#1
Just a quick question,

I was jamming with a friend and I played a riff that I wrote in the key of D major,
and told him that it was in D major (as a reference). He had a pained look on his face, and played a few notes and told he confidently that it wasn't in D major, but some other major key. (like A major or something, I forget) I told him that with a simple riff like that, it could be interpreted multiple ways, and that I wrote it for a song in D major, but he was sure that you couldn't interpret it different ways, and his arguement was that he was in orchestra for 2 years. So, UG, can most riffs and things like that be interpreted in more than one key or not?
#2
Quote by MagicsDevil
Just a quick question,

I was jamming with a friend and I played a riff that I wrote in the key of D major,
and told him that it was in D major (as a reference). He had a pained look on his face, and played a few notes and told he confidently that it wasn't in D major, but some other major key. (like A major or something, I forget) I told him that with a simple riff like that, it could be interpreted multiple ways, and that I wrote it for a song in D major, but he was sure that you couldn't interpret it different ways, and his arguement was that he was in orchestra for 2 years. So, UG, can most riffs and things like that be interpreted in more than one key or not?



Not enough information to answer. Of course riffs can be seen for different keys, but where and what note did it want to strongly resolve to? Because then it doesnt matter what you wrote it to be, what it feels resolved to is what it is.

Sean
#3
Quote by MagicsDevil
Just a quick question,

I was jamming with a friend and I played a riff that I wrote in the key of D major,
and told him that it was in D major (as a reference). He had a pained look on his face, and played a few notes and told he confidently that it wasn't in D major, but some other major key. (like A major or something, I forget) I told him that with a simple riff like that, it could be interpreted multiple ways, and that I wrote it for a song in D major, but he was sure that you couldn't interpret it different ways, and his arguement was that he was in orchestra for 2 years. So, UG, can most riffs and things like that be interpreted in more than one key or not?


What is the riff?
shred is gaudy music
#4
Quote by MagicsDevil
(...) I wrote in the key of D major (...) some other major key. (like A major (...)
If you never use a G or a G# in your riff, then at first sight it could be both in D major and A major. But if at some point you have an A chord resolving into a D chord, you're in D major.

If however you have an E-chord (containing a G# as the 3th) resolve to an A chord, he's right and your riff is in A major.

Since it's a riff, the chords are more likely masked as arpeggio's, but the principle remains.

Without seeing the actual riff, my money's on the D major, because the G# is too important to establish the dominant in A major. You could also have a riff that modulates between D major and A major, but you would probably hear both the G and G# at some point.
#5
well things can work in different keys but usually they're more based in 1 key than another. for example, if a riff is B, D, C, (which, just by looking at it, i will assume sounds retarded), its notes fit into both the key of Cmajor and Gmajor, but more C than G because it resolves to C. this might be a horrible example cuz i came up with it off the top of my head, but you should get the point
#6
Quote by TMVATDI
well things can work in different keys but usually they're more based in 1 key than another. for example, if a riff is B, D, C, (which, just by looking at it, i will assume sounds retarded), its notes fit into both the key of Cmajor and Gmajor, but more C than G because it resolves to C. this might be a horrible example cuz i came up with it off the top of my head, but you should get the point

Are you sure that resolves to C? G sounds far better.

But TS needs to post his riff if he wants help.
#8
Hmm it was a general question (about music in general) but the riff is

|-------------------------------------------------------------------|
|-------------------------------------------------------------------|
|------9-----9---9-----9-----9---9-----11----11--11-----------------|
|------7-----7---7-----7-----7---7-----9-----9---9-----11----11--11-|
|--0-0-0-0-0-0-0-0-5-5-5-5-5-5-5-5-7-7-7-7-7-7-7-7-----9-----9---9--|
|--------------------------------------------------7-7-7-7-7-7-7-7--|


and then a repeating A5, Dsus2

EDIT: I realise that it sounds like A Major, but I wrote it as a small part of a song that was D major
Last edited by MagicsDevil at Aug 29, 2010,
#9
In standard tuning?

A5, Dsus2, Esus2, Bsus2? (I think).

I'd guess that your key is either A major or A minor.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
Soundcloud
#10
Quote by MousseMoose
Are you sure that resolves to C? G sounds far better.

But TS needs to post his riff if he wants help.


That's a pretty clear example of an implied perfect cadence in C major. It could also be a perfect cadence in A minor, but B C and D are in the C major/A minor scale aswell as G major and E minor melodic descending. Most melodic fragments can be harmonised in a variety of keys.

And OP, I think that riff is in D major. Don't really see any reason for it to be A major: the A5 - Dsus2 at the end is as close to a perfect cadence as anything in that riff, and there's no G# or dominant/tonic movement around A to suggest any "A-ness". ( )
And I've played in an orchestra longer than your friend
Last edited by National_Anthem at Aug 29, 2010,
#11
^ Yeah, except for the way it sounds. It is most certainly in A Major. I was just pulling your leg with the crystal ball thing MagicsDevil. To answer your general question, no, things are in one key and one key only.
i don't know why i feel so dry
#12
Quote by Eastwinn
^ Yeah, except for the way it sounds. It is most certainly in A Major. I was just pulling your leg with the crystal ball thing MagicsDevil. To answer your general question, no, things are in one key and one key only.
/thread.
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea