#1
I have a Yamaha F-310. Not a bad sounding guitar, for what I payed. It was my first, so I cherish it.

I've noticed for a while that there's some buzzing, particularly when power chords are played. It's annoying as all hell. Also, the B string touches directly on the metal between the first and second fret, to the point where there is an indention.

I've never had repairs, but I've taken care of it as well as I could. I've used light gauge strings up until recently. Now I use medium gauge for a change of pace.

I'm probably getting a new guitar soon anyways. But still, should I be taking measures to protect my baby, such as truss rod adjustment?

Oh, her name is Serena.
#2
hi, Serena's person.

do you use a hygrometer ? this sounds like a humidity issue.
Last edited by patticake at Aug 27, 2010,
#3
I've never used one before. I live in a very humid place though. That would make sense.
What would I need to do to fix the issue?
#4
you may need either drying packs for inside your guitar case, gigbag or closet or you could get a dehumidifier or use the A/C to dry the air.

it's very important to know the humidity your guitar is stored at. that way, you'll know when you've got the humidity tweaked right, or might even discover it's not as humid as you thought. while changing strings from light to medium might require a slight truss rod adjustment, it shouldn't be as bad as it sounds like, which is why i think it's humidity related.
#5
I'd have the instrument looked at by a qualified technician before I started trying to control humidity.
String "buzz" is caused by the vibrating string touching (just barely) a fret somewhere between the fretted note and the saddle.
This can be caused by a number of things, including a "lifted" fret. Normally, with age, you'd expect any neck movement to increase relief, not decrease it.

The action may simply be set too low. It may be that your change to medium-gauge strings results in a greater amplitude of vibration... Resulting in buzzing.
#6
I'll certainly get it looked at. I have a shop I can take it too.
I don't feel neither experienced or knowledgeable enough to start tweaking things on my own, especially if it needs a truss rod adjustment, which I've suspected for a while now.
Thanks for the help! My baby thanks you as well.
#7
Truss rod adjustments aren't hard. Just turn it a 1/4th rotation at a time. Play it. Retune strings if necessary and see how it plays.

I had incredible buzzing when I restrung my guitar for the firs time in ten months. A whole half turn and she was back to normal.

All you need is an Allan wrench. It'll change the hight of your strings a little bit since your neck is probably bowed backwards too much.
#8
Quote by brokenhymen
I have a Yamaha F-310. Not a bad sounding guitar, for what I payed. It was my first, so I cherish it.

I've noticed for a while that there's some buzzing, particularly when power chords are played. It's annoying as all hell. Also, the B string touches directly on the metal between the first and second fret, to the point where there is an indention.

I've never had repairs, but I've taken care of it as well as I could. I've used light gauge strings up until recently. Now I use medium gauge for a change of pace.

I'm probably getting a new guitar soon anyways. But still, should I be taking measures to protect my baby, such as truss rod adjustment?

Oh, her name is Serena.


Ok, for starters, learning time. The metal you're referring to that the B string is touching IS the fret. The wood spaces between those are simply the fretboard. Got that so far? When you play it, you press the string down until it just touches the METAL FRET, maybe a little more. The indentation is from years of playing and having the string wear a dent into the metal of the fret. Quite common. Also fixable by having the frets leveled and crowned and polished(is a fantastic way to get a new feeling guitar back by the way, they're so smooth after this is done). Now, the change from lights to mediums has undoubtedly caused your neck to change a bit and now you're getting fret buzz. Either go back to lights or have a proper setup done to the guitar if you plan on keeping the mediums on. Not every guitar is meant to handle the higher tension of those strings, at least not without a couple of adjustments.
#9
Lots of people immediately want folks with such problems to start tampering with the truss rod.
The truss rod is there for a purpose, that is to establish and hold neck relief. It is not intended for action adjustments or the correction of undiagnosed problems.
#10
Like I said, I'm taking it to someone local so I can watch them explain it to me, rather than read it over the internet and try to do it on my own. That'd just be silly since it's difficult for anyone to be positive of what problems the guitar may have without it being in front of them. It's the only guitar I have right now, so I'm not leaving anything to chance.
#11
That would be a good idea to take it somewhere if you don't know what your doing. They shouldn't charge you anything to look at it and see whats wrong.
***Guitars***
Epiphone Les Paul Custom AP (w/ 2 Seymour Duncans)
Jackson Dx10D Dinky (w/ DiMarzio PAF Bridge)
Epihpone Hummingbird

***Amps***
Marshall JCM 2000 DSL 100 (Voodoo Modified)
Custom 4x12 Halfstack (w/ Veteran 30's)