#1
Does anyone have any tips as to how to do so, or even better how to start? I'd definitely like to try considering I've always wanted to listen to a sing, and be able to play along with it right away yknow? I also feel it'll help improve my guitar playing a bit.
#3
just play random notes on the guitar till you match up the pitch with the song.


Yeah, that's the beginners way to do it but if you are familiar enough with your instrument you should be able to recognize familiar keys and pitches and build off from there.
#4
So, your saying I should learn more about keys and what not? I mean I know pitches, but I don't know exactly what notes on in what key and so on.
#5
I consider this a form of applied theory. I figure out songs for myself and friends quite regularly - I can figure them out pretty fast.

I first identify the key then go from there. After a while you'll be able to "hear" what the progression is and just play it. Eventually you should be able to make a chord structure with just the vocal melody, which is extremely helpful when working with a singer who doesn't play an instrument, or writing your own songs.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
Soundcloud
#6
Alot of my friends can do this, and hell a friend of mine took Under the bridge and was able to play it in D standard, almost immediately while hearing it, I mean dont get me wrong I can do the same, but definitely not right after hearing it.

As I asked before, i'm guessing how to detect a key: My primary goal?
#7
Quote by Weaponxclaws
Yeah, that's the beginners way to do it but if you are familiar enough with your instrument you should be able to recognize familiar keys and pitches and build off from there.


Yes. And a beginner should use the "beginners" method.
#8
Quote by SGlover69
As I asked before, i'm guessing how to detect a key: My primary goal?


Well, yes that's a good goal to have. Knowing the key of a song will also allow you to solo over it, if you know it's associated scale.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
Soundcloud
#9
Well, mind you I never said he was a beginner player. I mean I am in no way a beginning player but learning by ear is something I just learned about 2 years ago but now I am a composer so I can tell where notes are going to go even if I have never heard the song. A large majority of songs use familiar progressions and melodic contour rules.
#10
Quote by SGlover69
Does anyone have any tips as to how to do so, or even better how to start? I'd definitely like to try considering I've always wanted to listen to a sing, and be able to play along with it right away yknow? I also feel it'll help improve my guitar playing a bit.


Good luck, and start now. It will most likely take a long time. If you bypass learning and understanding music theory, you will be a functional guitar player that doesn't truly understand the guitar.

Best,

Sean
#11
Quote by SGlover69
Does anyone have any tips as to how to do so, or even better how to start? I'd definitely like to try considering I've always wanted to listen to a sing, and be able to play along with it right away yknow? I also feel it'll help improve my guitar playing a bit.



One word: Experience


start simple.... even just a riff or a lick. Then work into learning entire songs by ear.

btw it WILL help your guitar playing out....... alot.

Ultimately playing music comes down to your ability to hear/listen.


Quote by Sean0913
Good luck, and start now. It will most likely take a long time. If you bypass learning and understanding music theory, you will be a functional guitar player that doesn't truly understand the guitar.

Best,

Sean



Who said anything about bypassing theory?

and assuming a person does just learn by ear..... why derogatory comments towards them?

elitism is so lame.
shred is gaudy music
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Aug 26, 2010,
#12
Quote by GuitarMunky
One word: Experience


start simple.... even just a riff or a lick. Then work into learning entire songs by ear.


Who said anything about bypassing theory?

and assuming a person does just learn by ear..... why derogatory comments towards them?

elitism is so lame.


I agree, elitism is lame, and so are ignorant accusations.

What's derogatory about the comments I made?

Where was the mention or inclusion of understanding theory made clear in the TS question?

Best,

Sean
#13
Quote by Sean0913
I agree, elitism is lame, and so are ignorant accusations.

What's derogatory about the comments I made?

Where was the mention or inclusion of understanding theory made clear in the TS question?

Best,

Sean



Your entire post was derogatory. You didn't even answer his question.

The TS doesn't have to include his intentions on learning theory..... or any other subject. He simply asked about learning music by ear.
shred is gaudy music
#14
Quote by GuitarMunky
Your entire post was derogatory. You didn't even answer his question.

The TS doesn't have to include his intentions on learning theory..... or any other subject. He simply asked about learning music by ear.


I did answer his question. And I stated my opinion, which is also factually correct. If you don't like the truthfulness of it, that's beyond anything I can assist you with.

The fact is, all of the points I said were correct. I interpreted the question as learning to play by ear without understanding of guitar. In the key of A, I can find the C#m a lot faster if I understand the relationship of keys to chords, than if I dink around by ear having no knowledge. Eventually you can get to the same result, but only one will have me understanding the big picture behind what's going on. The other is an abstract place and time conclusion, without ever seeing the big picture.

