#1
Basically why do we need 5 or so scale positions for the minor pentatonic or ANY scale for that matter? Can't I just move the scale up one more fret to get lets say an A scale then another to get an A# scale and so on. Why do we need positions?
#2
Because you only have 13 notes, and if a scale has 5, you can play the same notes in various positions.
#3
Quote by Dig_a_Pony
Basically why do we need 5 or so scale positions for the minor pentatonic or ANY scale for that matter? Can't I just move the scale up one more fret to get lets say an A scale then another to get an A# scale and so on. Why do we need positions?

I might have misunderstood your question but here goes: the scale positions are for staying in the same key while playing all around the fretboard. You're right about the fact that if you move THE SAME scale positions up or down you change the key but if you're playing A minor blues on the 5th fret and you wanna play on the 12th, then you might want to know the scale position up there. ALTHOUGH you can intuitively figure it out by just knowing the notes in the scale and finding them in different fret positions and not learning "fixed" patterns
Last edited by LightxGrenade at Aug 25, 2010,
#4
Quote by Juninho2v
Because you only have 13 notes, and if a scale has 5, you can play the same notes in various positions.


whut? 13?
#6
Scale patterns/positions are quick ways to play a scale in different places on the fretboard. You're not always going to play a C major scale in root position.
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea
#7
Quote by Dig_a_Pony
Basically why do we need 5 or so scale positions for the minor pentatonic or ANY scale for that matter? Can't I just move the scale up one more fret to get lets say an A scale then another to get an A# scale and so on. Why do we need positions?



Well you have a neck with 21 or more frets...... your hand can't stretch the entire span of the fretboard.
shred is gaudy music
#8
But if I play lets say first position on the 2nd fret that would be an F# pentatonic scale now if I play second position on the 2nd fret isnt it the same thing?
#9
Position 2 on the 2nd fret would be the E minor pentatonic, not the F# minor pentatonic.
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea
#10
Quote by food1010
Position 2 on the 2nd fret would be the E minor pentatonic, not the F# minor pentatonic.


hmmm doesnt position 2s root note start on 2nd fret just like position1 therefore calling it an F#?
#11
Quote by Dig_a_Pony
hmmm doesnt position 2s root note start on 2nd fret just like position1 therefore calling it an F#?

The issue there are the other notes you're playing. Different positions use different interval patterns so if you play the position 2 there, you'll hit notes that aren't in the F# pentatonic scale. Also you don't always start on the root note.
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Last edited by FacetOfChaos at Aug 25, 2010,
#12
Quote by FacetOfChaos
The issue there are the other notes you're playing. Different positions use different interval patterns so if you play the position 2 there, you'll hit notes that aren't in the F# pentatonic scale. Also you don't always start on the root note.


Ok I read a lesson on hear and it explained very well so basically each position connect to eachother so when i go up the first i start on second and so on. And they are all lets say E depending on what the forst position root note started on.. this is gonna be ALOT of work time to start learning!
#13
Quote by Dig_a_Pony
hmmm doesnt position 2s root note start on 2nd fret just like position1 therefore calling it an F#?
Yes it does start on the same fret, but the 2nd position doesn't start on the root note, it starts on the b3.
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea
#14
Quote by LightxGrenade
What you never heard of the H note?

Err...There are 12 notes, H is the same as B.
#15
Quote by Dig_a_Pony
Ok I read a lesson on hear and it explained very well so basically each position connect to eachother so when i go up the first i start on second and so on. And they are all lets say E depending on what the forst position root note started on.. this is gonna be ALOT of work time to start learning!


A little knowledge is a dangerous thing when you don't have a foundation to support it.

Lets take the E Minor Pentatonic, Root position - first 5 notes.

E G A B D

Lets build the 2nd position now, if you start on G you have:

G A B D E

Notice the same notes are there? Notice any that are not in one that is in the other? See any C#'s? No, thats because its the same 5 notes just started in a physically different place on a different note of the same scale notes.

Best,

Sean
#17
Simply put, scale positions aren't "for" anything - they're just there.

If you're using a set of notes then they appear all over your fretboard, whether you realise that or not. The question really boils down to whether or not your happy with the limited knowledge you currently possess. If the answer is yes then fair enough, if the answer is no and you want to actually start understanding how your instrument and indeed music itself works then it's time to knuckle down and start learning.
Actually called Mark!

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#18
Quote by steven seagull
If the answer is yes then fair enough, if the answer is no and you want to actually start understanding how your instrument and indeed music itself works then it's time to knuckle down and start learning.


I agree with this.

I spent years just 'getting by' with the knowledge I had, as it was enough for what I was doing at the time. Then I took 3 years away from guitar. Not really by choice but that's another story. And no, I didn't go to jail or something, so stop looking at me like that! ^.^ lol

Over the last few weeks I've been studying things that range all over the place. While I don't fully understand ANY of it as much as a professional would, I CAN tell you that what I have learned in particular is minor pentatonic and where it belongs on the fret board in the different keys. Learned it with the help of reading on UG forums, lessons here on UG, and by asking lots of questions.


TLR version: Listen to the people telling you to learn the 5 positions. Pick major or minor if you're going for pentatonica scale, and stick with that and only that scale's patterns till you have it down pat in a specific key. That will enable you to know right away where your positions lie on the board for all other keys with that specific scale!!

I hope this is accurate and somewhat encouraging to you. If not, someone will come and correct me, surely! Of that I have no doubt. Lol