#1
Hey, so I've been making a lot of progress soloing with the major scale recently and I wanna try expanding my vocabulary. For the benefit of my own learning, I decided to try and figure out what a minor scale would look like on my guitar based on which intervals I'd be using and I noticed the Aeolian position resembled it perfectly. Does this mean that if I want to play in Am, I simply play the Aeolian shape at the 5th fret move everything else accordingly (i.e. Ionian at 8th, Dorian at 10th, etc.)? Thanks!!
#2
Yes, the A Aeolian is the same as the A minor in the same way that the Ionian is the same as the major. Now, I don't learn scales in "shapes" so I can't help you with your fifth question, but it would just be all the natural notes from A to A (as you probably already know).
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#3
Quote by CPDmusic
Yes, the A Aeolian is the same as the A minor in the same way that the Ionian is the same as the major. Now, I don't learn scales in "shapes" so I can't help you with your fifth question, but it would just be all the natural notes from A to A (as you probably already know).


Awesome, thanks man!
#4
The Minor scale (Aeolian) starts on the 6th degree of the Major scale just like the Dorian scale starts on the 2nd degree of the Major scale and so on. This is known as the inversions of the scales.

Now the A may be found on the 6th string 5th fret but you can use any As on the fretboard to start your scale. It's the intervals that determines the scales.
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#5
So kind of on a different topic, but still related, I am looking for ways to improve my soloing versatility. I can think of all sorts of cool things I want to come out of my guitar, but when I actually sit down I either forget them or I simply can't do it, and I feel like I rarely am able to incorporate my coolest ideas into my every day soloing. Right now I am working at memorizing the notes on the fretboard and I think this will help, but I wanted to ask -- is there anything I can do to start making more memorable solos besides raw practice time?

I know the major and minor scale shapes all the way up the fretboard pretty well, I can move that shape around to different keys with some competence, I can string skip mid-solo and make it sound good occasionally, and I am constantly trying to figure out the coolest ways to put notes together, whether it be the sounds, the phrasing... everything. I know where most of the blues notes are and I use them, as well as little chromatic runs, whenever I can. I want to play rock a la Allman Brothers, Led Zeppelin, or the Grateful Dead, and I know I'm not and never will be a Duane Allman, but I do want to be able to rip a badass solo at will. Any suggestions for getting my solos a little spicier? Thanks again!
#6
You say you know your scales up and down but what about the notes not on the scales?

Food for thought mate.
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#7
Agree with OldRocker. A cool way to break things up and have some fun... First, record a progression that you like and loop it so you can play over it. Now, choose one string (let's say B string for example).

Improv over your track using ONLY that string. Forget scales and fret positions, in fact don't even look down - just play and listen. Make some noise for the pleasure of it.

Follow your instincts and surprise yourself by what you can create. Land on something cool and run with it.
variations...
- use only 2 fingers, 1 finger etc.
- play only bent notes
- play only release bent notes
- use all vibrato or no vibrato at all.
- use your imagination to come up with more challenges.

This might seem ass-backwards until you try it. It's merely a step away from all the stuff you think you supposed to be doing, leaving you with complete freedom of musical expression. (and that feels good)

Remember it's only an exercise - you won't forget your scales.
And you might even pick up some new tricks to bring back into your regular playing.
Hope it helps.
#8
Quote by cringer
Agree with OldRocker. A cool way to break things up and have some fun... First, record a progression that you like and loop it so you can play over it. Now, choose one string (let's say B string for example).

Improv over your track using ONLY that string. Forget scales and fret positions, in fact don't even look down - just play and listen. Make some noise for the pleasure of it.

Follow your instincts and surprise yourself by what you can create. Land on something cool and run with it.
variations...
- use only 2 fingers, 1 finger etc.
- play only bent notes
- play only release bent notes
- use all vibrato or no vibrato at all.
- use your imagination to come up with more challenges.

This might seem ass-backwards until you try it. It's merely a step away from all the stuff you think you supposed to be doing, leaving you with complete freedom of musical expression. (and that feels good)

Remember it's only an exercise - you won't forget your scales.
And you might even pick up some new tricks to bring back into your regular playing.
Hope it helps.


Really liking this idea, and I never thought to record my own progressions.. good stuff man, thank you very much. I actually noticed today when I tried coming up with licks using only a few notes, instead of trying to make them incorporate as much as possible, I could often make things sound much cooler. This sounds like a perfect extension of that. And I'll try and work in a couple of off-scale notes as well haha, should be fun.
#9
Work with the intervals going up and down and you'll see why scales keep you in the rut.

For example, going up your fingers go 1 3 4, going down 4 2 1. Same intervals in both directions. Get it?
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#10
Quote by OldRocker
Work with the intervals going up and down and you'll see why scales keep you in the rut.

For example, going up your fingers go 1 3 4, going down 4 2 1. Same intervals in both directions. Get it?


Yeah I've tried doing scale pattern training, like 1-3-2-4-3-5-4-6-etc, or 1-2-3-2-3-4-etc, but I feel like maybe I don't incorporate it enough? And I should probably try some other less patterned intervals too. Really liking all this advice, just playing around with it a little differently for a half hour yesterday before bed got me some really cool new riffs, so THANK YOU!
#11
Quote by pbskl
I actually noticed today when I tried coming up with licks using only a few notes, instead of trying to make them incorporate as much as possible, I could often make things sound much cooler. This sounds like a perfect extension of that. And I'll try and work in a couple of off-scale notes as well haha, should be fun.

Sweet, you got the idea. Keep doing this type of free-style. Make up your own. Let your music come out.

Some people can whip around on scales, but never bother to develop their own sense of creativity (on a very elementary level) as it relates to the guitar. It's too bad.

Learning "rules" is very important yes. But to really play you have to know how to bend and break rules at any time. That's where your own creativity (combined with experience) finally shines through. So why not practice being creative as much as technique and theory?

Ever notice that some of the most commonly mentioned guitar idols were definitely not recognized for their "technical" prowess ? But they sure made a lasting impression didn't they?