#1
ok. i am a beginner and i have a lot of doubt in the pentatonic scales.I read about the hopscotch method. Its just 5 shapes.

Ok pentatonic means 5 tones, or 5 notes. so it can be anything depending according to the root??
Give examples

and coming to the hop scotch method, while your playing the 1st shape or box which is

|o|-|-|o|
|o|-|-|o|
|o|-|o|-|
|o|-|o|-|
|o|-|o|-|
|o|-|-|o|
incase i play it on the 3rd fret, and then its G pentatonic. if i move it to the 5th fret does it bcum A pentatonic/
and i dont get the major and minor pentatonic concepts.

ok so i play the next shape or box at the 5th fret, thn what scale is that? A pentatonic? then what if i transpose 1st shape to 5th fret? please explain in detail!

Let this be a very good solution for me and all the pple wo struggle in understanding pentatonic scale

thanku
#3
Could you maybe clear up your questions slightly, since I'm not entirely sure what you're asking?

Are you asking if the shape can be moved to different keys? If so, then yes, simply move the root note (along with the rest of the shape)
#4
I believe that's a minor pentatonic shape, so if that first note's your root on the 6th string on the 5th fret it's A minor pentatonic. Major, in your diagram type would be:

|-|R|-|o|
|-|o|-|o|
|o|-|o|-|
|o|-|-|R|
|o|-|-|o|
|-|R|-|o|

BTW, R is root.
#7
Leather Sleeves, you're only helping to confuse the matter further

The way the pentatonic scale works is that it applies all over the fretboard but we break it up into different shapes to make it easier to learn. In the same way a chord can still be the same chord when played in a different way on a different part of the fretboard, so can a scale.

TS, the shape you posted is the first shape of the pentatonic scale. But from there we have 4 more different pentatonic shapes until we reach the octave and start over. That's where Leather Sleeves' shape comes in, as it is the second shape in the pentatonic scale. You'll find all of your shapes here http://www.guitarconsultant.com/pentatonic.html

The reason that Leather Sleeves was correct when he said the shape he gave was the major pentatonic for that position, is that it is...just the second shape. When switching from minor to major pentatonic, effectively what happens is we move all the shapes back four frets (including the starting note).

That means that if you're playing the A minor pentatonic (below)

-------------------------------5--8---------------
-------------------------5--8---------------------
-------------------5--7---------------------------
-------------5--7---------------------------------
-------5--7---------------------------------------
-5--8---------------------------------------------

you move the shape back to that given below (while the root note stays in the same place it was before)

-------------------------------2--5---------------
-------------------------2--5---------------------
-------------------2--4---------------------------
-------------2--4---------------------------------
-------2--4---------------------------------------
-2--5---------------------------------------------
#8
Quote by Leather Sleeves
Actually, and I hate to keep posting here, there are other pentatonic modes. But major and minor are bread and butter for beginners.
No there aren't. The major/minor pentatonic scales are derived from the major and minor scales from which you can derive modes, but you can't derive modes from the pentatonics.
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea
Last edited by food1010 at Aug 27, 2010,
#9
First position played on the third fret would be G. Second position played in the next spot would be a continuation of that same scale.
Second position played on G as well would be a different pentatonic scale.

It's all about the intervals being played. Intervals make up scales.

A major scale is made from this pattern:
Whole step, whole step, half step, whole step, whole step, whole step, half step.

If I play that pattern from the third fret, I'd have a G major scale. That has the notes:
G A B C D E F (G)

If I play a different pattern starting on the third fret, I will no longer have the same scale. For example if I played this:
W, H, W, W, H, W, W (W = whole step, H = half step) starting on the third fret, I'd have a G minor scale.

If I played the second position of the G major scale starting on the fifth fret, I'd still be playing a G major scale, just starting on a note besides G (in this case A).

A scale isn't defined by what note you start on, it's defined by where it resolves (sounds complete or finished).
Quote by DiminishedFifth
Who's going to stop you? The music police?
#10
Quote by Leather Sleeves
But major and minor are bread and butter for beginners.


If this means that minor and major are scales that only beginners use, that's not right mate.

