#1
Short-and-sweet; Found while cleaning the second game I ever owned, a copy of Pokemon Silver. Couldn't wait to start it back up, but in the three years it's been sitting around, it's internal battery died, and it can't save. It still has enough of a charge left to keep my old save, but I want to know if there's any sort of way or service to switch the old battery out? Even if it'll mean starting over I'll take it, as that'd happen anyway once the battery flatlined.
THE FORUM UPDATE KILLED THE GRADIENT STAR

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#2
Go to a game website: they help you out.


Or the gaming thread.
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#3
Yes, you can change the battery in the cartridge, but it is a bitch to do...
#4
Didn't the old gameboys just use AA or AAA batteries? *scratches head*

Edit: Oh, you mean the cartridge battery. Never mind...
Last edited by crazysam23_Atax at Aug 24, 2010,
#5
Quote by robhc
Yes, you can change the battery in the cartridge, but it is a bitch to do...

This.

Also, why not just get an emulator? Seeing as you own the actual console and game, it's perfectly legal.
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Last edited by JagerSlushy at Aug 24, 2010,
#6
You know, I have NES cartridges that still save perfectly fine. Weird how it varies like that.

If you really want to do it, get a "GameBit" screwdriver and open it up, then it's just a matter of switching it out. I'd probably just buy another copy though.
#8
I actually did this once for a friend, I have the specific battery you'd need somewhere around here... As soon as I find it, I'll give the model number to you.


It's really not hard to do, if you have all the basic equipment and know what you're doing.

(Basic equipment: Soldering iron, solder, battery, needlenose pliers, and maybe a gamebit, as mentioned before Last one isn't necessary.)

(Know what you're doing: Make sure you desolder the old connection and new conncetion very quickly and carefully, you don't want the battery to explode and/or fry an IC.)
Last edited by SlayingDragons at Aug 24, 2010,
#9
I've heard it's damn near impossible, or if it is you're more likely to break the thing than save it. Sorry man. There's always emulators, but it's not the same
Quote by StratoCatser
Go to a game website: they help you out.


Or the gaming thread.

As a resident of the gaming thread, I think it's more likely we won't know. There's a chance someone will know, but probably not.
#10
Quote by JagerSlushy
This.

Also, why not just get an emulator? Seeing as you own the actual console and game, it's perfectly legal.


No, actually, it's still not legal, even if you own the game and console.

Quote by CaptDin
You know, I have NES cartridges that still save perfectly fine. Weird how it varies like that.

If you really want to do it, get a "GameBit" screwdriver and open it up, then it's just a matter of switching it out. I'd probably just buy another copy though.


It's because the clock in the pokemon G/S/C needed the battery to keep the time. If it goes, your save will as well. That's why all you NES games still work, they don't have clocks in them.
#11
Quote by cornmancer
I've heard it's damn near impossible, or if it is you're more likely to break the thing than save it. Sorry man. There's always emulators, but it's not the same

As a resident of the gaming thread, I think it's more likely we won't know. There's a chance someone will know, but probably not.


It's not hard to do at all, really, as long as you're careful.

(If you want me to do it, necrosis, I'd fix it for you. You just have to pay postage.)

SlayingEdit: The battery number is "CR2025."
Last edited by SlayingDragons at Aug 24, 2010,
#12
Quote by StratoCatser
Go to a game website: they help you out.


Or the gaming thread.


I don't need another forum to have the off-topic section of eat my life. And this was more of a hardware thing, so I didn't feel it'd fit.

Quote by JagerSlushy
This.

Also, why not just get an emulator? Seeing as you own the actual console and game, it's perfectly legal.


One word: Nostalgia. Booting up my old Gameboy(Still working and it's only one of two, the other having been replaced since my father fell on it. I'm on my sixth DS) to play that cartridge's copy of Pokemon Silver and enjoy it on a handheld. Is it illogical? Yes, but nostalgia often is. It was my second ever game and my introduction to RPG's, I really like it.

Quote by CaptDin
You know, I have NES cartridges that still save perfectly fine. Weird how it varies like that.

If you really want to do it, get a "GameBit" screwdriver and open it up, then it's just a matter of switching it out. I'd probably just buy another copy though.


