#1
I've been playing since a little before my join date so 2 yrs now, and I have yet to learn real guitar lessons with all that mumbo jumbo scale stuff. I mean I want to learn it but it's sooooo confusing, there are too many majors and minors, and you gotta remember are the finger patterns and stuff. It just seems too complicated for my little brain. I just make up stuff and some of it sounds good, but I know I could be better if I took the time to learn the right stuff.

Is there anyone else besides me, who is self taught and hasn't learned scales, and majors/minors and all that? meaning you just make up shit and play.

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Last edited by Who Sh0t Ya HxO at Aug 27, 2010,
#2
I was self taught for the first three years that I played. When I first started to learn some actual theory it seemed way too involved and I struggled with it. Now that I understand most of the simple concepts, such as the difference between major and minor tonalities, it all comes very easy.

I have taught a couple of my friends how to play, the right way. What I found with teaching them is that people tend to over think things. For example the major scale is simply whole, whole, half, whole, whole, whole, half; when thinking steps wise. When I look at it I see numbers. 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8. Basically, if you can count to 8 you can understand scales.

The key of C major is the easiest to learn on paper, because it has no sharps or flats. So it is just C, D, E, F, G, A, B, C. Count it, there are 8 notes that I just wrote for C major. Minor is literally just major with a flat third. So in the key of C minor, you would play C, D, Eb, F, G, A, B, C.

That is the best way I can explain it with as little detail as possible. Basically, it is a lot easier than people expect and that is why people have trouble with it.
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Last edited by m3tal_R3dn3ck at Aug 27, 2010,
#3
Quote by Who Sh0t Ya HxO

Is there anyone else besides me, who is self taught and hasn't learned scales, and majors/minors and all that? meaning you just make up shit and play.


You can do this, my best friend doesn't know any theory but it makes it very difficult when playing with other musicians. Whenever he comes up with a riff or a chord progression and I ask him what it is he is playing, so that I can work out a bass line for it he always gives really vague answers like "I dunno... like 7th fret and then 5th fret".

Basically scales and theory in general will help you to write songs as well as communicate to other musicians about songs.

The best advice I can give you is to take it at a pace comfortable for you, and use a resource like a website or a book. There are plenty good ones out there, you will be spoiled for choice.
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#4
Quote by Who Sh0t Ya HxO
I've been playing since a little before my join date so 2 yrs now, and I have yet to learn real guitar lessons with all that mumbo jumbo scale stuff. I mean I want to learn it but it's sooooo confusing, there are too many majors and minors, and you gotta remember are the finger patterns and stuff. It just seems too complicated for my little brain. I just make up stuff and some of it sounds good, but I know I could be better if I took the time to learn the right stuff.

Is there anyone else besides me, who is self taught and hasn't learned scales, and majors/minors and all that? meaning you just make up shit and play.

Inb4coolstorybro, brool story co, all memes, jokes etc.


It can be very confusing, I know, I've been there before. So, what do you see for the future of your development on guitar?

Sean
#5
Quote by m3tal_R3dn3ck
The key of C major is the easiest to learn on paper, because it has no sharps or flats. So it is just C, D, E, F, G, A, B, C. Count it, there are 8 notes that I just wrote for C major. Minor is literally just major with a flat third. So in the key of C minor, you would play C, D, Eb, F, G, A, B, C.

That would be a better description for a C minor triad (1 b3 5). A natural minor scale has a b3, b6 and b7 so C minor would actually be C D Eb F G Ab Bb C
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#6
Quote by Who Sh0t Ya HxO
there are too many majors and minors, and you gotta remember are the finger patterns and stuff.

There's 2, one for major, one for minor. Other than that it's just moving around.

www.musictheory.net is good for starters
#7
Quote by pwrmax
There's 2, one for major, one for minor. Other than that it's just moving around.
This. The major scale is the major scale, whether it's rooted on C or on Dxx.

TS, I suggest you learn about intervals and how to apply them in order to construct scales. I think you're making things a bit too complicated. If you understand intervals, all you need to know about the major scale is that it contains 1 2 3 4 5 6 7. Simple as that.

If you have a look through this article and begin to understand how all this interval stuff works, you should have no problem with scales.
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