Most, if not all guitarists use them on a regular basis, including your heros.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
Soundcloud
#11
FacetOfChaos, I'm pretty sure TS is asking about the difference between major and minor PENTATONIC. Hence the name of the thread

AlanHB, "Bread and butter" is a phrase used to describe things that are done often and/or well by someone. I.e. "Freekicks are bread and butter to David Beckham". Leather Sleeves' usage wasn't really correct. <3
#12
thank u guy! but my question is simple. ok here..

i play the first position on the third fret to get a G pentatonic? what if i play the same position on the 5th fret? it A pentatonic??

If thats A pentatonic, then the next shape or box which starts from 5th fret.. what scale will that be??

and pentatonic means 5 notes. gime the formula for that. lik ex: WWHWWW for maj scales.

Explain me the difference bw maj and minor pentatonic and hw it works.
#13
Quote by piop

AlanHB, "Bread and butter" is a phrase used to describe things that are done often and/or well by someone. I.e. "Freekicks are bread and butter to David Beckham". Leather Sleeves' usage wasn't really correct. <3


Thanks for the point, but I was more interested in whether Leather Sleaves was equating major/minor scales with beginner scales.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
Soundcloud
#14
Quote by piop
FacetOfChaos, I'm pretty sure TS is asking about the difference between major and minor PENTATONIC. Hence the name of the thread


Just using the major scale as an example to answer the question about positions

Quote by guitar.pick
thank u guy! but my question is simple. ok here..

i play the first position on the third fret to get a G pentatonic? what if i play the same position on the 5th fret? it A pentatonic??

If thats A pentatonic, then the next shape or box which starts from 5th fret.. what scale will that be??

and pentatonic means 5 notes. gime the formula for that. lik ex: WWHWWW for maj scales.

Explain me the difference bw maj and minor pentatonic and hw it works.


Yes. First position played on the fifth fret would be an A pentatonic.

Lets see. Major pentatonic is 1 2 3 5 6. Minor looks like it's 1 b3 4 5 b7.
So that would be... in W/H format:
Major = W W (H+W) W (W+H)
Minor = (W+H) W W (W+H) W

Pentatonic scales get rid of certain tones that can create a lot of dissonance. In blues you'll often hear a minor pentatonic over a major progression or vice versa.
Major pentatonic has characteristics and sound of a major scale. Minor is the same but for minor. I don't know all that much about pentatonics so I'll leave it to those with more experience/knowledge.
Quote by DiminishedFifth
Who's going to stop you? The music police?
#15
faceofchoas :i get it nw... ok so basically for G major pentatonic its G A B C# D# F ?? i m jus making sure.

cool the 1st position played on a 5th fret E string would be a A pentatonic? u mean A maj?? ok.

Then the second position that we usually play on the 5th fret, or the second BOX. what if we play it on the 5th fret? it becomes A minor? or if we play it on G tats 3rd fret it bcumz G minor?

need a lot of patience to reply
#16
Quote by piop
FacetOfChaos, I'm pretty sure TS is asking about the difference between major and minor PENTATONIC. Hence the name of the thread

AlanHB, "Bread and butter" is a phrase used to describe things that are done often and/or well by someone. I.e. "Freekicks are bread and butter to David Beckham". Leather Sleeves' usage wasn't really correct. <3



Wait that's not entirely right either. It's more like, the basic fundamentals. Like bread and butter being the most basic meal you can have. It sort implies that if it's basics for someone they are good at it though.

As for AlanHB I think he meant it's a good place for beginners to start, and not that these scales are exclusive to beginners.
Don't tell me what can not be done

Don't tell me what can be done, either.



I love you all no matter what.
#17
Quote by guitar.pick
faceofchoas :i get it nw... ok so basically for G major pentatonic its G A B C# D# F ?? i m jus making sure.



This isn't right...
Don't tell me what can not be done

Don't tell me what can be done, either.



I love you all no matter what.
#18
Quote by nightwind
This isn't right...
+1. "Pentatonic" literally means "five notes." You have six. G major pentatonic is G A B D E

Your intervals are 1 2 3 5 6. On G you have: 1 = 6. 2 = A. 3 = B. There's no 4, so you shouldn't have any type of C note. 5 = D. 6 = E.
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea