revelation, for he is wise in the way of bass-fu
Last edited by Revelation at Aug 26, 2010,
#8
There can be a downside to rack-mount components...

Rack-mounted components were designed to be used in racks. Part of the advantage to a rack system is the enforced separation of components. The system is designed to optimize cooling air flow around the top, bottom, and sides of each component. So... when you decide to set a rack-mount head on a towel or piece of foam you may be defeating some or all of the cooling and reducing the service life accordingly. Depends on exactly which brand and component you're using. The higher end stuff will have their own built in muffin fans; the cheaper stuff will rely on heat sinks to dissipate the heat. If the air intake or exhaust is being blocked because the unit is sitting on the towel or foam then you will most certainly build up excess heat. Will this kill the unit? Maybe yes, maybe no, but it is not good for it.

If what you have is a rack mount and you want to use it without a rack then you need to put some 2"-3" "feet" on the rack to elevate the component so it can get air flow underneath it.

If you're buying a new unit then you probably do NOT want to buy a rack-mount unit unless you plan on buying a rack to go with it. The standard (non rack-mount) amp heads usually dissipate heat from the rear and/or top.
#9
Quote by VeloDog
There can be a downside to rack-mount components...

Rack-mounted components were designed to be used in racks. Part of the advantage to a rack system is the enforced separation of components. The system is designed to optimize cooling air flow around the top, bottom, and sides of each component. So... when you decide to set a rack-mount head on a towel or piece of foam you may be defeating some or all of the cooling and reducing the service life accordingly. Depends on exactly which brand and component you're using. The higher end stuff will have their own built in muffin fans; the cheaper stuff will rely on heat sinks to dissipate the heat. If the air intake or exhaust is being blocked because the unit is sitting on the towel or foam then you will most certainly build up excess heat. Will this kill the unit? Maybe yes, maybe no, but it is not good for it.

If what you have is a rack mount and you want to use it without a rack then you need to put some 2"-3" "feet" on the rack to elevate the component so it can get air flow underneath it.

If you're buying a new unit then you probably do NOT want to buy a rack-mount unit unless you plan on buying a rack to go with it. The standard (non rack-mount) amp heads usually dissipate heat from the rear and/or top.

Hmm, i could use 2 pieces of wood and cover it with foam and put under the rack or use rubber pads under the amp, to keep enough space between the cab and head
Gear,
- LakLand 55-01 Quilted maple top
- Epiphone Korina Explorer bass
- Hartke HA 3500
- Peavey BX 115
- Peavey Minx 110 amp
- Crafter acoustic guitar