#1
I have had my LP Studio for a while now, and it has always had this harsh, icepick tone to it. I have been playing an SG lately and do not have that problem, despite it being a "brighter" instrument. I was thinking of changing the pickups, but not if it still retains the harshness.
#2
Quote by patriotplayer90
I have had my LP Studio for a while now, and it has always had this harsh, icepick tone to it. I have been playing an SG lately and do not have that problem, despite it being a "brighter" instrument. I was thinking of changing the pickups, but not if it still retains the harshness.

What LP studio are you talking about? Gibson? Epiphone? Normally an SG should be harsher than a LP. So yeah, probably there's something worng with the pickups (maybe a broken coil) or the wiring. You can also roll off the tone knob a bit.
What amp do you use, and what settings you dial in?
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#4
Maybe the electronics are screwed up or something... what LP is it?

Some LPs do you have a pronounced high-end, it's just what happens when you combine a maple-cap with the wrong pickups. But with stock electronics, that shouldn't be the case.
#6
Quote by ChucklesMginty
If anything they're meant to be the opposite. A good LP has kind of a mid-range honk and thick bass (due to the thick mahogany body and scale length.)

Pretty much what I was thinking. LP's do have kind of a strange icepicky clean sound with the bridge pickup though.
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Quote by Anonden
You CAN play anything with anything....but some guitars sound right for some things, and not for others. Single coils sound retarded for metal, though those who are apeshit about harpsichord probably beg to differ.
#7
I own both a studio and I recently just got an SG. Their both different in their own right, but what you describe is odd.
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#8
pick further forward. if you rake the strings at the bridge its a trebly mess.
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#9
raise your pickups
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#10
Quote by LP_CL
What LP studio are you talking about? Gibson? Epiphone? Normally an SG should be harsher than a LP. So yeah, probably there's something worng with the pickups (maybe a broken coil) or the wiring. You can also roll off the tone knob a bit.
What amp do you use, and what settings you dial in?


It has been through a number of amps where I experience this problem. I normally have to turn down the presence and treble on the amp which makes it more bearable, but clarity is lost and you can still hear the harshness.

It is a Gibson LP Studio, the SG isn't harsh at all.

How do I raise the pickups?
#11
Quote by patriotplayer90
It has been through a number of amps where I experience this problem. I normally have to turn down the presence and treble on the amp which makes it more bearable, but clarity is lost and you can still hear the harshness.

It is a Gibson LP Studio, the SG isn't harsh at all.

How do I raise the pickups?



Two screws on either side of the pickup brackets adjust the height, one for the right side, one for the left. Ideally you raise passives as high as you can BEFORE you get annoying hum to increase output.
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#12
Quote by Mitochondria9
Two screws on either side of the pickup brackets adjust the height, one for the right side, one for the left. Ideally you raise passives as high as you can BEFORE you get annoying hum to increase output.


Thanks, and that makes it less treble-y? I hear raising the pickups can increase harshness, while lowering them mellows them out
#13
Quote by patriotplayer90
Thanks, and that makes it less treble-y? I hear raising the pickups can increase harshness, while lowering them mellows them out



Raising the pickup height increases output and can clean up a tone a bit. It'll make them louder, but can cause excess noise and muddyness if you raise them too high.

The key is to raise them high enough to achieve the output you want, but not so high that they make too much noise.
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#14
Quote by GreenDay0013
raise your pickups

i dunno about that - raising the pickups too far makes the low strings boomy and the high strings even more ice-picky. if anything he probably needs to lower them on the treble side a little.

also, despite the common misconception, SGs are actually usually darker sounding than les pauls - people seem to judge brightness based on the bass frequencies for some reason when it comes to guitars, which les pauls have a lot of, but they also have a whole load of treble too, especially with the bridge pickup (maple top emphasises this - although i think the studios are all mahogany- i know mine is), whereas SGs have a tighter but less obvious bass output, and pronounced fundamental frequencies giving the notes a lot of definition, but there's really not a lot of treble in the sound normally.

basically les pauls just have a broader range of frequencies and probably will sound harsher than SGs sometimes.
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#15
Raising the pickups did wonders. Thanks alot guys. It still sounds treble-y, but not harsh and now it has the b*lls to back it up. Sweet, what I always wanted the guitar to sound like!