#1
Hey,
Basically I wrote a song the other day, but I don't have much theory knowledge behind me, so instead of writing a technical master piece, I wrote something that sounded good to me(which is what music should be, right?). I have everything except the solo down because i wasn't sure what scales to use or the key it was in.

Now, the chords used in the song are A5, G5, F5, F#5, B5 and E5. I'm guessing a music guru could tell me the key of the song from these chords.

Then the chords used over the solo are B5, A5, F#5 and G5, so what scale(s) would be appropriate to use(like the pentatonic minor, natural minor?).


Thanks in advance.

L.F.C
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#2
You'd probably be fine using the B natural minor or minor pentatonic over the solo section. That part's definitely in B minor.

I don't know about the first part though. I'd like to say B minor as well, but I'd need some more context first.
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea
#3
The first progression sounds like it resolves to A because of that E at the end acting as the dominant. Is that the actual progression though? If not it would be helpful to know that since right now it could be a number of things.

For the solo section you could use B minor/D major over it. I can hear it resolving in both ways when I play a Bm or a D right after the G.
When I add qualities to the 5 chords in the solo section I get Bm, Amaj, F#m, Gmaj.
Quote by DiminishedFifth
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Last edited by FacetOfChaos at Aug 28, 2010,
#4
No, sorry, the first set of chords are just all the chords that are used in the song.

The intro and chorus goes A5, G5, F5, F5, G5, A5. The verse(and backing to the solo) goes B5, A5, B5, A5, G5, F#5, G5, F#5.

I can tab them out if you want, if it will make things clearer?

L.F.C
Quote by tubatom868686
One time I sneezed and pooped in my pants at someones house. It fell down my pantleg onto the floor. I blamed it on the dog. They believed me
#5
Okay that's much more helpful. The F#5 is what threw a wrench into things.
For the first part I'd say it's in A minor.
Sounds like Am, G, F.

For the second bit I'll keep my answer the same.
Quote by DiminishedFifth
Who's going to stop you? The music police?
#6
Quote by FacetOfChaos
Okay that's much more helpful. The F#5 is what threw a wrench into things.
For the first part I'd say it's in A minor.
Sounds like Am, G, F.

For the second bit I'll keep my answer the same.
Yep. Intro and chorus are A minor and verse and solo are B minor.
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea
#7
Thanks for the help guys, but is it ok to have different parts of a song in different keys? I know there's no law against it, but should it sound musically correct.
To my ear, the parts sound good, and I know many of bands change the key in the middle of their songs(like livin' on a prayer and welcome to the black parade), but is it normal to change it for the chorus compared to the verse?

And any chance you can tell me what notes would be used for a key change to do a sort of small bridge type part between the intro/verse and verse/chorus? I'm guessing this will make the parts flow together more smoothly and make the overall product sound better.

Thanks again.

L.F.C
Quote by tubatom868686
One time I sneezed and pooped in my pants at someones house. It fell down my pantleg onto the floor. I blamed it on the dog. They believed me
#8
Quote by richie7410
Thanks for the help guys, but is it ok to have different parts of a song in different keys? I know there's no law against it, but should it sound musically correct.
To my ear, the parts sound good, and I know many of bands change the key in the middle of their songs(like livin' on a prayer and welcome to the black parade), but is it normal to change it for the chorus compared to the verse?
I think your song should be fine. Yes it's pretty normal to change keys between sections of a song.

Quote by richie7410
And any chance you can tell me what notes would be used for a key change to do a sort of small bridge type part between the intro/verse and verse/chorus? I'm guessing this will make the parts flow together more smoothly and make the overall product sound better.
In your case, it sounds fine. The keys are so closely related that they flow together pretty smoothly, particularly using the chords you used.
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea
#9
It happens ALL the time. If it sounds like what you want it to sound like, it's correct (as long as you aren't writing to limitations for an assignment or anything). Some bands don't even repeat parts and go through multiple key changes over the course of the song. As long as it sounds good to you, keep it. Theory just explains why things sound a certain way.

A minor and B minor are just two notes different so they're pretty closely related which makes transitions smoother on its own.
Quote by DiminishedFifth
Who's going to stop you? The music police?
Last edited by FacetOfChaos at Aug 28, 2010,
#10
Awesome, thanks again for all the help.

L.F.C
Quote by tubatom868686
One time I sneezed and pooped in my pants at someones house. It fell down my pantleg onto the floor. I blamed it on the dog. They believed me