That is odd. And the problem with buying new ones is that they're either beat-up, hacked, or expensive nowadays around here. Will look into one of those screwdrivers though.

Quote by crazysam23_Atax
You prolly could call up a Gamestop or something. Maybe they could fix it for you...


That may work, as I'm buddies with the manager of a local one, so it may be low cost if anything at all.

Quote by SlayingDragons
I actually did this once for a friend, I have the specific battery you'd need somewhere around here... As soon as I find it, I'll give the model number to you.


It's really not hard to do, if you have all the basic equipment and know what you're doing.

(Basic equipment: Soldering iron, solder, battery, needlenose pliers, and maybe a gamebit, as mentioned before Last one isn't necessary.)

(Know what you're doing: Make sure you desolder the old connection and new conncetion very quickly and carefully, you don't want the battery to explode and/or fry an IC.)


Awesome, thanks for the info once you get it.

(That could be a problem, as I don't own a soldering iron since whenever I solder, the thing I was soldering is in the trash five minutes later)

Quote by SlayingDragons
It's not hard to do at all, really, as long as you're careful.

(If you want me to do it, necrosis, I'd fix it for you. You just have to pay postage.)


Hmm...how much would that be?
THE FORUM UPDATE KILLED THE GRADIENT STAR

Baltimore Orioles: 2014 AL Eastern Division Champions, 2017: 75-87
Baltimore Ravens: 2012 World Champions, 2017: 3-3
2017 NFL Pick 'Em: 52-39
#13
Quote by necrosis1193



Hmm...how much would that be?


Depends on how you ship it, really.

It wouldn't be much, the cartridges are tiny. (As far as mailing items go.) Hell, you could probably mail it in a standard envelope.
#14
Quote by SlayingDragons
Depends on how you ship it, really.

It wouldn't be much, the cartridges are tiny. (As far as mailing items go.) Hell, you could probably mail it in a standard envelope.


Hmm...shall we continue via PM?
THE FORUM UPDATE KILLED THE GRADIENT STAR

Baltimore Orioles: 2014 AL Eastern Division Champions, 2017: 75-87
Baltimore Ravens: 2012 World Champions, 2017: 3-3
2017 NFL Pick 'Em: 52-39
#15
Quote by necrosis1193
Hmm...shall we continue via PM?


I guess we shall.


I gotta get off in like 2 minutes though, my mom's been getting really weird about me being on the computer since school started. -.-"
#16
Open it up.

Unclip the battery CAREFULLY. Now, insert the new one, CR2025 I believe, and just tape the clamps down onto it if you don't know how to solder. This is better imo because the battery's going to go dead later on and it will be a lot easier to just take the tape of and put a new one in.

Close it.

????

Play.
#17
My friend did this exact thing to his pokemon silver - Simply take the back off, take the battery out, replace it with the same type (we found it at wal-mart), replace the back.
Very simple.
#19
You can use electrical tape instead of a soldering iron. That's what I did for Pokemon Yellow and it works fine.
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#20
I hear its pretty simple, I had a friend get a Silver Version for free because the battery died on the original owner. Apparently its just a watch battery, and all you have to do is pop the cartridge open. (Don't quote me on that...)
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#22
Quick question because of something I read guys. One thing said that it's a rechargeable battery that eats from the AA's when it's used, meaning I could let it suck on the batteries in my GBA right now, then have everything happy again. Is this true or just a myth?
THE FORUM UPDATE KILLED THE GRADIENT STAR

Baltimore Orioles: 2014 AL Eastern Division Champions, 2017: 75-87
Baltimore Ravens: 2012 World Champions, 2017: 3-3
2017 NFL Pick 'Em: 52-39
#23
^That's not true, it's a watch battery.
Quote by cornmancer
As a resident of the gaming thread, I think it's more likely we won't know. There's a chance someone will know, but probably not.

The Pokemon Thread has discussed this quite a few times. You just need the right tools patience so you don't rush and snap anything and a watch battery.
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#24
Quote by necrosis1193
Quick question because of something I read guys. One thing said that it's a rechargeable battery that eats from the AA's when it's used, meaning I could let it suck on the batteries in my GBA right now, then have everything happy again. Is this true or just a myth?

Myth
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Do not speak as loud as my heart