#1
I Would Reallly like Some Tips on How To make Some Hard Rock/Stoner Rock Riffs. My Guitar is Tuned in C Standard and my High With Distortion. My Biggest Influence is Josh homme of Kyuss/QOTSA/TCV/ You all kknow know him. But anyway Id like to know some tips if ya got em. So please Help out A Fellow Musician?
#2
Quote by oWhoadYo
I Would Reallly like Some Tips on How To make Some Hard Rock/Stoner Rock Riffs. My Guitar is Tuned in C Standard and my High With Distortion. My Biggest Influence is Josh homme of Kyuss/QOTSA/TCV/ You all kknow know him. But anyway Id like to know some tips if ya got em. So please Help out A Fellow Musician?



Spend some time in "learn mode" before moving on to "write mode".

Learn, memorize, play and enjoy your favorite music..... get experience.
shred is gaudy music
#4
Generally for me, I'll write riffs in two ways (in relation to a song).

1. Write a riff on a chord progression.
Steps:
1. Identify key
2. Identify associated scale
3. Write melody using associated scale to key (and emphasise chord tones at some point)

2. Write a riff and write a chord progression after.
Steps:
1. Write something cool by playing around
2. Identify scale
3. Identify key
4. Create chord structure around riff, using notes as reference point for possibly emphasising the chords underneath it.

For both, knowledge of scales and keys are extremely helpful. Otherwise you could spend much longer through guessing/trial and error.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
Soundcloud
#5
Quote by GuitarMunky
Learn, memorize, play and enjoy your favorite music

This doesn't necessarily help you with writing music if you don't have a general idea of what's going on in the musician's head. In fact, learning to compose like this can only lead to becoming an imitator rather than an innovator.

I'll suggest similar advice: Learn theory, study your favourite songs, pick out the techniques the musicians are using, understand and modify those techniques for your own purposes.

For some more specific help on writing riffs: Imply chords and harmonies, keep it rhythmically interesting (IE, a variety of rhythmic beats, rather than bars upon bars of quarter notes), make it sound harmonically "right" with the rest of your song (if you can).
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#6
Quote by demonofthenight
This doesn't necessarily help you with writing music if you don't have a general idea of what's going on in the musician's head.


It definitely does. and honestly it's essential.

Quote by demonofthenight

In fact, learning to compose like this can only lead to becoming an imitator rather than an innovator.


no, thats not true at all.

Quote by demonofthenight

I'll suggest similar advice: Learn theory, study your favourite songs, pick out the techniques the musicians are using, understand and modify those techniques for your own purposes.

For some more specific help on writing riffs: Imply chords and harmonies, keep it rhythmically interesting (IE, a variety of rhythmic beats, rather than bars upon bars of quarter notes), make it sound harmonically "right" with the rest of your song (if you can).


When you learn theoretical concepts, you're still learning from someone else, you're still imitating.

Getting experience with music by playing music on your instrument will definitely help your ability to write. It gives the context for those fancy words, and without it, they are meaningless.

I think it's great that people have left some theoretical perscriptions as advice. that is helpful. But if you think you're above good ol' fashioned listening, I'd say you you're missing a vital part of being a musician.
shred is gaudy music
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Aug 27, 2010,
#7
Quote by GuitarMunky
When you learn theoretical concepts, you're still learning from someone else, you're still imitating.

Perhaps, but not to the same extent. No one has ever written perfectly original music and no one ever will. What you can do is actually understand music, as in through theory, and use your knowledge to sculpt something relatively new and interesting. If you understand something, you have power over it, this especially applies to music.
Quote by GuitarMunky
Getting experience with music by playing music on your instrument will definitely help your ability to write.
Composing music transcends instruments. The best composers didn't even write for their own instruments and this is true even today. In fact, you don't even need to be good at any instrument to be a brilliant composer.
Quote by GuitarMunky
I think it's great that people have left some theoretical perscriptions as advice.
Theory is essential for learning how to compose, it's a harsh truth. Even if all you know are a few chord shapes, that's still a knowledge of theory. The more music theory you know, the more you can use and obviously the more power you have.
Quote by GuitarMunky
But if you think you're above good ol' fashioned listening
No one here has said that and no experienced musician will ever say that.

Do you understand what a straw man is?
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[U]       /|_     `-’       |      [/U]
[U]      //| \      |       |      [/U]
[U]     | \|_ |     |     .-|      [/U]
      *-|-*    (_)     `-’
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        L.