As a teacher I will always encourage and challenge people on learning theory if they are going to ask questions that really need to, and should have a theoretical background to best answer.

I use my ear constantly, but it came as a byproduct of playing 25 years. I can transcribe as I am sure that you can. But had I only stayed with my ear, I'd still know nothing about the big picture on how everything works. In my opinion, the best proposition is to learn theory, and learn to fish, rather than handing out fish. I will therefore put qualifiers in my statements and answers.

Best,

Sean
#15
Quote by Sean0913
I did answer his question. And I stated my opinion, which is also factually correct. If you don't like the truthfulness of it, that's beyond anything I can assist you with.

The fact is, all of the points I said were correct. I interpreted the question as learning to play by ear without understanding of guitar. In the key of A, I can find the C#m a lot faster if I understand the relationship of keys to chords, than if I dink around by ear having no knowledge. Eventually you can get to the same result, but only one will have me understanding the big picture behind what's going on. The other is an abstract place and time conclusion, without ever seeing the big picture.

As a teacher I will always encourage and challenge people on learning theory if they are going to ask questions that really need to, and should have a theoretical background to best answer.

I use my ear constantly, but it came as a byproduct of playing 25 years. I can transcribe as I am sure that you can. But had I only stayed with my ear, I'd still know nothing about the big picture on how everything works. In my opinion, the best proposition is to learn theory, and learn to fish, rather than handing out fish. I will therefore put qualifiers in my statements and answers.

Best,

Sean


The guy only asked for tips on playing by ear. Not the typical theory VS no theory debate. So why does it always have to end up there?

hint: it doesn't have to if we chose not to take it there.
shred is gaudy music
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Aug 26, 2010,
#16
Quote by GuitarMunky
The guy only asked for tips on playing by ear. Not the typical theory VS no theory debate. So why does it always have to end up there?

hint: it doesn't have to if we chose not to take it there.


There's no debate going on.

Let's do the right thing, and make this the final word on this, out of courtesy to the others here. No matter what, if we proceed further in this topic, it will be in bad taste. Take it up with me in PM or make another topic solely to discuss the points that you have against me.

Best,

Sean
#17
Quote by Sean0913
There's no debate going on.

Let's do the right thing, and make this the final word on this, out of courtesy to the others here. No matter what, if we proceed further in this topic, it will be in bad taste. Take it up with me in PM or make another topic solely to discuss the points that you have against me.

Best,

Sean



Okay man, good idea, lets not get into theory VS no theory debate. lets not say another word about it.
shred is gaudy music
#19
I read an interesting book a couple of weeks back called 'How Popular Musicians Learn'. One of the interesting findings of that study was that whilst 'popular' musicians mostly start off playing by ear, most realise at a later date the importance of theory and technique and have much 'catch up' work to do.

Interestingly the study also concluded that 'classical' musicians worked on technique and theory to the exclusion of aural work and had to do their remedial work on ears at a later date.

Anyhow, ears, theory, technique, etc You'll need them all at some stage if you want to become a competent musician. It's a question of choice as to when you develop them.
#20
Here's what you do
Fill up your ipod with all your favorite songs (you probably already did this)
Or if you have no ipod, take all your favorite CDs or vinyls or whatever.
Then get a device that can play them loudly to the point where your amplifier and the music is at roughly similar volumes.
Then you press play on whatever song you want to learn and try to find the root note of the song. Then try to listen to the bass for the motion of the chords. (i.e. the notes the bass plays usually tend to be the root of the chords that are going on)
Try to determine if the chords are minor or major.
Try to play the whole song's chords.
Try to play the main riffs of the song.
Try to play the solos, or try to find out which scales they use so you can play a solo of your own.
Just continue listening to yourself and the songs you want to play side-by-side until you have it.
You will hopefully repeat the song many times in a row until you get it perfected.
do that with every song you want to play.
#21
Just listen to the song and play the same notes... your not gona be able to play it the same straight away... but the more you learn the quicker it comes. Ull soon find your familar with hearing an E or a D or something... so ull know where to go. Also knowing your scales helps big time if your learning a little harmonie or lick or something because you can find it all in those scales, it doesnt matter if you play it in the exsact posistion the orginal person or your friend plays it, as long as its the right octave and sounds good.
Marshall Vintage Modern 2466 and Gibson Les Paul Custom is litteraly sex in my ear!!!

"THESE AMPS GO TO 11!!!!!!!!!!"